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Alright, so I'm gonna get my A/C evacuated so I can pull the dash and replace the heater core. The problem is, how do I disconnect the A/C lines that go to the evaporator? I thought there was a simple trick to do them and could avoid buying the line disconnect tools, but I do not remember what the trick was. Or is there a trick? :think:

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Thanks Mike. I took it to an auto shop and the guy evac'ed my A/C system. I got the system charged last year and when he evac'ed it, he said he only pulled out 1/2 a pound out of 2 pounds!So I got a leak going on somewheres. Hoping it is something small. He said I probably have a leak at the compressor where the lines connect to it. O-rings? I called O'reilly's and they said there are 3 different o-rings listed for it and they are color coded and also do not say how many are needed.The guy was nice enough to disconnect my lines for me with his tools. So I did not need to buy any. But I just called NAPA and they had them for $12.Also, do I need to replace my accumulator, or is it not a big deal? I just can't see where this water and an particulate goes if it does not drain? I have no idea if it has ever been replaced either.Just trying to get an idea of anything that I should do while the system is not charged...

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Actually accumulator and the orfice tube (high pressure pipe) should be replaced. The accumulator has the drier in it and the orfice tube has filter in it. As for the seal kit it cost me about $10 bucks for the seal kit from NAPA.As for the compressor I would pull it out and drain the oil from it and then pick up a 8oz bottle of PAG oil and reload it. This way you know for sure the compressor is properly loaded with oil. :wink:

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As for the compressor I would pull it out and drain the oil from it and then pick up a 8oz bottle of PAG oil and reload it. This way you know for sure the compressor is properly loaded with oil. :wink:

I thought the oil circulated with the freon? The oil stays in the compressor? I thought they put oil in it when they charge it?
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In the 2001 FSM page 24-57 plumbing section, has a chart with the amount of oil (theoretically) in each component. If I replace any of those components, I use a hypodermic needle to squirt that amount of oil in the component when I replace it. The oil moves freely so where it is after it is operated is really a guess. Again "theoretically" the AC guys say that the amount of oil changes differently, based on whether it was a "slow" leak or Sudden decompression. (I understand it as, a slow overtime leak carries very little oil with it. A sudden decompression (accident etc) carries much more of the oil with it.)HTHHag

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What's bad is after fighting with freon leaks for so long I found my compressor had less the 1 oz of oil in it. :stuned:

Compressor hold 7.1 Ozs (210 cc) so knowing the compressor is low the rest of the system would have less too. So I added the 8 oz bottle and never looked back.

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Wow,I way over estimated it then... You take out the 4 bolts that are perpendicular to the block that hold the compressor to the bracket? It doesn't look like there is room for the bolts to come out between the frame. Or do you just loosen it and leave the bolts in the compressor?Thanks,Hag

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lmao,It was the 4 compressor bolts that was gettin' me. Didn't picture leaving them in the compressor as it dropped off. I was going "how do you get those out? Jack the motor off the mounts?". Didn't think of it until I was 'splainin' it to you!! you are sneaky.Hag

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Well, I got the condenser, accumulator and compressor removed. Got the orifice tube/line removed. Only thing that sits in the bay still is the lines that hooked up to the compressor. The name of it escapes me...Now, I can get an idea of what gaskets, seals I need to get to redo the system...Pulling the compressor off was not quit as easy for me. I had to take a cheater pipe to be able to apply enough force to break the compressor bolts loose. I dunno how the heck I'm ever gonna be able to retorque them down... Hopefully I have a crowsfoot that will work.I had to remove the downpipe from the turbo outlet to get access to the bolts on the top. Unfortunately, I think I'm gonna have to start a new thread on that subject. :banghead:I'm a little confused on what seals I need to completely redo the system...

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All of the seals. All quick joints should have two O-rings. Then there is 2 washer seals on the compressor.As for the compressor I did it with a box end wrench and no cheater pipe on my back laying in the grass. As for breaking loose I used a ratchet and extension through the holes in the frame to break them loose. But assembly I just normally tighten them up and moved on... :wink:

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has far has leaks go..when i removed the cap where you add freon...that valve core was leaking...some soap in a squirt bottle is all you need..while the truck is running with the a.c. on squirt all the connections with that to verify leaks...

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All of the seals. All quick joints should have two O-rings. Then there is 2 washer seals on the compressor. As for the compressor I did it with a box end wrench and no cheater pipe on my back laying in the grass. As for breaking loose I used a ratchet and extension through the holes in the frame to break them loose. But assembly I just normally tighten them up and moved on... :wink:

I checked O'reilly's for A/C, o-rings/seals and they had a generic o-ring pack. They did not have the compressor seal washers. I dunno where I can get them? I will try NAPA in the meantime. Otherwise, I have no idea where to get them. The one I took in to show them, I notices was breaking down so I cannot reuse them! I guess I need to grab someone with some big arms like you, Mike!

has far has leaks go..when i removed the cap where you add freon...that valve core was leaking...some soap in a squirt bottle is all you need..while the truck is running with the a.c. on squirt all the connections with that to verify leaks...

I can do that, but I need to get it all back together first, lol. Usually they will add the dye to the system though to check for leaks...
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As for leak checking you can take compressed air and fill the system enough to run the compressor and pump the dye around. I just fire up the truck with the A/C on and using a air gun with a rubber tip I fill the system on the low pressure side till the compressor runs. Then I let it run for 5 minutes of so... This is to get the oil / dye mix and push through the system. Then I'll park the truck in a darkened shop and grab the black light and go hunting for green dye. Also check and see how long it holds that pressure you added.post-2-138698189262_thumb.jpgAfter I'm done hunting... I place the system on a vacuum for over 15 minutes to draw out any moisture that the compressed air might of had. I'll normally will do a vacuum test as well after pulling a vacuum I will check and see how long it holds vacuum.If all 3 test dye, pressure and vacuum are good... I pull one last vacuum on it and then charge it up...

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HAHA! That is a cool pic! That stuff really lights up in the blacklight!So, I was fortunate enough to go to the local A/C repair guy and got my washers and seals. I discussed things over with him and he said the most I should need to do is an accumulator. He said if it was running fine before and your not having compressor problems, then there is no reason to worry about all the other stuff, really.So, I got me a new accumulator on order through NAPA. Lifetime warranty. Will be here in the morning... Once I finish the heater core project deal, I'll get it back to him and he can deal with charging it and putting oil in it. I would rather place the liability on him since I'm paying him anyways to put in the right amount. He does it more than I do. If something does not seem right, its on him, not me, lol.

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Mike,That is not a bad idea on the compressed air. We do a quick pull down with the vacuum, to see if we have a huge leak, if not then we pressure test it to "normal max" system pressure. We use Nitrogen for pressure testing for two reasons. The Nitrogen is DRY. Nearly 100%. That helps hammer a bit more of the water out. Also since a Nitrogen tank is over 1000psi, it is not hard to test the system at 150 psi. Plus we are not adding air compressor oil or mud daubers to the AC system. A couple hours at pressure and no leak, we are pretty certain it will hold. Pull it down again and weigh in the freon.On a side note.... We have tried unsuccessfully to pull a deep vacuum on an automotive system. Getting below 500 microns and holding it seems impossible. It could be that the compressor seal is just not perfect. (we have yet to try a deep vacuum with a "new" compressor. just our old junk.)

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