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01cummins4ever

cold mornings fuel gelling

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So latley when the temps get below 5 to -5 below, my fuel pressure is showing about 2 to sometimes 4 psi greater. It normally idles at 18 psi. now its at 20 when I first start it up and has went to 22 once. This morning I left in hurry at 6 a.m, temp  at negative 6. I only let truck warm up for 10 minutes or so. temp not even registering on gauge yet. I figured Id just take it easy going down road till it started climbing. I got about 4 miles and temp was lucky to see 160 and fuel pressure was showing 22 psi. then it started dropping all the way below 10 psi. so I stopped to try to build more heat.

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Even with temps as low as -15*F this winter I've only seen fuel pressure drop maybe 1 PSI lower than typical. No warm up time.

Might consider changing fuel filters to be sure the filter isn't just half plugged up with dirt.

Also the fall out might be the pressure regulator sticking open on the Raptor which they are known for doing.

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Have you used an anti-gel additive lately? 

The fuel pressure being higher then normal then lower then normal points to flow issues.  Is you pressure sensors after you filter as, above it could be your fuel filters plugged/thick fuel. 

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White bottle of power service and 2 stroke during the winters. Only way I can keep it from gelling here.

30 minutes ago, Dieselfuture said:

Kerosene is OK but it's very dry so I would mix 2 cycle a bit heavier, I have same problem here in Iowa, they claimed to have diesel treated to negative 10 but at 0 it will jell up. So I usually add power service even though there are mixed opinions on it it seems to work. also after I fill up with whatever I mix my fuel with after getting home I drain some fuel out of my fuel filter in a clear jar and set it outside for reference. If I come out in the morning and it milky, then more likely I'll have pressure problems and if I can I drive something else.  

Reply merged from double post.

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pressure sensors are aft. filter, so ya I will be replacing filter but it s going to have to wait till I can get to town and get one. I got some 911 in a red bottle in the garage, I m going out right now to pour some in and run it a while to let it mix, I got to take off again in the morn, and hopefully I have better luck. I also put some cardboard in front of the radiator, maybe that will help get it up to temp.

 

 

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8 hours ago, Royal Squire said:

What about plugging it in overnite 

Won't heat the fuel tank... Everything in the fuel tank is ice cold and clouding up. More or less like attempting to pump orange juice with pulp. The first few minutes will be fine till the pulp (wax) start to pile up on the filter. This why the fuel fuel heater is provided is to hopefully heat the fuel enough to get above the clouding point of the fuel.

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39 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Won't heat the fuel tank... Everything in the fuel tank is ice cold and clouding up. More or less like attempting to pump orange juice with pulp. The first few minutes will be fine till the pulp (wax) start to pile up on the filter. This why the fuel fuel heater is provided is to hopefully heat the fuel enough to get above the clouding point of the fuel.

I'm just suggesting when it's 5* or below plugging it in might be wise. Warm when you start that way. 

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It gets plugged in every morning about 1.5  to 2 hr. It's usually plenty for an easy start. 

6 hours ago, Buzzinhalfdozen said:

Get some of these and never gel again!

image.jpeg.70ea244c751b64239719626ffce93

Even when it's like this outside. 

image.jpeg.65ea5b14594d95a2729c77db93aa5

I will have to look into those I like the idea of 12v. I take it that you can turn them off and on when needed

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17 hours ago, 01cummins4ever said:

It gets plugged in every morning about 1.5  to 2 hr. It's usually plenty for an easy start. 

Since you are plugged in I would decrease your warm up time. 3-5 minutes max and 10 minutes is excessive. Those numbers are from Cummins. 

You really only need 10-15 seconds of idle time since you plug it in. 

 

I run a pair of fuel heaters. The OEM 300w one in the filter bowl and a MOPAR one at my 1st filter that is also 300w. While you shouldn't need it with properly winterized fuel it isn't a bad idea to be safe. 

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On 12/28/2015 at 10:08 AM, Royal Squire said:

I'm just suggesting when it's 5* or below plugging it in might be wise. Warm when you start that way. 

Like today my truck sat out along the highway all day. I rode my ATV up the mountain to help the Fire Chief move a dead fire truck into his shop. Nothing to plug into. This why I don't get dependent on "Plugging In" the truck just because the temperature fell. What happens if you are at work and have no where to plug in? Maybe nice to do when parked at home.

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12 hours ago, AH64ID said:

Since you are plugged in I would decrease your warm up time. 3-5 minutes max and 10 minutes is excessive. Those numbers are from Cummins. 

You really only need 10-15 seconds of idle time since you plug it in. 

 

I run a pair of fuel heaters. The OEM 300w one in the filter bowl and a MOPAR one at my 1st filter that is also 300w. While you shouldn't need it with properly winterized fuel it isn't a bad idea to be safe. 

Yes I like to error on the side of caution we never can be to sure what's comming out of the pumps. Even if the refineries have the proper specs you don't know what's in them underground tanks at the filling station. I'm sure you can't filter out water.   

So far I just used some 911 and haven't had any issues, but  it hasn't dipped below 0 either

3 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Like today my truck sat out along the highway all day. I rode my ATV up the mountain to help the Fire Chief move a dead fire truck into his shop. Nothing to plug into. This why I don't get dependent on "Plugging In" the truck just because the temperature fell. What happens if you are at work and have no where to plug in? Maybe nice to do when parked at home.

I agree on becoming dependent on plugging in. It reminds me of some old road equipment we had an old case dozer and called it an either baby becouse it got started all winter on either and come summer time it still had to have its morning fix of either 

 

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