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rogerash0

Dropping the transmission, tips n tricks

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Posted (edited)

Anyone have good advice for dropping the trans? Ive read the truck needs to be on jack stands to fit the tranny out. Some guys say seperate the transfer case, other guys say not to. My thoughts are keep them together, get the truck up a few inches on jack stands, get a harbor freight transmission jack because I can get it here & now, and go to town.

 

It's the little details like a double click of the converter, not hurting any seals as I slide it on, and/or anything else I may not know about. I'd rather not mess anything up. I do have the big factory service manuals here I will read first, but I thought maybe someone here could share some insight. I've never dropped a trans before. Im planning on swapping converters.

 

Also, my thoughts are doing it at home because all my tools are here. But for about $8/hr on the air force base I can have a proper stall with the truck in the air and work under it, and use their transmission jack instead. Do you guys think that's worthwhile? My thoughts are have the truck at home in case I run into any issues, plus I can make lunch here, take my time, work at night outside their hours, etc,etc.

thanks

 

edit; would jlbayes or Dynamic know of a spring I could put in my valve body to make first gear shift higher? Lavon said I should have green springs in there (tv,1-2 and 2-3), which are already the higher rpm shifting springs, so am I SOL?

Edited by rogerash0

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Posted (edited)

I've had mine out both with and without the transfer case. Unless you have a real jack I would separate them. It's alot of teeter totter and weight when they are together. Keep in mind though I have the $90 Harbor Frieght jack. It's not alot of extra work to separate them and makes life easier in my opinion. I had to jack up about 4" to roll it out on the jack. I would do it at home if it was me simply for the reasons you stated. If you run in to trouble you will be paying $8 an hour for the truck to just sit there. And the cross member. Don't be scared by all the horror stories you read. Look at it. It has to go up first as it sits in a wedge by design. Then it's free to go back and out. Might need to jack a little pressure under it and hammer tap it to break the rust free, but sledge hammers, gas wrenches, cussing and swearing are not necessary. I'll let the experts explain the TC seating since I'm sure there is a trick or two I don't know. One time it went right in and the other it was a challenge. You are right about the 2 clunks. One for the TC to go on the input and the other as it seats to the pump gear.Have a case of your choice chilling in the fridge for when you get done. It takes time the first time but is not that hard of a job.

Edited by dave110
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Posted (edited)

Agreed. Separate the transfer case and the transmission. Much easier. 

 

I did my 1996 Dodge 46RE with jack stands for that vertical clearance as well. I used nothing more than ratchet strap and a floor jack at the end. Took a bit more than 2 hours by myself to install. 

 

I typically use a 2x6 and a bottle jack and lightly spread the frame. Both my trucks are so tight I can even move the cross member with a sledgehammer. So just getting a bit of tension off the cross member I can lift it off the saddle and slide it out. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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That two by six idea sounds amazing. I had battled with that member in the past, and holy **** my mind was blown, lollol. Thanks for the suggestions & positive vibes, lads.

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Posted (edited)

There's three clicks to seating a converter. Be sure to fill it about a quart of fluid while spinning it on the ground before installing. 

Edited by trreed
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Yeah, that would not be good. For reference the small splines drive the input, the large ones the lockup clutch, and the notch on the end drives the pump. Do I have that right? If not correct me, it's been awhile. It would be good for @rogerash0 to know and understand.

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a friend and i removed the whole trans and xfer case in one shot.  being that the truck is on 35" tires i didnt need to jack anything up. get a heavy duty trans lift and strap it down so it dont fall off, its a heavy bish.  do it with 2 ppl, one to align the trans and one to work the jack.

 

while you are in there replace the rear main if it hasnt been done yet.

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My suggestion, as I done this many times is, buy a Harbor Frieght 10 ton Super Heavy Duty Portable Hydraulic Equipment Kit #60406. You can alao buy a good transmission jack that helps out a lot also there. The Hydraulic spreader helps spread the frame apart just enough to get the crossmemeber out that supports the transmission. This really helped out! Beats beating the thing off by far.

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Posted (edited)

Sounds good lads. It's a 59 degree morning and my truck had to crank for 5 sec to start. I promise u if the grids came on it would have started up in a second. I've noticed this habit from the truck for some time, but this am it seemed worse than usual. I parked it at 4pm yesterday and got in it at 0620 this am. Slight downward angle towards the front of the truck. Any thoughts?

 

Also are 47 and 48re torque converters the same? The box my dpc converter came in has no documentation besides my name and "3000 replacement". I didn't even realize he was sending me one, if that tells you anything.

I like that idea Mopar!!! Thanks. That thing I had no idea about it on my first rodeo, the beating it requires I mean, and I have some really bad memories of having to get the truck together to get to work at 6pm on a Sunday night and the beating that thing took. Edit; wow it's $200. Yikes. Atleast it ought to work then

Edited by rogerash0

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11 hours ago, trreed said:

That is a question for @jlbayes or @Dynamic. I just know it needs three clunks to seat

 

Yes, when you're installing the converter you're lining up three things; the input shaft to the turbine hub, the stator support to the stator, and the inner pump gear to the converter hub. Whether you get 3 distinct "clicks" or "clunks" may or may not be the case. Just feel for them to line up.

 

When the converter is in all the way, the front cover will be sticking out of the bell housing about 3/4" - 1" or so.

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3 hours ago, rogerash0 said:

Sounds good lads. It's a 59 degree morning and my truck had to crank for 5 sec to start. I promise u if the grids came on it would have started up in a second. I've noticed this habit from the truck for some time, but this am it seemed worse than usual.

 

 

You mean the :wts: did not come on? If so time to read up on ECM failures.

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Lol I'm pretty sure my ecm is just fine Dave. It just didn't get Cold enough . 

 

Thx guys. Maybe it's something I can achieve sure enough

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8 hours ago, rogerash0 said:

I promise u if the grids came on it would have started up in a second.

That's one reason I still like grids even in warmer temps, but in summer time I see no reason for them. I don't want unwanted wear on the starter, and using mpg switch they only come on for few seconds just enough to start with half the crank. 

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I didn't mean to tell you something you already know. Reason I brought it up is I have my grids switched off and only use them above 30 deg. Even then it fires right up. Just smokes and idles rough for a short bit. At 59 you should still get the grids. 

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Posted (edited)

Ya, my phone said 59 but maybe it was 62 or what not. I like the grids for that reason too, (fast starts,) but it seems wonky it would need them at all on a morning that warm. I guess the test will be mid-summer on a real warm morning, does she crank right up or are the grids that big of a bandaid. 

 

Dave I mostly lol'd because we are so used to everything being broken or breaking on these trucks. So right away you point to an ecm failing. I feel like it's a second gen thing haha

Edited by rogerash0

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We're not seeing each others points, and for that I apologize. I did not throw ECM out there without good reason. If your truck takes 5 sec. to start it's not because it needs the grids to come on. Especially not at 60 degrees. They did not come on because the ECM was slow to boot, which points to it starting to fail. And the truck will not start until the WTS lite comes on. I have no way of knowing if you know this already or not so I brought it up in an attempt to help. I know because I've already been there and went through it. Sorry for any confusion. I'll step out now and let your thread carry on. 

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Posted (edited)

Dave I just tend to think statically, and I tell myself the odds of the ECM being slow to boot on a 60 degree morning but not on a 50 or 45 degree morning are low. Odds of my phone's temp being a bit off, or the truck picking up a different temp than the exact air temp, are greater. I cant recall the exact cut off air temp for the grids, but I want to say its 62 degrees or so. Could be 65..

Not out of the factory manual, but from dodgeram.org

Quote

The ground path is provided by the PCM if intake manifold air temperature is less than 60°F 
(15°C) when the ignition key is turned to the ON position. When the ground is provided, the
air heater is energized to start the preheat cycle. The preheat-cycle can be tested with a 
voltmeter or test light. If the intake manifold air temperature is above 15°C (59°F), the 
wait-to-start warning lamp will not illuminate and the air heater will not be energized.
Note that the warning lamp will illuminate as a "bulb check" for approximately two seconds 
each time the key is turned on.

 

I get the bulb check for aprox 2 sec /w key on. Read that article some years ago, and have given it some thought previously, that's why I've already got my mind made up the ECM aint bad.

See the grid heater temp chart here:
http://dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/troubleshooting/Maniford_htr.htm

Edited by rogerash0

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15 hours ago, dave110 said:

because the ECM was slow to boot, which points to it starting to fail.

 

Booting issues of the ECM will stop the truck from even starting. The very first instruction is to do the blub check for the WTS and fire the grid heaters if required for the IAT temperature.

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Does the tranny fill line pull right up and out? Also does anyone use loctite on the comverter bolts, and what torque? I think it's 45ft lbs, perhaps a bit on the high end. Or we can just go hella tight.

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I believe on the dipstick there is just a bolt that holds it to engine and it pulls right out, I think there may be an oring or something similar. It wouldn't be a bad idea to use some Loctite, torque is always good, but a lot of times I just went hella tight too ha ha. I've tightened so many bolts in my life my hands are kinda like torque wrench now.

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There is a specified torque for all those bolts in the FSM. Yeah in stock design these numbers are fine. Now aftermarket stuff it might change some. Check with your part supplier if there is changes in torque values. I tend to favor the torque wrench on assembly because it gets everything evenly tight less issues of things coming apart in high stress applications.

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