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MAN! So today I got the trailer hooked up and took it out on the road! :ahhh:I can't back it up to save my life. :doh:I did better backing at our destination, but now I done a number on the grass...I planned the route taken to avoid many things, one of them being the bridges... Except when I got about 2/3, 3/4 the through the trip, it started POURING!It was quit the first trailering experience...My trailer is 8'8" wide. The tow mirrors don't get me planed out with the trailer. I can still see behind me, but not straight back...You can definitely tell it IS BACK THERE!I have learned too much in trip already...I estimate 305 horsies with my mods. Making a grade, it started making alot of heat and peaked at 25 psi, just under 1000 on the pyro. Trans temp. was good at 135-140 on grade. I think I need to step up to a larger turbo, one above stock... Maybe I can chip it instead and that would help?Coming down, hit the trailer brakes on the controller a little instead of the fat pedal.Backing in at our destination was a little rough. I was trying to negotiate the turn and I was watching the trailer approach the back of the cab. The bottom of the front ended up rubbing on the bed rail. Did not see it as the back seat blocked my view. I thought, "OH CRAP!" :mad:Backed out of it and took a look at the damage. Got a slight dent in the rail and a scuff on the trailer. Think mr. clean magic eraser should fix the scuff. A slide hammer on the bed rail should help... :cry:My biggest issue at the moment is the trans. temp. I dunno how long it went on for, but I did not look until after assessing the damage. It got up to 220, I think. I thought I read it should never go over 200. I did not think for the slightest moment it would get so hot backing it in. I'm definitely going to add an aux cooler! I took a look at the trans. fluid. Checked out, did not smell burnt.I spent probably 10-15 min. cumulatively to get the temps. down and stay below 200. One small negotiation at a time...I also cannot figure out a noise that occurs as well. I'm thinking its possibly some slop in the hitch head jaw and the pin, or the little bit of slop the sliding hitch has on the hitch itself. Just a little front and back movement. I can't figure it out. I start moving, and just maybe 1-2 seconds after starting to move it will make the noise. Its not consistently every time either. It also was happening some times at stopping as well.Is that a normal occurance for the superglide?Well, I got about 115 miles or so on a 1/4 tank with this beast!Got a little grayer, too.... :ahhh:I'm here still!

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Was your TC locked when the temps got up to 220? If I am running too low of an rpm to stay in OD I'll generally knock it out with the OD button and run third up to around 2300 to 2400 if I have a heavy load. Third gear locks up that way and it really helps to keep trans temps in check. I hate to say it but I was in the same boat as you until recently with 3.55 Gears and 285/75/16 tires. With the extra tire your giving yourself an even higher gear ratio, I'm sure your aware of that as was I. But I never really realized how much it affected my towing until I picked up a set of 4th gen takeoffs with the factory tire size (265/70/17) My original intentions were to sell the tires as they only had 10k miles on them and step up to a taller tire. But after towing and general driving for a couple of months Ive decided I'm just going to keep them and run them. The truck just feels "lighter" at the steering wheel and the smaller tires got my rpm's back up by 100-200 which is an advantage when your running heavy. I save my 285s for this time of year when I'm out in the fields and running oil field leases for my friend. You still have a little wiggle room on the egt's I've held 1100 to 1200 sustained on some decent hills as long as you stay at or below thaT you will be fine. With my little 40 horse injectors and my Smarty I can easily peg 35 psi but generally run 25-30 on a steep grAde.

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Ah... Someone sees my logic. This why I run 235/85 R16's for towing. I can get more torque and power to the ground and less heat on the transmission. So the bigger the tires the more stress is placed on the transmission so more heat is generated. 80-90% of my driving is done with these better MPG numbers here. Also for the same reason I've got a set of 265/75 R16 Cooper STT's hidden in the shop for offroad and firewood gathering these give me the traction for slick muddy roads. Only about 10 percent of my road time on these being they cost me roughly 2-3 MPG more to roll them.

I think I need to step up to a larger turbo, one above stock... Maybe I can chip it instead and that would help?

Just ditching those 285's will gain you everything you looking for. Just remember I'm still running STOCK 3" exhaust, STOCK HX35W turbo, with Edge Comp (5x3) and +50 Injectors which has me really close to the 400 HP mark. No EGT problems here and more than enough power to break the tires loose in 2nd or 3rd gear even hitched up. Your biggest loss is in the tires nothing more. Like my last run less than a week ago. http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/7737-Back-to-stock-injectors-for-a-short-time?p=75277#post75277
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I agree too, bigger tires are hurting you. I am not an automatic trans guy, but if I remember right those trans don't circulate fluid in park. You would have to shift to neutral to circulate it though the cooler. With my mods I don't see much over 1000 towing, normal cruising with the trailer I see 800 to 850 at 60 mph. I have a Reese fifth wheel hitch(non slider) and it creaks and stuff. Mostly stopping and starting and turning. Last night I was using the trailer(32ft enclosed trailer w/ living quarters) to move a friend to his new house and his brother was riding with me. He asked about the creaking and noise too. You just have to get use to the trailer and will get more comfortable with it the more you use it.

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Well Grasshopper, practice practice practice and do it some more before hand in an empty lot with cones.As far as your tranny temp no amount of extra cooler is gonna help due to the fact you are trying to back a heavy load and in 1st and reverse there is no lockup and you are in full stall mode which makes the most heat very fast. There is no air movement through the coolers and things get "Heat soaked" and it takes even longer to cool off then. What oil do you have in the tranny? standard oil is good for 230 for short periods but will need to be changed out sooner, synthetics will handle temps over 240 for longer periods without damage but if you get things that hot regularly even synthetics need more frequent changing. As stated best to leave it on fast idle in neutral with a stick for the throttle ect to keep the rpms up around 1200-1500 to help cool it faster.

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I missed the part where you mentioned the trans temp getting up that hot while mamaneuvering the trailer until W&F mentioned it so scratch my earlier questions. What you could do in that situation when maneuvering at slow speeds in reverse and 1st is use 4 low it will give you a much better mechanical advantage and you won't be putting anywhere near the stress on your trans. Going a step further would be to do a 2 low mod. A member was recently touching on this issue with his 6 speed and I posted a few pics of my cheap home made 2 low mod. it only cost me around 40. Bucks all together and I find myself using it a lot now that I have it. I will see if I can find the thread later.

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The whole trip I kept the OD lockout on. The only time I shut it off was when I was in 3rd gear lockup and going too slow for it. With my valve body mod, I think its changed the way the truck shifts and thats one thing it seems to do. If I go too slow in 3rd gear lockup when it engages it will shudder.I watched my trans. temp as close as possible and did as much as possible as accordingly to keep temps low. Funny how it works though. I could see the trans. temp lower when it locked up, but then egt's and coolant goes up. Coolant was not a problem. It only rose to probably 5 or so degrees past halfway line.One thing I noticed was on the first grade I took, I did not get a "running start" with it. I hit the hill and put the pedal down. But it got to a point that the boost peaked, and the engine started to sound like it just started to just make heat. Thats when the egts got to about 1000. But during this time trans. temp was fine and could hold it about 45-50. Was not expecting that...I think that if I could get an edge comp back, it would probably really help. I got rid of mine after rebuilding the tranny. The owner of the shop said get rid of it, that will be the death of your tranny. But I would assume that using it responsibly and watching temp. it should be fine. :shrug:I may be able to look at smaller tires when I get things in order more and/or need to replace these tires. They are still pretty new so I should still have alot of life left in them. I'm wondering though, these are load range E tires, with a capacity rating of 3750 lbs. at 80psi. If I go to a smaller tire in this load range, will I still keep my capacity rating of 3750?Owners manual for truck says shift into neutral and rev engine a little higher than idle. I'm just curious as to what damage or life I have shortened the fluid/tranny by with it getting so hot?I think I have a good idea as to what the noise was that I was hearing towing it. Looking at it today with the light out, I think it may be the wear/stopping block on the back of the hitch. Its in a slotted hole and moves back and forth. It has a bolt with a stop nut to adjust the block movement. I think if I tighten that up a bit it should keep it from banging back and forth... I'm gonna call pullrite on Tuesday to make sure though. Time to refer to the owners manual!When I do get a chance, I will be taking it to a lot and try and get some schooling done. I remember reading that to back a trailer up, put your hand on the bottom of the steering wheel and turn the wheel the way you want the trailer to turn. Biggest issue I was having was over compensating to turn...What does stall mean? I remember reading about it for TC's, but I still do not understand it! I figured that the heat soak is what was causing my temps to shoot up so quick after cooling it down. Cause after cooling it, just making a small movement it shot back up.Would not an aux cooler with an electric fan in it not work? Thats air movement for it, right? I've got regular ATF fluid in it. Its the next fluid on my list to change out to Amsoil synthetic, though.I will definitely give 4 low a try next time when backing. I did not even think about that! :doh:I thought the 2 low was only for people who did not like the lurching? I would like to probably do that now, just because in 4 low, I do not want the front 2 tires grabbing if backing on non-slippery surfaces...YES! When you find the thread, post it! :thumbup2:

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The 4 or 2 wheel low gives you better mechanical advantage and works everything a little less. Another way to think when backing is, if you want the trailer to go to the left steer to the right. You want to go right steer to the left. The trick is learning when to following it up so you dont over steer. That is one that just comes with practice. I still over steer mine sometimes and just have to pull up a little to regain the angle you are looking for. Happens to all of us some times.

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I'm wondering though, these are load range E tires, with a capacity rating of 3750 lbs. at 80psi.

I was running a 235/85 R16 Load Range G tires (14 ply tire) with with weight rating of 3,750 at 110 PSI... :whistle: But 3,750 x 2 = 7,500 axle weight which is beyond the 3/4 ton ratings (6,084# RAWR) http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/4182-Aluminum-Rim-Failure/page2
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One question is where are you measuring the tranny temps at? If you saw 220 in the pan it was already deep frying normal oil as it was probably leaving the converter at 250 or so. If measuring at the hot line directly out of the converter you were still fine. Problem with the auxiliary cooler with a fan is that you are super heating the oil during the stalling and it may take a bit more heat out in the bigger picture in a maneuvering situation where you are getting things really hot it is not worth the extra expense and clutter to add one, they are more for around town driving and non lockup road driving more than stall maneuvering.I wouldn't worry about tranny damage if this was the first time doing it, if it was done on a regular basis then you got an issue and as posted low rage is your friend since you have little experience as a trucker.:tongue:

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The 4 or 2 wheel low gives you better mechanical advantage and works everything a little less. Another way to think when backing is, if you want the trailer to go to the left steer to the right. You want to go right steer to the left. The trick is learning when to following it up so you dont over steer. That is one that just comes with practice. I still over steer mine sometimes and just have to pull up a little to regain the angle you are looking for. Happens to all of us some times.

Thanks for the tip!

I was running a 235/85 R16 Load Range G tires (14 ply tire) with with weight rating of 3,750 at 110 PSI... :whistle: But 3,750 x 2 = 7,500 axle weight which is beyond the 3/4 ton ratings (6,084# RAWR) http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/4182-Aluminum-Rim-Failure/page2

Wow, you would think a load range G tire would allow more weight capacity? Whats the benefit of it seeming to take more air pressure to reach a lower capacity rating compared to my tires, for instance? I have a weight ticket at home, I'll have to do the math, but I think it said it would allow me another 3,400 lbs. on the rear axle before I reached RAWR. As for my rims, I dunno what they are rated for! They are not stockers. :think:

One question is where are you measuring the tranny temps at? If you saw 220 in the pan it was already deep frying normal oil as it was probably leaving the converter at 250 or so. If measuring at the hot line directly out of the converter you were still fine. Problem with the auxiliary cooler with a fan is that you are super heating the oil during the stalling and it may take a bit more heat out in the bigger picture in a maneuvering situation where you are getting things really hot it is not worth the extra expense and clutter to add one, they are more for around town driving and non lockup road driving more than stall maneuvering. I wouldn't worry about tranny damage if this was the first time doing it, if it was done on a regular basis then you got an issue and as posted low rage is your friend since you have little experience as a trucker.:tongue:

I have the new isspro trans temp. kit. It uses a bracket that has 3 diff. holes on it to allow for diff. trans lines. Tighten the sender in the threads of the bracket and it mounts to the line. I have it measuring at a line coming out of the tranny. It was discussed in another thread. Alright, so then there is another question to pose to you W&F. I would like to take this into the mountains. It will obviously be slow going on a mountain road. Alot of it is going to be an ascending drive. Would I need an aux. cooler for this situation then, consider the trans. will not be in lockup and its low speed? As for the trucker comment: :moon::thumbup2::lmao: I don't wanna be a trucker and get fat...
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Generally speaking the wider the tire the higher the capacity. If you look at an E rated tire in OEM size its capacity will be around 3200 lbs vs a 285 tire with an additional 500 lbs capacity (approximately) The only way to stick with a narrower shorter tire and maintain the higher ratings is to increase capacity to a 12-14 ply. I would bet your very close to max RAWR with your new rig.

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Wow, you would think a load range G tire would allow more weight capacity? Whats the benefit of it seeming to take more air pressure to reach a lower capacity rating compared to my tires, for instance? I have a weight ticket at home, I'll have to do the math, but I think it said it would allow me another 3,400 lbs. on the rear axle before I reached RAWR. As for my rims, I dunno what they are rated for! They are not stockers. :think:

Truck RAWR: 6,084# Load Range E's 3,042# x 2 tire = 6,084# Little inflation math using my trucks weights. 2,860# / 2 = 1,430# / 3,042# = 0.47 x 80 PSI = 37.6 PSI 2,860# / 2 = 1,430# / 3,750# = 0.38 x 110 PSI = 41.9 PSI Not really all the different...
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