Jump to content
  • Welcome To Mopar1973Man.Com

    We can see you lurking about Mopar1973Man.Com reading articles and reading other member's posts. Are you trying to solve a problem with your Dodge / Ram Turbo Diesel Cummins? We have lots of helpful members and staff on the Mopar1973Man.Com and are willing to give guidance on how to fix or improve your truck. Sorry, we are a subscription website now. We are not corporate owned like many of the other websites out there. Like Cummins Forum (VerticalScope Inc.). Mopar1973Man.Com is entirely privately owned and operated since 2004. Your subscription funds goes towards server maintenance and software maintenance. We happen to be one of the most friendliest and helpful websites  for Cummins Owners in the world. Come join us and register and then pick a subscription plan.

4X4 bearing Hubs and ABS Discussion....


Recommended Posts

  • Administrator
15 minutes ago, Haggar said:

The design of our tires (and pressures) would have a much more significant impact on mileage.  Heck our frontal area alone....  or at least our height above the road..... 

 

Bingo. Like I've been saying all along with tire size and tread pattern. Even lift kits and leveling kits impact the MPG more so than bearing / unlocking hubs. I always that it was funny I'm running a solid axle to this day I still hold the MPG record even about CAD axle design. This proves that axles and hub design aren't going to make an MPG change. 

 

20 minutes ago, Haggar said:

With our central axle disconnect what turns when we unlock?  On the passenger side a very small stub shaft.   On the driver side, again a stub shaft and the spiders in the carrier.  The ring and pinion do no turn.  The front propeller shaft does not turn.

 

Actually, the driveshaft still turns but at a much slower rate. The drag of the cold gear lube prevents the driveshaft from turning faster.  Like my 96 Dodge has the CAD axle it has not made big leaps in MPG at all. Now what I'm planning on picking up on Tuesday will make a huge improvement. I'm dumping the 235/85 R16 and going to a 215/85 R16 tire. Increasing the final ratio and reducing the engine load from the excessively low final ratio. Then with the tire being narrower and 1-inch shorter is going to reduce the rotational mass more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 95
  • Created
  • Last Reply
  • Board Of Directors

Thats what I love about this forum.... people take the time to help and explain some very intelligent aspect about the subject at hand. 

 

Thank you Haggar, you put some work into explaining that. And to you also Mopar1973Man, I appreciate all that has been said.

 

Will get back in a day or so.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know you're probably not supposed to do it, but I put antiseize on the mating surface of mine. Also if you take a socket and extension and place in on the back of the bolt and have the extension press on to the knuckle of the axel then turn the steering wheel it will pop the bearing right off. Typically you just thread each of the 4 bolts in just enough so that they are flush on the hub and do the before mentioned method hitting all 4 bolts. That's how I did mine and it was effortless. Especially if you do it with the front axel on jack stands. Saw some guy on youtube do it a couple of months ago. I'll see if I can find the video.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with anti sieze on surfaces. Dodge should have done on the assembly line. Mine come effortlessly now. I learned about the PS method long after I did mine. It seems the BFH was the preferred method back then.

Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

PS method works good when you have 2 people. The new air hammer tool works great for a single guy. 

I fitted may super heavy duty rivet gun with tip with brass end, makes fast work of it. And makes all the ball joints slip off when hitting the side of the fitting 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, dripley said:

Nothing wrong with anti sieze on surfaces. Dodge should have done on the assembly line. 

I agree 100%, probably cost too much though. I use anti sieze on everything I can, makes life down the road a lot easier. I also wish farm equipment manufacturers learned to use the stuff too. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

PS method works good when you have 2 people. The new air hammer tool works great for a single guy. 

Works just fine with one person.  I did mine this way on my own and I had no trouble or need or any one else.  No need to buy tools that I don't need.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

JAG if you don't mind I'll post here instead of starting a new thread. 

I think I'll be buying a set of new hubs as my passenger side was kinda growling at me on the way to work today, not sure if it's wind or tire. I actually completely flushed old grease out using mineral spirits thinner, put some through sensor hole using small funnel, spun hub back and forth, used old vacuum cleaner to suck it all out, repeat about 5 times till it was spotless inside. Then I used electric cleaner to flush out mineral spirits out and once again vacuum. Then I used my grease zerk I put in few years ago and pumped it full of Kendall grease mentioned above, spun hub and then vacuumed out some for air space inside. Bearings are tight and spun nice with little drag, with or without grease. So I'm not sure if they're bad but my ABS keeps coming and going and that slight noise from passenger side got me thinking. I was thinking abs light was from using wrong grease but now I have a completely different stuff in there and still same issue. 

My question is, original bearing seem to be listed as Mopar 5015282AA and rockauto has Timken HA590203 and in description it says OEM # 5015282AA 

So we're these Timpken original, or was it SKF, or who did dodge use. And which ones are better. I'm not buying any China junk!

I think I may go to local Sadler Power Train place and see what they got, they usually carry good stuff. 

Anyone knows, let me know. Thanks. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just bought a carrier bearing from RA for drive shaft, SKF. On the box made in china. There descriotion states thay make oe stuff for many manufacturers. The Spicer listed below it say they manufacture theirs all over the world. I dont know how you can avoid ending up with things made in china short of going somewhere and seeing the product before you buy it. I also put front hubs on mine about 50k ago and have no idea who or where they were made.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator
38 minutes ago, Dieselfuture said:

So I'm not sure if they're bad but my ABS keeps coming and going and that slight noise from passenger side got me thinking. I was thinking abs light was from using wrong grease but now I have a completely different stuff in there and still same issue. 

 

Tone ring broke loose. Same problem I had with mine once I replace both unit bearings as a pair ABS light is gone.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

 

Tone ring broke loose. Same problem I had with mine once I replace both unit bearings as a pair ABS light is gone.

You know I keep forgetting to try and spin tone ring with a screw driver every time I have it apart :duh: 

 

Just spoke with Sadler and they want almost 300 for one of Timpken that rockauto has for 170, I had the guy look on the box and he did say it's made in US, so I guess rock aututo it is then. I'll do a bit more search here and probably order them, so much for buying spear rims and tires lol. 

Definitely don't want to wait to pay tow bill, that be the price of hubs :duh:

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator

Lets put it this way don't get all wrapped up in finding Timken bearing. Let's just say the all fail just the same so why spend more money on a brand that will fail just the same way. I've been running SKF bearings and get roughly 150k to 180k from a set of unit bearings.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree @Mopar1973Man. My oe last just ove 200k. I had 200k on the replacements when i changed. Bought one from NAPA and one from somewhere else never looked to even see where they came from, I had to have them. The ones I put on around 410k cmae from a member here 6 or so years ago. Paid him $150 for the pair. They were not in boxes nor did they have any writing on the bearings. Hope they last 200k. 

 When i grew up in the 50's and 60's Made in Japan was the sign of cheap stuff. Look at them now. Sure some crappy stuff still comes out of China, but the American co's that use them wont stay in buisness long with cheap crap failing all over the place. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Board Of Directors

Do any you guys think my smokin the front brakes had anything to do with the front bearing going toast at 99,000 miles? They were so hot I had to stop let them cool. I'm guessing I could have cooked the grease and several hundred miles later I got thrown into the fast lane, almost out of control, when the left bearing gave way.

 

What new air hammer you guys talking about? I need to learn about air tools.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Administrator

Absolutely... Once you put that much heat into the rotor it's going to radiate into the unit bearing cooking the grease. This is why I'm a big fan of manual transmissions and exhaust brakes. Automatics can do well too but with 4 gears it hard to get a selection of gear that prevents long brake usage I've got this problem with mt 96 Dodge half ton with the 46RE transmission.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.



  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      17,203
    • Total Posts
      235,117
  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      8,352
    • Most Online
      1,277

    Newest Member
    Kennyray
    Joined
×
×
  • Create New...