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Looking at going to 19.5" wheels and tires.


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I am considering going to 19.5s on my 3rd gen 3500 4x4. Looking for higher weight carrying capacity than I can get in the 17" wheel and tire combo. I am currently running Michelin LTX 2 and am very pleased with the traction I get in wet, snow and ice and am very concerned in finding something in a 19.5 traction tire that will at least provide a reasonable amount of traction. I am thinking I need an open shoulder style rather than a closed shoulder style.I am considering the Vision 81 machined aluminum wheel which is rated for 5k pounds. Looking at several brands of tires (Double Coin RLB1, Cooper Roadmaster rm253, Toyo 608, Yokahama TY303, Hankook DH01) to name a few of the more reasonably priced 245/70/19.5. Anyone had any experience on 19.5 traction tires (good or bad) that you are willing to share. What are good brands to consider. Most truck tires are getting pretty high mileage (I am told 80k-120k) so I would expect the tires to time out from age rather than wear out due to mileage.I know the sidewalls will be stiff and the ride will be more rough when I am not loaded but I am hoping to stay away from tires that's sing too much or are not reliable.Any input?

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I'll say this, stay away from double coin tires, they are cheap but are also a piece of crap. We've had many problems with them at work.I'm not sure if it's available in 19.5 or not but the Kelly KDA is a good tire and worth looking into, it's what we prefer to run in the drive position on the semis at work. It's been getting great tread wear and the drivers say it grips good in the winter.

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I think I will get one more season out of my Michelin's, and then I am going to 19.5's. The Type 81 is the only thing available, AFIK, and I plan to get the OEM Black ones. I am looking at the Toyo M608Z. I would prefer a LRF tire, but they are LRG in a 245. IF I can find a decent tire in 245 with a good traction, like you are looking for, in a LRF I might consider it. A co-worker has the M608Z in 245 on his 2010 2500 with Type 81's. He loves them, and hasn't had any winter complaints.

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I think I will get one more season out of my Michelin's, and then I am going to 19.5's.

The Type 81 is the only thing available, AFIK, and I plan to get the OEM Black ones.

I am looking at the Toyo M608Z. I would prefer a LRF tire, but they are LRG in a 245.

IF I can find a decent tire in 245 with a good traction, like you are looking for, in a LRF I might consider it.

A co-worker has the M608Z in 245 on his 2010 2500 with Type 81's. He loves them, and hasn't had any winter complaints.

John; I know YOU have several, if not more, good reasons for doing this, but I have to point out the potential negatives here also!!!!:smart:

1. Initial rim cost

2. 19.5" tires cost more vs. a comparable load rated 17" tire

3. 19.5" tires are hard to find..........especially if really needed..............like NOW!!

4. Limited sizes available

5. More rotating mass=decreased mileage

6. More rotating mass=increased stress on an already "near at-the-limit" front end on our '04.5+ trucks

7. IMHO, they look really bad

Sorry, couldn't help but add #7!!!!!:lmao::lmao2::smart:

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John; I know YOU have several, if not more, good reasons for doing this, but I have to point out the potential negatives here also!!!!:smart:

1. Initial rim cost

2. 19.5" tires cost more vs. a comparable load rated 17" tire

3. 19.5" tires are hard to find..........especially if really needed..............like NOW!!

4. Limited sizes available

5. More rotating mass=decreased mileage

6. More rotating mass=increased stress on an already "near at-the-limit" front end on our '04.5+ trucks

7. IMHO, they look really bad

Sorry, couldn't help but add #7!!!!!:lmao::lmao2::smart:

1. No different than an aftermarket 18" rim (going for load rating), maybe cheaper, and stronger with good load ratings.

2. Not enough more to be an issue, especially when you break it down to cost per mile. Slightly higher initial cost, with a longer life.

3. They are close enough to obtain quickly, and in 17 years of driving I have never needed a tire NOW.

4. They have sizes that work perfectly for a range of trucks, so again a non issue. In fact I think the sizing is superior to 17" availability.

5. Nearly every account shows increased fuel mileage. The tires are stiffer and have lower rolling resistance, enough that highway mileage increases. Tires flexing under load really increases the rolling resistance. Operating the tires at 95%-100%+ of rated weight produces a noticeable amount of sidewall flex while driving, one you eliminate that the tire rolls easier.

6. With the upgrades I have done this again is a non issue.

7. I like the look, but I have always preferred the taller skinnier tire. I think my 255/80's look much better than my 265/70s.

The bottom line is that 17" tires have a poor selection when it comes to decent load rating short of a 34-35" tire. There are adequately sized 18" tires that have a 3600-3900 lb load rating, but that also involves new rims and tires that have a softer compound and wear out very quickly.

There is a tire or two that offer 3750 lbs/tire in 285/70, but I really didn't like how the 285's fit the OE rim width. It took constant tire pressure adjustment for load to wear evenly.

19.5" setups are medium duty, designed for more torque, more weight, and longer life. On a truck that weighs 8200-8400 empty and puts 800+ ft/lbs to the ground I think it's a no-brainer.

IMHO there are 2 drawbacks. The biggest, maybe, is that all medium duty tires have a 75 mph speed rating. Not that I do over 75 very often, and when I do it's only 80, but that is what it is. I did talk to some of the local big tire shops and they have never heard of a single speed related issue, even if the tire was overloaded. My heaviest load to date would only put the rear tires at 83% of the load rating.

The second drawback is the offset puts the tire out a little more. I don't think it's enough to effect chain fitment, so I am not to concerned. It will add stability.

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You have probably never noticed, but I tend to over prepare for things :cookoo:

The OCD in my preventative maintenance and preparations will probably lead to me purchasing a 5th tire and wheel for a spare. I like to have 2 spares for certain trips, and having a full size spare is a nice thing when your a long ways from home with the family. I mean why buy 4 wheels/tires when you can buy a 5th for 25% more money :doh:

- - - Updated - - -

As far as #7 goes I have seen some trucks where they look factory, 4th Gen's, and some where they look goofy. The worst I have seen is on a megacab without flaps or fender flares. That truck, I see it often, looks like they stick out a good 3-4" more than the other trucks I have seen.

All in all I think they will match my truck well, especially powder coated black.

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  • 5 months later...

Well I have finally got the 19.5s installed.  I went with the Vision Type 81 wheels in bright aluminum.  I had the wheels powder coated in clear and boy did they turn out nice.  I believe this coating will make the wheels easier to clean and will protect them from road crap and chemicals.  Sure beats the clear coat that comes on the wheels.

 

post-558-0-46331400-1394847942_thumb.jpgpost-558-0-10419600-1394847995_thumb.jpg

 

I decided to go with a steer tread rather than a traction drive tread as I am only planning to use the 19.5s in the spring, summer and fall.  In the winter I will put on my 17s with Michelin LTX M/S2 tires as I won't be carrying the heavy camper in the winter time and the Michelins work very well in the snow and ice.  So I chose the Hankook AH11 in 245x70Rx19.5 and in LRG.

 

post-558-0-65439900-1394848544_thumb.jpgpost-558-0-86130300-1394848598_thumb.jpg

 

First impressions are that I can feel the road a bit more than my Michelins.  Can't tell any difference in starting and stopping, but in reality I haven't been driving it hard. I have about 100 miles on them and drove it on the freeway as well.  Drives straight as a string.  I was a little concerned in that some people have reported the 19.5s don't seem to track well until they have 1k-2k miles on them.

 

It gives the truck a different look.  Fills the wheel well out.

 

post-558-0-32034800-1394848834_thumb.jpg

Edited by War Eagle
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Lookin good! How much of an offset do those wheels have? Is it noticeable from the front?

 

I have the exact same truck cap for my 2nd gen. Love the extra head room it has over a conventional cap, comes in really handy. The only downside is it does not match my truck but I am going to scuff it up and spray it this spring.

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Lookin good! How much of an offset do those wheels have? Is it noticeable from the front?

 

I have the exact same truck cap for my 2nd gen. Love the extra head room it has over a conventional cap, comes in really handy. The only downside is it does not match my truck but I am going to scuff it up and spray it this spring.

The Vision Type 81 wheels have zero offset.  They do stick out of the wheel well some.  See below picture.

 

post-558-0-33618700-1394936522_thumb.jpg

 

Many people will add a mudflap to keep the crap off the body. 

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Wheels were $180 each at Discount tires x 5 = $900 + the govenors tax.

 

Tires were $1750 for 5 with mounting and balance at Bruneel Tire.   Total was under $2700 for my install.

 

Look nice but, I thought I spend a bunch of money at $1,100 for my rims and tires. :spend:

 

I'm really curious of the long term use of the tire and performance. If the tire wears longer and handles snow and ice with good characteristics I would be all for converting to 19.5 tires. I'm like AH64ID in a lot of ways because of my constant on and off roads and travelling dirt roads tend to chew tires up rather quickly.

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Whoa! Man those are some spendy tires! Not bad for the rims, though!

Ya, tell me about it!  The mounting and balancing on the commercial truck tires are more complex than the LT tires and costs much more than the same work on a LT tire.  The tires (depending on brand, style and grade) in the 19.5 can run up to $700 per tire.

 

But tires aren't cheap.  Even the Michelin 265x70Rx17 LTX M/S2 tires that I have been running are pushing $1300 for 5 of them.

 

The commercial truck tires get better life than the LT tires.  It is not uncommon for commercial truck tires to get 100k-200k miles depending how they are used.  I don't know for sure how many miles I will get with these tires yet but I am fully expecting it to be in the range of 100k +.  But time will tell.

 

If this is true then most LT owners will have bought at least two sets of tires in this same time frame. 

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Look nice but, I thought I spend a bunch of money at $1,100 for my rims and tires. :spend:

 

I'm really curious of the long term use of the tire and performance. If the tire wears longer and handles snow and ice with good characteristics I would be all for converting to 19.5 tires. I'm like AH64ID in a lot of ways because of my constant on and off roads and travelling dirt roads tend to chew tires up rather quickly.

Ya, when you get into the commercial truck tire sizes the money required increases.  The wheel and tire carrying capability go up and so does the cost to get it.  These wheels are rated at 4500 puonds per wheel and the tires in LRG are rated at 4900+ pounds per tire. 

 

Just can't get anything standard (tire or wheel) in any size under 19.5 that is rated to carry that weight. 

 

I have not read any reviews about the various brands and style of 19.5 tires that seems to say you will have great snow and ice traction with these tires.  Now traction tread (drive tires) will certainly work better that hiway tread (steer tires) in the snow and ice.  But I believe there are much better performing snow and ice tires available in the standard LT tire  sizes of 16" and 17" etc.

 

So in my case I made the decision to keep my 17" tires with Michelin LTX M/S2 tires and use them for my winter driving when I am not carrying heavy loads in my truck.  I decided to put a hiway tread (steer tire) on my 19.5 for the rest of the year when I need to carry heavy loads.  The hiway tread has longer life and the cost is lower than the traction tread in the 19.5 size.

 

Can't tell you how long they will last but based on my reseach and reading reviews and talking to users I am looking for 100k+ on these tires.  However, it is entirely possible that these tires may need to be replaced based on age rather than mileage if I don't put something like 20k+ a year on them.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Lemme see if i got this right. You spent 2700 on rims n tires that should last 100k.

I get 60+ out of my tires. At 980$ for 4 of them I get 120k for less then yours.

The added load capability is nice though. I couldn't justify the the expense. But to each his own.

I do like the looks of them though. Maybe some takeoffs from the newer trucks. But to outright buy them I could not.

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I get about 30K miles out of my LRE 17" tires, 5 of them, at around 1200-1300. If I get 60K miles out of $2,000 worth of tires I am ahead and it doesn't take long to pay the wheels off. Aside from the speed rating they so far are superior in every way to LT tires.

 

There are no SRW takeoffs.

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