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I have a reversable oil fluid pump with several size hoses and adapters or tubing for extracting fluids. Does anyone know if I could use suction on each brake bleed valve as an easy peasy way ? The calipers are very prone to sticking and I hate the way the heat will cook the bearing's grease away. It can get expensive in a hurry if you neglect the brake fluid changes on a regular basis.

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Mayo jar hooked to the bleed and pump straight in the jar. I change brake fluid every 30k miles. Yes I full stroke of the pedal and no problems after 418k miles. I know most say don't do this. Like my 2002 has a aluminum master cylinder and being I make sure to change the fluid before its moisture loaded and rotting the seals. So this is the main reason I don't work about full stroke of the brake pedal. 

 

dodge-rear-axle-disc.jpg.1812d8588feab18

 

Full that gets this dark is loaded with moisture hence why the brake fluid start weakening the seals in the master, wheel cylinders, calipers and even hoses. Again 418k miles and no issues even with brake hoses. 

used-brake-fluid.jpg.efe31bcd45de7dfed42

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negative pressure for bleeding brakes will pull air past the threads on the bleeders. i use my old raptor 150 for oil extraction on the car. works great. get a power bleeder for brakes, one person job works like a champ and its easy

 

https://www.motiveproducts.com/collections/domestic-bleeder-kits/products/chrysler-dodge-mopar-bleeder

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I've had pretty good luck with gravity bleeding on most vehicles, including my 2nd gen. I've changed both front brake lines, but admittedly have not used this method on the rear (I have drums). To gravity bleed, I remove the bleeder completely, and loosen or remove the master cylinder cap (cover with clean rag or paper towel if you choose to remove the cap). I let it bleed through while I clean up the garage, occasionally checking/topping off the master cylinder. No brake pedal pumping required. This keeps me from having the to hunt down the bride or teen. The down side for those that are clean freaks, without the bleeders, there's nothing to slip a hose on to catch the spoils. I usually use an old cool whip dish to catch the drips, but some always gets on the floor with this method. 

I've used this method often, when the fluid is dark.

Edited by jltait
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3 hours ago, 015point9 said:

Last time I bred my brakes there was some fluid. Dot 3 and dot 3, 4 what do you folks using?

I always thought there was something a bit amiss with ya.  Breeding your brakes are ya. Hmmmmmm:think:

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30 minutes ago, dripley said:

I always thought there was something a bit amiss with ya.  Breeding your brakes are ya. Hmmmmmm:think:

 

That's a good one...wished I would of caught that before hitting the button.  Posting is dangerous sometimes.  😀😀

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4 hours ago, 015point9 said:

Last time I bred my brakes there was some fluid. Dot 3 and dot 3, 4 what do you folks using?

I use Dot 4 because it has a higher temperature rating.

 

Man I like the idea of the passive bleed where you just remove the valves and keep the Master cylinder full while it runs out. I wonder though if any water gets settled into the caliper does it need the pump/ pressure to flush it out. Also any air would be in this same question too :think:

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32 minutes ago, 015point9 said:

 

That's a good one...wished I would of caught that before hitting the button.  Posting is dangerous sometimes.  😀😀

Tell me about it. Never ceases to amaze me how many things make people think of chickens. Aaahh ha haaaaaaaa!!!

5 minutes ago, JAG1 said:

I use Dot 4 because it has a higher temperature rating.

 

Man I like the idea of the passive bleed where you just remove the valves and keep the Master cylinder full while it runs out. I wonder though if any water gets settled into the caliper does it need the pump/ pressure to flush it out. Also any air would be in this same question too :think:

I made a vacuum vesel out of an old garden sprayer. Used to drain the diff fluid. Should work on brakes just as well. I turned the vacuum pump on and the fluid was moving. Then about 30 seconds the vacuum on the vesel made it emplode. Might as well thrown an M80 under the truck. Wow!!

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Dot 5 is always an option. It has lasted 30 years so long as the lines don't rust first.

 

That said, I used mopar's method a few days ago. I haven't felt a pedal like that in the truck since I got it. 

 

If I had one, I would use a pressure bleeder. Install the cap, pump it up, open bleeders until air/nasty stops. Takes like 5 minutes for all 4 wheels. Had one when I was working on tanks.

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Posted (edited)

I have a bleeder hose with a one way check ball that you place into a bottle. Check ball makes it so your not having to open/ close the valve depending on pedal direction. I think in order to properly bleed the system though, it needs pressure to flush out impurities I could be wrong on that. A pressure bleeder is a good idea, much simpler and may go to one since I have two trucks that I take care of and my age makes it a little tougher these days.

Edited by JAG1
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3 hours ago, JAG1 said:

I have a bleeder hose with a one way check ball that you place into a bottle. Check ball makes it so your not having to open/ close the valve depending on pedal direction. I think in order to properly bleed the system though, it needs pressure to flush out impurities I could be wrong on that. A pressure bleeder is a good idea, much simpler and may go to one since I have two trucks that I take care of and my age makes it a little tougher these days.

 

Not needed being the weight of the fluid cannot be pulled back up out of the jar. Hence why the mayo jar works so good and doesn't need a helper for the screw and why it can be done solo. No need for pumps, or expensive check valves or special caps for the reservoir.

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I use the gravity bleed method followed with a helper depressing the pedal for a pressure bleed. When flushing fluid i will extract the fluid from the master cylinder with a big syringe and fill it with new fluid. Less time spent to get clean fluid through the system. Usually do this every other year or when i have the lines or hoses off for something else.

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