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NV4500 oil type


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  • Owner

I dropped all the high price junk fluids (Mopar, Redline, AMSOil, Etc.)... I switched over to a synthetic 50 SAE used in Eaton Fuller 10 speed transmissions. So far had good results and no issues. The whole scare about it be too thick or affecting syncros is not true. Shift quality is great. I've used both Mobil 50 SAE Transmission Fluid and now using Valvoline 50 SAE Transmission fluid. No issues. I'm planning soon to drop the fluid out of Thor which is a G56 transmission (6 speed) and get rid of that junk ATF+4 and load it with Valvoline 50 SAE transmission fluid. I've done this for a previous customer as well and he loves it. 

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  • Owner

Only thing that is required that it is a GL-4 lubricant. 

 

I would suggest that you don't attempt to use the same factory weight of oil. Factory suggested viscosity I will say it too thin. Especially if you work your transmission heavy like I do. For sure add a transmission temperature gauge. I will admit I've ran a few times as high as 240*F which cause my last failure being the lube was too thin and started breaking down the viscosity and then taking the hard facing off the gears. 50 weight engine oil is equal to 90 weight gear lube. 75W-85 is equal to 10w30 engine oil just think when the temps rise to 200*F it does get get rather thin. 

 

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Edited by Mopar1973Man
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  • Owner
On 1/20/2023 at 12:47 PM, ruben121 said:

I rather ask here than pars store or google, what kind of oil does a nv4500 get? and how many quarts ?

 

NV4500 is 4 quarts of transmission fluid has to be at least GL-4 but not GL-5 also a synthetic.I suggest away from any thin fluids like the factory 75w-85, PennzOil Syncromesh, etc. It you work your truck and haul heavy loads I suggest you get something a bit thicker.

 

For my truck I'm typically on dirt roads hauling firewood up and down steep grades ranging from 7% to at least 16% grades. Just to give you a sample just hauling over to Pittsburgh Landing on the Snake River with my RV the road speed limit is 15 MPH and there is little to no air flow under the truck, I've got a heat shield between the exhaust and gear box. Still push well past 220*F even running down hill. 75w-85 will turn to water and will not protect the gears faces. Hence why I broke input shaft gear, counter shaft gear, 5th gear (both). When things get hot you need thicker fluids to protect. 

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  • Staff

 @Mopar1973Man, that being said, would the thicker fluid still be fine in a moderately worked truck? I daily drive mine and a few times a year pull our 10k fifth wheel. I doubt i would create the same amount of heat.

 I plan on changing trans, transfer case and both diff fluids come summer as well as flushing the P/S system. 

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  • Owner

Here is the key question do you have a transmission temperature gauge? You'll never know till you do. During the summer I can be near 200°F empty on the highway. 

 

Ignorance is bliss if you know what I mean. After the first failure I installed the gauge and found that thin fluids are not going to hold up. Faster you go the hotter it gets. The heavier your loaded the hotter it gets. Now consider loaded and traveling fast it is even hotter than the either.

 

Till you have a gauge you'll never know.

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  • Owner

Give a few examples...

 

Hauling my RV over to Pittsburg Landing road is speed limit to 15 MPH. Trans temp was reaching 240°F climbing and even continued to be hot going down the back side still at 15 MPH.

 

Trip to Bridgeport CA I was bucking head winds at 60 MPH hauling the RV trans temp would climb to 200°F I would back down to 50 MPH and drop to 4th and it would cool right off.

 

Summer time running empty at 80 MPH on I84 towards Boise ID and trans temps would rise heading towards 200°F but as soon as I hit 65 MPH speed zone it would start to drop back towards 150-160°F which it normal.

 

Like now with winter time and cold temps it takes a long time to rise off 100°F mark and barely gets over 110°F on 70 mile round trip to McCall.

 

As for the miles I've traveled with 50 SAE trans fluid no shift issues. Smooth easy shift typically shift with 2 fingers. Doesn't matter the temp outside. Doesn't impact shift performance at all. All the myths of syncro damage. Nope... Doesn't affect the syncros at all.

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