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So I got my A/C system recharged about a month or two ago with Freon and was getting super cold air and it was working great. Fast forward to yesterday and I was driving down to Seattle and my A/C is pretty much non-existent now. When I got it recharged, the guy mentioned that it looked like there was some dye in the system so someone at some point was looking for a leak and clearly there is, just not sure where.

 

My A/C never worked up until I got new Freon put in it and now it seems that due to a leak somewhere, it's depleted and A/C is no longer getting cold.

 

What should I start with?

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Posted (edited)

If it's empty now, I would change all orings and sensors, then vacuum the system and see if it holds it. If compressor is original may want to look in new one or mabe rebuild kit (not sure if doable) there might be kit out there. Reason I said change all sensors is personal preference, one time I worked on a Honda ac got it fixed and not even a month later one of the sensors failed, so I had to drain the system to change it.:2cents:

The dy works to find leaks may want to try that again too, if you don't want to change random orings and sensors.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00SZ4QFW0/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1500580697&sr=1-1&pi=AC_SX236_SY340_FMwebp_QL65

Edited by Dieselfuture

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What O-rings specifically?

 

As far as sensors, looks like the only one I can find is the ambient air temp sensor, is that all there is?

 

Should I replace, the compressor, condenser, and accumulator as well as O-rings? I just want to get this figured out once and for all and not have to mess with it later. 

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To be honest I don't know on these trucks,  but on several cars I fixed ac, you'd have orings at each connection. To condenser, to evaporator, maybe accumulator could be oring on any sensor, and I believe there is more than one maybe 3. Freon isn't too expensive, if you get the vacuum pump with kit so you can vacuum your self and not pay anyone then I wouldn't worry about changing compressor or any major components, I'd try research where all the conections are and change just orings to begin with, on sensors too. And you can maybe use a meter and make sure they work, and they should since your ac works fine just leaks out. You can buy an assortment of orings from part store probably. 

How long did it work before it quit.  I'm using some stop leak in a car I drive been working all summer,  but it's a 1500 dollar car too so, probably should fix it right. 

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I'd look at all the hoses and components for oil accumulation especially at all the connections and around the charge ports. The charge ports have schrader valves in them and you can't check them unless you charge the system. If it's empty, I would change them anyway. They are really not that expensive. If you can't see any visible signs of a leak, you could have a leak in the evaporator in the dash.

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Thanks for the input guys. I'll take a look at your article a little more in depth when I can @IBMobile.

 

When I bought the truck I don't think the A/C worked but I can't remember 100% as I live in a overall cooler climate, plus I just put the windows down anyways. Now I've been taking the family more so windows down isn't always an option. Got the system recharged about 2 months ago and it worked great for a while, now nothing but ambient temp coming out it feels.

 

No visible leaks I could see besides the typical condensation build up around the accumulator. 

 

I'm thinking just a full overhaul of the system may be in order, as I plan keeping the truck forever so might as well get everything freshened up.

 

If I were to just replace everything, is there anything special I'd need to do?

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DO NOT just replace parts. That will get you no where unless you get very lucky and catch what was leaking in the shot gun blast  of parts. Find a buddy with a leak sniffer. Come in very handy.

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Posted (edited)

Typically UV dye and black light with turn up an answer. As for doing a o-ring kit typically its about $8 to $12 bucks for a o-ring rebuild. There is 2 pressure sensors low pressure on the accumulator and the high pressure on the discharge line near the compressor.

 

All A/C system work I do, I will do a vacuum test before recharging. 

 

Any A/C system that has ZERO pressure I will not recharge till I remove the compressor, drain the oil,  add the proper amount and the holds on a vacuum test. If it will not hold a vacuum I will go back to hunting o-rings or condenser possibly. I've changed 2 this year now that was damaged by a flying rock and the other from a minor accident that the plastic grill hit it. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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Ok, I understand that just throwing parts at a problem isn't the best way to go about things, but in a system like this, isn't just replacing everything going to end up fixing it anyways? As well as having a working A/C system that's brand new?

 

I don't know anyone that has any tools to troubleshoot A/C systems otherwise I'd have done it. My only other option is to drop it off at a shop and let them fix it.

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The cost and time to replace the lines, sensors, condenser, receiver dryer, compressor and evaporator seems extremely silly to me.

 

Put it this way, that approach is like saying I need to rebuild an engine for a valve cover leak.

  • Haha 1

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Basically, you need to find the freon leak with either UV Dye and black light or freon sniffer. Once you figure out the leak then replace the damaged part. Typically I find bad o-rings and condenser damage.  Rare cases I find bad compressors where body seals give up or the front shaft seal fails. Those are tough to find with UV dye but a freon sniffer might detect it.

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Ok so sounds like replacing o-rings may be a bit more of a logical approach. If I did that do I drain the system? If so how? 

 

With th as much as I know about the A/C system I'm tempted to just drop it at a shop and have them fix it :duh:

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1 hour ago, notlimah said:

If I did that do I drain the system? If so how? 

 

Grab a vacuum pump and manifold gauge set pull a slight vacuum on the system SLOWLY. Once you have about 5inHg vacuum your safe to open up without the risk of explosion. Ask me how I know??? :duh:

 

1 hour ago, notlimah said:

With th as much as I know about the A/C system I'm tempted to just drop it at a shop and have them fix it

Might not want to do that... So far I've taken mine to 3 different shop chasing my leak. No one could find it. I finally found mine being the front compressor seal failed and was slinging the UV dye before I could spot it. Now I've been leak free for 4 or 5 years now. Still ICE cold. (35-38* vent temps).

 

I'm more than happy to guide you through this process. 

 

Personal note... I've got 2 A/C jobs to do in Riggins, ID by next Wednesday. I'm completely setup as a mobile service and been known to way into the back country and even rebuild an entire system on a 7.3 Ford diesel. 

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Wish we were closer to each other Mike!!

 

Well what would you suggest I start checking/replacing first?

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Posted (edited)

Personally I would get a o-ring set and try that first. Typically I get them for $12 buck from NAPA takes maybe a full hour to pull all the o-rings out and recharge the system. Not hard at all. You also need the release tool from NAPA they are plastic collar set that you pull into the spring locks to release the lines. Typically a bit of twisting motion and they slide out. 

 

Video is set for the process of release and installing of the lines. Take notice I did it single handed... :lmao:

 

 

Edited by Mopar1973Man

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For what it's worth, My A/C has not worked for some time. I went to a local repair shop and had them run a diagnostic test and found I have a hole in one of the lines from it rubbing on the air tunnel (?) from the turbocharger. Of course, they wanted to sell me on doing the work, and provided me with several scenarios with estimated cost per each one, up to and including replacement of the entire system. The bottom line - I know where to begin, with the replacement of the lines and the accumulator since I know that's a definitive issue. The diagnostic cost me about $65.00. Well worth the money to me.

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Buy the line yourself and replace it. If you had the vacuum pump and the manifold gauge set you could do the rest of the job recharging the system.

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I'll be picking up the lines and accumulator today and I'll find a source for the vacuum pump and gauge set.

I'm glad I found this forum. It's good to know there are knowledgeable, experienced DIYers who can "lend a hand".

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Head over the article section and you'll find articles on A/C recharging. Ive been doing it now for about 5 years.

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