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 Just curious as how you all use your block heater. I am of the mind set that the more you use something the faster it will wear out so I try not to over use things if not needed. So that leads to:

 Is it better to leave it plugged in all night or possibly for a day or two at a time or would it be best to just plug in an hour or so before you fire it up?

 Any advantage to either practice?

 This morning the outside temp is 9° so I figured on plugging in an hour before start up today just to aid in warm up and easy cranking. It should start fine without it but I know it will be easier on the engine with a little heat in there.

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When it gets down into the 20's I will either set it up on a timer or just plug in when I get up. 45 minute to an hour will get the block up to around 60* or a bit more. You might experiment with the time needed to get warn. Leaving plugged all night is a waste where I live. 

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In my book 3 hours of heat at near 0F would be a good use of 1.8 kW-hr, or about twenty to thirty cents. In fact, I do that most every night I know it'll be below 30 in the morning because otherwise I'm not even at 120F by the time I hit the freeway on ramp.

 

I live in KC. I don't start my truck and go back inside unless I'm watching it like a hawk!

Edited by LorenS
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I finally got the lead to connect our 240v through a 110v  site transformer ( our worksites have to use 110v)  AS IT KILLS LESS our homes are 240v this kills more

We don't get really cold although right now we have a UK wide weather warning for a little bit of snow possibly 8" or so

I find a 2kw electric heater placed on the drivers floor does a really good job of thawing the windows to the point of not needing the block heater of which I spent £35 on the damn lead :doh: 

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Last winter I was in southern Minnesota and I definitely could tell the difference between plugged in all night versus for just an hour. But, those were the only options I considered as I didn't have a waterproof timer and wasn't about to wake up extra early to save the Comfort or Holiday Inn $1...

21 minutes ago, wil440 said:

our homes are 240v

Are both legs hot, or is it 240V to ground? Our 240V plugs here use both legs hot, just opposite phases. Each is 120V (110 to 120V) to ground. 60 Hz, not that it matters for resistive loads.

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If I was in north Dakota again yea I’d leave it plugged in all night, Regardless of heat loss. But in Oklahoma I only do it 2-3 hrs before I go to work, with it being outside and leaving it plugged in all night it won’t keep the heat very well. 
I don’t think using it will kill the life span, maybe won’t heat as quick.

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20 hours ago, Doubletrouble said:

the more you use something the faster it will wear out

That may be true. However these heating elements have a really long life. They may have a higher Watt Density than an electric over or water heater element, but those sure do last a long time getting used daily.

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  • Board Of Directors

Supposed to be getting a big arctic blast soon. I think Mopar1973Man is going to have AC ripple from shivering so much as he has no firewood. He better get some split and standing up to dry in the entry at least.

 

Anyway I usually plug in at early morning coffee if it's below 30, but if we have an ice storm or snow all night I will plug in the night before to keep the cab warm and keep the snow/ ice melted off the windows.

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 I haven't used mine alot but your saying it will keep the cab warm and ice off the windows overnight? I've never heard that. Maybe I should us it more. Lol 

 I hope Mopar1973man gets some firewood. I've been there before, it sucks. I was out in -10° weather cutting and splitting anything I could find dry enough to burn. Not a good situation.

 

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I haven't plugged in the block heater in over 7 years now. This winter I only paused a few times for the first cold start up waiting for the light. Like right now its 32*F outside I would just fire up and leave. 

 

Not to hijack...:hijack:

 

We got some wood but soaking wet and started splitting yesterday while we could with good weather. All of out working to move rounds for @Jthor then @Wet Vette and myself were picking up and loading a truck to move to the covered wood shed. We got a small pile start but more to come today. Between the death of @MoparMom (Feb. 22, 2020) then the start of the COVID-19 lock down. Closure of most forest and access to wood. Then later in the summer release the forest but I got boom with more work than I could handle. I managed to get 1 trailer load of red fir but that is already fully burned up and gone. Takes roughly about 9 to 12 cords every winter. So I've been running the heat pump set for 65*F and letting @Jthoruse the majority of the wood being the other house has no secondary heat like electric or anything. Wood only heat. 

 

Back to normal threads... :backtotopic:

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 Hopefully you'll find some good dry wood to burn. I use only wood to heat our home as well and know how important it is to have good dry stuff especially when we get a cold snap like now. Temp outside at the moment is 8°, keeping it a nice cozy 68-70 inside.

 We mostly find ash around here, all dead fall stuff but I got lucky and found a dead standing oak of some sort that is nice and dry (23% average) that is burning great. I'll admit though, I have a tough time identifying tree species. I know ash and a couple others but if it's dry it burns.

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2 hours ago, JAG1 said:

Anyway I usually plug in at early morning coffee if it's below 30, but if we have an ice storm or snow all night I will plug in the night before to keep the cab warm and keep the snow/ ice melted off the windows. 

You are talking about an electric heater in the cab right? The block heater wont do that.

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1 hour ago, LorenS said:

The lower part on the passenger side stays amazingly clear if I have timer set too early!

Well I guess one could put a little recirculating pump on the heater line and circulate warm water thru the core. I smell another mod coming.:thumb1:

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  • 3 weeks later...
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We just got our power back and able to participate. What I do is plug in the night before or anytime during a snow/ice storm and it keeps the windows clear of snow/ ice when you open the dash defrost vents. Only a wee bit warmer in the cab which means in my climate the doors aren't covered in ice to where I can't get the doors open. Like this last ice storm both trucks got glazed with an inch of ice because they were not plugged in and power went out. We had a warm rain move over ground temps of 25 degrees. Trees down power out for 9 days. It crippled a lot of areas out my way.

Edited by JAG1
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