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ISX

Just a little deep..

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That was more than a little deep! I sunk one car on a flooded interstate. Once committed, there is no choice but to keep going because you dare not turn around. I guess that's what that Ford pickup I saw had in mind... but I'm here to tell you it really was not a good idea. I had the interior flooded above the front seat cushion, water in the trunk, water in the crank case, transmission, rear end. Flywheel housing, starter, alternator. It really sucked. I had the car towed off the interstate, a wrench dried the distributor enough to drive it home. I put it in the shop & used a bilge pump to pump the water out, wet vacced the rugs & such. I could have had a mushroom farm growing in the carpets by the next weekend. The insurance was pretty generous with me but a year later the rust popped through all the fenders...Russ

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I watched it again... totally insane. People get killed doing crap like that. My ex-FIL used to get big bucks (and no bargain at that) towing 4 X 4s off the beach with a bulldozer before the incoming ocean tide could get to them. They were stuck, not drowned though. It was several hundred dollars cash money, no checks, no credit cards in advance or he'd not drop the ramps on the trailer. His sons used to give Dad hell for even doing it... small hours of the morning the Police would call. The next day, the boys would have to power wash the machine to get the sand & salt out of the tracks & regrease the machine. Ole John used to laugh... the driver/owner could always shake down his buddies for the cash... "Frat boys..."

Edited by flagmanruss
Russ can't spell

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Lots of thoughts... I wonder what vehicle this is. Clearly prepped for this. Clearly not running a BHAF! I recall a guy who repowered his older 35' Chris Craft with a pair of GM V diesels c 1985... not sure what they were as he did not have us work on them. (I'm actually glad as he was a jerk.) The boat was a leaker & lived on the pumps. A couple of times, it tried to make like a submarine. We walked the boatyard docks every morning... Boats that were in danger, we'd throw our pumps on & call the owner. So after one such incident, the guy's mechanic appears. The owner (owned a used car dealership) told the mechanic that the mechanic had done something wrong as the motor was "siezed". The mechanic thought he was going to wheel the dead motor up the floating dock... He quoted him a favorable price to lift it out (after he freed it up) with our fork lift (from the solid ground of the lift pier) & place it in his truck. What had happened is... the Chris Craft (as most boats) have a wet exhaust... the cooling water is dumped into the exhaust through a riser after the engine... and the exhaust / cooling water flows overboard through the transom (or outdrive in an I/O) So although the CC did not "sink", the motor had. When the exhausts got deep enough, flooding water had flowed back up the exhaust & filled a chamber through an open exhaust port. Attempting to start it had brought the piston up on a fluid filled cylinder... bending the connecting rods. The auto / truck mechanic was at a loss to explain the damage & was being stuck for the repairs by "the jerk" until I explained to the mechanic what had happened. Although more rare, I understand that a running engine could have problems if the transom was slapped just right by a following sea. Many boats had rubber flappers on their dual 4" or larger exhausts. A lot of commercial boats had wet (water cooled) exhaust manifolds, but the water dumped overboard through a hose & through hull fitting, while the hot dry exhaust would be a stack... noisey & sooty to have on your white decks.

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It's one of these. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_Hilux Surely one of the later generations of the 80's or 90's. You sure have a lot of stories to tell about things on the water. I have to drive 45 miles to get to the closest lake, so I have barely heard or seen any stories like that. Very interesting how they did all the water cooling of the exhaust. Maybe he shoulda put stacks on it :lol:

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I owned a very small share in the place...

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Not a great way to start the morning...

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I hope I'm not boring you guys.

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Let's see, the place got sold ~1987... my ex took care of my proceeds from the sale.I'd not last a minute on a floating dock these days... it's all I can do to walk on solid ground.

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