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Hawkez

Fuel pressure test port

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What are the options for installing a fuel pressure test port?  I know some to the late 2nd Gens had a schrader valve at the VP44 where fuel come in.  But if you upgrade your fuel lines and replace the banjo that gets removed.  I still have the banjo on the return line leaving the IP, can I put a test port there?  Or is there somewhere else that is better?

Thanks,

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Most would cut the line about a foot before the VP and put a T in. From there you can test. Most would prefer a full time gauge though, not just a test port.

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I have a full time gauge, but I wouldn't mind a port that I can tap into and verify that the gauge in the cab is accurate.

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I kept the oe fuel filter and installed a big line kit from Vulcan between the two. I got a tapped 90 for the connection to the VP and installed a port, from Vulcan also, in the 90. But you could just install a tapped tee in the fuel line and accomplish the same thing. I have one in my line for the FP gauge.  

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You could unhook the full time gauge and use that port to test.

Edited by TFaoro

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So are you just going to tee into the 90 that goes into the vp44? Or are you looking to splice the line again and add in the ability to plug in a test port?

I'm with TFaoro on this one, I'd just unscrew the full time gauge port and plug in my test gauge there. That way I'd be reading pressure from the same exact spot as my full time gauge.

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As long as you are testing the pressure after the last filter what difference does it make as to where? Myself I would not want to have to  disconnect the gauge just to screw in a test port. 

Edited by dripley

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1 minute ago, TFaoro said:

You shouldn't be testing it often though.... Unless you bought POS gauges

I get that.  But my gauges are electric and how often to people suggest to verify pressure with a mechanical gauge.  Since I am getting ready to replace my VP, I figured why not spend $20 extra dollars and put in a test port.  That is my thinking.  I may only use it once in a while, but it doesn't seem like a bad idea unless I am missing something. 

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15 minutes ago, TFaoro said:

You shouldn't be testing it often though.... Unless you bought POS gauges

That reminds me of glow shift, my first fp gauge. It crapped out but i think it was from the water hammer and my ignorance.

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With any fuel pressure gauge you should never hook up at the VP44 inlet. 

With all electric gauges they should be remote mounted away from VP44. Like mine I've got 5 feet of 1/8" air brake line to allow reduction of water hammer pulses. At the tap point I've got a needle valve and a snubber. Then 5 feet of tubing to the sensor.

Mechanical naturally have this long run after the tap point and also most are direct plumbed with a needle valve to dampen. Still in all I would use a ISSPro sintered stone snubber on my next mechanical gauge if I was to do it again. I'm very impressed with their snubbers. :thumbup2: 

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Sintered stone. Sounds like some gorilla grabbing clutch. I will have to google that one.

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so that is what sintered is? My exhaust brake has a little "filter" like that on the vacum line IIRC. Just little pieces of metal mashed together. I am sure that is over simplifacation of the product

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1 minute ago, dripley said:

so that is what sintered is? My exhaust brake has a little "filter" like that on the vacum line IIRC. Just little pieces of metal mashed together. I am sure that is over simplifacation of the product

Correct I've got the same thing too on my exhaust brake vacuum valve.

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If you want a mechanical gauge as a back up then why not just route in another tee and route a mechanical gauge with a needle valve at the tee so you could just pop the hood, open the needle valve and check it real quick, then close it back up and be good to go? That way you never loose pressure in the lines and have to re bleed.

@Mopar1973Man do you run the pressure tee, a snubber valve then a needle valve? Then connect the push lock for the hose then hose to gauge?

Edited by notlimah

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Push lock tee, brass elbow, needle valve, snubber push to connect fitting, 5 foot of 1/8" air brake tubing, push to connect fitting, then fuel pressure sensor..

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Aren't the snubber and needle valve supposed to do the same thing? Or did you add in the redundancy to protect the gauges even further?

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4 minutes ago, notlimah said:

Aren't the snubber and needle valve supposed to do the same thing? Or did you add in the redundancy to protect the gauges even further?

On an electric gauge like the ISSPro EV2, you can't use the needle valve for snubbing. Being the gauge is internally dampened by software and nearly impossible to set properly. Then needle valve now becomes a fallback safety shut off valve so if there was a tubing failure under the hood I can just simply close the needle valve and continue driving. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man

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1 minute ago, notlimah said:

Ahh yea I forgot you were running the electric gauges. I'm all mechanical.

Still even on mechanical gauges I would still have some means of shutting down the fuel at the tap point this way if there is a failure of any type then you still capable of driving the truck.

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Yea that's what I run on the 99 and how I was planning on installing it on the 02.

I run the push lock tee > needle valve > push lock fitting for hose > hose > push lock fitting for hose into gauge

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2 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

On an electric gauge like the ISSPro EV2, you can't use the needle valve for snubbing. Being the gauge is internally dampened by software and nearly impossible to set properly. Then needle valve now becomes a fallback safety shut off valve so if there was a tubing failure under the hood I can just simply close the needle valve and continue driving. 

I use a needle valve as a snubber.  I've never had any issues with mine.  The valve is just barely cracked open.

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