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I most likely lost the head gasket again from the stupid idea of having 6 pressurized oil slots in a head gasket.   I did pressure test it and I also know a trick for telling the difference between the head gasket and the oil cooler, it’s simple actually.   Anyhow, head planed, Mahle head gasket, 40# boost, ported head, injectors, Governor Springs, 20* timing, Hamilton cam ect.   Any thoughts on an MLS gasket or just silicone the hell out of another gasket and try?  Only other thought is cracked head but I doubt it.

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I have used Indian Head shellac on old school flat heads with copper head gaskets, but I've never heard of someone adding something to these. Are you sure the block/head aren't warped? 

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The only place I used silicone on my truck is around aftermarket head light housing to close the gap. If you're going to use something to seal use rtv gasket maker, I like gray or black. 

On 10/2/2020 at 11:43 AM, Jungledave said:

I did pressure test it and I also know a trick for telling the difference between the head gasket and the oil cooler, it’s simple actually.

I'd like to hear more 

 

On 10/2/2020 at 11:43 AM, Jungledave said:

Any thoughts on an MLS gasket

I'm drawing a blank, what's mls

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How did you prep the block before installing the last new head gasket.

If you used one of those whirly wheel Sandy disc on a die grinder.

You pretty much destroyed the sealing surface on the cylinder block.

When I work for General Motors I replaced a lot of engine blocks..

Due to damage from sanding Wheels creating high and low spots on the Block deck.

Mostly in the area of the crush ring near the combustion chamber.

The best method I have found to clean the block deck.

Is to use a new honing Stone for sharpening knives.

I place rags and all of the cylinder holes to catch any contaminants.

And dip the honing Stone into clean mineral spirits.

And use the stones flat surface did clean off the block.

Any carbon or other material left behind in the porosities.

Is okay will not cause any problems unless it is in the area of this cylinder compression ring seal.

Check the block deck with a straightedge and a light.

I don't suggest using silicone on the head gasket as it will most likely he pushed into the oil orifice if not plugging it.

I would repeat this process on the cylinder head to verify flatness.

After all surfaces have been cleaned and checked.

Use a tap and Chase down all the bolt holes in the block to make sure there is no material that would cause friction and give a false torque.

I usually lightly oil the bolt threads to guarantee I get the actual torque clamping power.

I usually wipe it down with some brake clean to remove any oil residue or other contaminants.

 

Another thing I found that helped is torquing the head gasket down in 20 pound increments.

And letting the headset for 5 or 10 minutes before making the last two passes of the torque pattern.

This will allow any air or soft material to shift around in the gasket time to Settle Inn.

Some head bolts are set with a pre torque of usually 50 pounds or so before going the final quarter of a turn.

I usually start with 20 foot pounds on the first pass with those head bolts and then give it five minutes and bring them up 10 lbs at a time.

Then I let it sit for 10 or 20 minutes.

And retorque to the specification torque prior to the last quarter turn for he bolt stretch.

This particular type head bolt is a one-time-use.

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Like when I did mine I only used a sharpen putty knife to light scrap off the gasket material. Then checked with a straight edge and make sure there was no material left to cause a high spot. Used a vacuum cleaner to suck up all the little bits of gasket material. Then using compressed air blow the cylinders out good making sure there is no material in the cylinders. 

 

 

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Cummins says that the bolts can be reused if they are within their limit.

 

That goes out the window with 20* of timing on a 12v. Stock bolts will not hold that. The rest of the mods are fanning the flames.

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Just now, That Guy said:

Cummins says that the bolts can be reused if they are within their limit.

 

Yeah after all the miles on mine at 350k miles I opted to just upgrade to 425 ARP studs and be done. 

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1 minute ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Like when I did mine I only used a sharpen putty knife to light scrap off the gasket material. Then checked with a straight edge and make sure there was no material left to cause a high spot. Used a vacuum cleaner to suck up all the little bits of gasket material. Then using compressed air blow the cylinders out good making sure there is no material in the cylinders. 

 

 

I usually start off with a sharp gasket scraper or razor blade.

I found using the the honing Stone Works the best you can visually see what is clean.

I do like the idea of using the vacuum cleaner to suck up any fine particulate before flannel wipe down with brake clean

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