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I’m looking for a list of items to keep in my truck on long trips and trips into remote backcountry. I can think of a few things off my head but like a detailed list of things that can keep my truck on the road if necessary. 

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I carry a assortment of hand tools, a spare serpentine belt but no real spare parts. If I carried any something else would break. Might carry a spare lift pump if I can get the failed one working. But I dont see the back country in mine. 

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3 minutes ago, dripley said:

I carry a assortment of hand tools, a spare serpentine belt but no real spare parts. If I carried any something else would break. Might carry a spare lift pump if I can get the failed one working. But I dont see the back country in mine. 

Thanks man! Don’t you carry a spare chicken in case you get hungry? Lol. I have a serpentine belt on my list along with a small toolset including a 3/4 end wrench for cracking injectors in case I run out of fuel. 

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Never carry any tools or parts. No sense in it. Every time something has happened to me in the backcountry there isn't a tool that will fix it. Like for example breaking the main shaft of the transmission. Unit bearing failed. None of this stuff can be fixed along the road. What I do pack is everything to ensure my own survival.

  • 2 MRE's (Meals Ready to Eat)
  • 2 half gallon jugs of water
  • Extra jacket
  • Gloves to keep my hands warm
  • Cigarette lighter and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Mutli-tool
  • Poncho or tarp
  • GPS 
  • Flashlight & batteries

So when this happens...

Image result for mopar1973man mainshaft

 

You know the list above will keep you alive till you can get to safety. It wont do you any good to have a bunch of heavy tools if the part that failed you don't have. Like I said before whatever fails typically you don't have the tools or the means for repairing in the backcountry. Now the truck is dead and not moving can you ensure your survival? 

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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Personally I think there is a big difference bewteen long trips and remote trips.  

Remote trips...think more survival as in water and food and keeping warm.  

Long trips...2 credit cards, fsm in your phone.  

Back to remote.  Nobody's going to bail you out except yourself.  We have 4 day food supply under back seat and usually carry two 3 gallon water jugs.  

 

(I think @Mopar1973Man  and I hit send button same time.)

 

Anyway also depends your understanding of "remote"

Edited by 015point9
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6 minutes ago, Marcus2000monster said:

Thanks man! Don’t you carry a spare chicken in case you get hungry? Lol. I have a serpentine belt on my list along with a small toolset including a 3/4 end wrench for cracking injectors in case I run out of fuel. 

I carry a rubber chicken for fun. It is not edible or chokeable for those that might inquire.

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1 minute ago, 015point9 said:

Personally I think there is a big difference bewteen long trips and remote trips.  

Remote trips...think more survival as in water and food and keeping warm.  

Long trips...2 credit cards, fsm in your phone.  

Back to remote.  Nobody's going to bail you out except yourself.  We have 4 day food supply under back seat and usually carry two 3 gallon water jugs.  

 

2 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Never carry any tools or parts. No sense in it. Every time something has happened to me in the backcountry there isn't a tool that will fix it. Like for example breaking the main shaft of the transmission. Unit bearing failed. None of this stuff can be fixed along the road. What I do pack is everything to ensure my own survival.

  • 2 MRE's (Meals Ready to Eat)
  • 2 half gallon jugs of water
  • Extra jacket
  • Gloves to keep my hands warm
  • Cigarette lighter and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Mutli-tool
  • Poncho or tarp
  • GPS 
  • Flashlight & batteries

So when this happens...

Image result for mopar1973man mainshaft

 

You know the list above will keep you alive till you can get to safety. It wont do you any good to have a bunch of heavy tools if the part that failed you don't have. Like I said before whatever fails typically you don't have the tools or the means for repairing in the backcountry. Now the truck is dead and no moving can you ensure your survival? 

I agree with you gentlemen. I plan to carry all of the above. I’m thinking maybe a spare Carter fuel pump, serpentine belt, and I always carry extra engine oil. Also have a Haynes repair manual. 

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3 minutes ago, 015point9 said:

Long trips...2 credit cards, fsm in your phone.

 

LOL... You would be stuck. Even traveling through my home area there is no cellservice for over a 100 mile span of the canyon. Ask @IBMobile he learned really quick even though he was right on US95 and just north of Riggins, ID by 8 miles there was no cell service to get help with. Like the New meadows tower only has service for about 12 miles total and it gone. 

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Just now, Mopar1973Man said:

 

LOL... You would be stuck. Even traveling through my home area there is no cellservice for over a 100 mile span of the canyon. Ask @IBMobile he learned really quick even though he was right on US95 and just north of Riggins, ID by 8 miles there was no cell service to get help with. Like the New meadows tower only has service for about 12 miles total and it gone. 

Agreed Mike. Woodcutting yesterday in the mountains and had zero cell service. Satellite phone is the only option I believe. 

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1 minute ago, Marcus2000monster said:

 

I agree with you gentlemen. I plan to carry all of the above. I’m thinking maybe a spare Carter fuel pump, serpentine belt, and I always carry extra engine oil. Also have a Haynes repair manual. 

 

Just now, Mopar1973Man said:

 

LOL... You would be stuck. Even traveling through my home area there is no cellservice for over a 100 mile span of the canyon. Ask @IBMobile he learned really quick even though he was right on US95 and just north of Riggins, ID by 8 miles there was no cell service to get help with. Like the New meadows tower only has service for about 12 miles total and it gone. 

I just wait for one of your fine law enforcement types and have them call.  

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1 minute ago, Marcus2000monster said:

Does anyone have a recommendation for a pro set of jumper cables? 

 

Jumper cables only work if there is a second vehicle. If there is a second vehicle your rescued. I typically have a cheapy set in the bed for the winter time. I've never need a jump start but I've given plenty to others. 

1 minute ago, 015point9 said:

I just wait for one of your fine law enforcement types and have them call.  

 

 

You could be waiting a very long time. Like Idaho country no longer comes to Riggins much anymore. The Adams country rarely goes north towards my place one in a blue moon. Hoping for a deputy to bail you out is not a good answer. With budget cuts in both country patrolling is no one of the highlights any longer. 

 

3 minutes ago, Royal Squire said:

Haynes manual may be better than nothing, but just barely. IMO 

 

Fire starters to go along with the matches. :lmao:

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3 minutes ago, Marcus2000monster said:

 

I agree with you gentlemen. I plan to carry all of the above. I’m thinking maybe a spare Carter fuel pump, serpentine belt, and I always carry extra engine oil. Also have a Haynes repair manual. 

After you get spare carter pump practice putting it on just to make sure.  I carry one so that I'm not subjected to the mechanic where I break down at.  Not to mention good insurance, now my regular pump won't ever break:thumb1:

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Here we are worrying about lift pumps. :rolleyes:

 

I look at this way the truck fails for whatever reason. I'm better of getting to services then placing a phone call for tow or repair. At the point of failure, I see my truck as one thing shelter. If the weather is poor at least the cold wind is not blowing on you or being soaked by downpour rains or snow storm. If you got food and water and possibly a blanket you'll be able to relax and wait the storm out. Even if its just a simple flat tire. There is no need to get out and get soaking wet. 

 

Yeah, you can carry a spare belt if you want. I quit doing that because in 356k miles I've broken ZERO fan belts. I don't bother with the spare lift pump idea anymore. In 13 years of service, I've never lost a lift pump on the road. Typically those give warning like my AirDog was loud and pressures were dropping over a solid week. I knew it was dying. I do carry fuses. That a simple fix but if it blows twice do NOT insert the 3rd one. There is something wrong! Like my trailer blew the trailer fuse. then blew the second one. Yeap. The tail light shorted out and MELTED everything! Again even though some of these things appear like they can be fixed in the field are typically wind up not being to repair because you need another part. Just like my lasted I hitched up my RV in Parma, ID and dome light went out and the power mirrors quit. Wasn't a fuse problem and couldn't be fixed in the field. 

 

This is why I don't bother with a ton of tools (which I carry one socket set that's it!). I will not carry spare parts like belts because by the time a year goes by the belt is total beat up and worthless and still never used. 

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5 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

 

Jumper cables only work if there is a second vehicle. If there is a second vehicle your rescued. I typically have a cheapy set in the bed for the winter time. I've never need a jump start but I've given plenty to others. 

 

You could be waiting a very long time. Like Idaho country no longer comes to Riggins much anymore. The Adams country rarely goes north towards my place one in a blue moon. Hoping for a deputy to bail you out is not a good answer. With budget cuts in both country patrolling is no one of the highlights any longer. 

 

 

Fire starters to go along with the matches. :lmao:

 

With all the good people in idaho someone would stop and offer help.  (Even if their idea of help was offering the their "only dodge" tool they have.  Which was a pair of gloves so my hands dont get cold pushing on the tailgate.  Wasn't to funny.  Happened south of Owyhee area near jarbridge and duck valley  years ago. 

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Another good example I was heading out to get firewood for the day with a friend and took the 1996 Dodge 1500. Got back up in the Nezperce Forest about 15 miles from town and the truck simply just died. I had tools with me again a socket set. After all my simple testing looking for fuel in the injector rail, and spark at the spark plugs I realize my PCM was fried. Not a single thing I could do but turn the truck around which we did. We managed to get the truck turn around and got a free downhill ride which put us near a ranch house to make a phone call and get a tow truck to pick up. Again there wasn't a single thing my socket set could of fixed. I needed a PCM... So I had the tools to pull the old one off but that would of been a week to wait for the new one to come. Better off towing to safety. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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I carry a small tarp so I can slide under the truck easily, a spare lift pump which I needed to change 35 miles from home only once so far, a better bottle jack than the factory, a torque wrench for checking wheel torque on aluminum wheels. Cash for more versatility, and a new idler pulley and belt with the tools to change it out. Last, but not Least, Mopar1973Man's phone number. :lol:

 

Mopar1973Man, a couple flares be good on that mtn road you drive.... comin around the curve on snow they may not see you on time boss.

 

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21 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Here we are worrying about lift pumps. :rolleyes:

 

 

 

I didnt worry about anything in mine till I reached up about $3,000 in new lift pump,  Towing , car rental and lousy mechanic.  Now armed with this cite. Fsm in phone and lap top.  And learned about a few things about our trucks.  Before I got ripped off my thinking was why learn, these trucks as hardly ever break down so why take the time to learn about them?  So today everything I need for full timing in RV.  Few tools, rv supplies, wood working stuff, jewelry making stuff.  Now if wife would get better medically, I would be where t-stat on rv heater doesn't come on. 

20181021_144221.jpg

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I'll give you all a clue. Most all failures give clues in performance like MPG record dropping out. Like my VP44 was dropping MPG well before the pump died. Most other failures show up as heat. EGT's higher than normal, coolant temperature higher than normal or transmission temperature higher than normal. 

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2 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Never carry any tools or parts. No sense in it. Every time something has happened to me in the backcountry there isn't a tool that will fix it. Like for example breaking the main shaft of the transmission. Unit bearing failed. None of this stuff can be fixed along the road. What I do pack is everything to ensure my own survival.

  • 2 MRE's (Meals Ready to Eat)
  • 2 half gallon jugs of water
  • Extra jacket
  • Gloves to keep my hands warm
  • Cigarette lighter and matches
  • First aid kit
  • Mutli-tool
  • Poncho or tarp
  • GPS 
  • Flashlight & batteries

So when this happens...

Image result for mopar1973man mainshaft

 

You know the list above will keep you alive till you can get to safety. It wont do you any good to have a bunch of heavy tools if the part that failed you don't have. Like I said before whatever fails typically you don't have the tools or the means for repairing in the backcountry. Now the truck is dead and not moving can you ensure your survival? 

That is very sound advice for rural trips. I'd also recommend a fire extinguisher. I've had 2 engine fires in the mountains with my 78. I had fire extinguishers both times in the truck because regulations of the business my grandfather had required all vehicles on the job site be equipped with fire extinguishers, he was a logger. Of the many break downs of various vehicles we had spare parts or mechanics tools never got us home but things like food, warm clothing, matches, etc... kept us alive to get home. Let's face it, it's not if we are going to to break down but when we are going to break down. If it's got boobs, tracks, or wheels it's going to give you trouble.

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1 minute ago, 04Mach1 said:

If it's got boobs, tracks, or wheels it's going to give you trouble.

 

So very true... :lmao:

 

2 minutes ago, 04Mach1 said:

I'd also recommend a fire extinguisher.

 

Yeah, I've got one in my truck. Never had to use it but its there just in case. 

 

2 minutes ago, 04Mach1 said:

Of the many break downs of various vehicles we had spare parts or mechanics tools never got us home

 

Same here. I've never had exactly what I needed to get rolling again. No, I'm not going to haul another truck on a trailer as insurance or haul tons of tools and parts. 

 

4 minutes ago, 04Mach1 said:

but things like food, warm clothing, matches, etc... kept us alive to get home.

 

So very true. Not my first time camping out in the woods with a dead vehicle. 

 

I learned my lesson long ago. Back with my 1972 Dodge Power Wagon. A friend and I decided to go out for afternoon ride looking for firewood. When we got out on Smokey Boulder Road we seen where everyone drove around the tip of this fallen tree. I followed the same track and down the truck sank in the mud. I lock in my hubs and was hooked on a log. No jack. No tools. No food. No water. Then made the poor choice of trying to dig the truck out by hand. Needless to say it was over 8 hours later in the dark we managed to get the truck unstuck. No matches to get fire lit. No clothes to stay warmer. No gloves to protect my hands. The interior of the truck was covered in mud every where. Ended up damaging a hub fighting to free the truck and chewed up the tires with all the tire spin. (Young and dumb).

 

Now looking back I should of abandon the truck and started walking out. If I had my rescue bag I've got now I could have easily walked two people out with water and food and got to safety and got help to get my truck out of the mud.  Now I don't even fight it anymore. I grab the bag and lock the doors and leave the truck behind. If it is broke down no one can steal the truck. Now you just got to go get help so the truck can be recovered. 

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