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Bushwaker fender flares

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Hi guys a guy sold me a used set of fender flares. I am looking at putting them on my truck, originally the kit comes with a rubber trim piece that has adhesive that sticks to the truck and then goes over the edge of the plastic fender flare to protect the truck. Since these are used the adhesive is long gone but I have the rubber stops still. So my question is are they any suggestion on a kind of double sided tape or anything to attach the strips to the truck.Sent from my RM-820_nam_att_100 using Tapatalk

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3M makes a double sided foam tape in various widths that should work for this project. It is used by many automakers to install trim and other accessories to vehicles.I get mine online or at the local automotive paint store. There may be other sources as well.

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Which flares do you have? My fender flares actually screw into the inner fender wells. Then there are clips that snap onto the bottom of the rockers on both ends of each flare and than screw into them as well. Unless your talking something totally different then I've got, I don't think double sided tape alone would hold them flares at highway speeds.

Here's a shot of my Bushwhackers.

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JR

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I personally would not put them on if I lived in a rust belt area, Here in ND we are not in a heavily salted area although we are getting there with even worse stuff like Beat juice and liquid chloride deicing formulas and I still see way more fender rust with the use of flares of any type, once the moisture and salt and road debris does work in behind it just sits and eats, I saw this with a set I had on one of my rigs years ago, saw surface rust peaking through, removed the flares and cleaned up area and it did not progress, tried them on a second rig and same issue a couple years later, never looked at another set since.Couldn't imagine how bad it would be in a rust belt area.

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I live in the heart of the rust belt (high humidity and lots of salt) and in 3 yrs haven't had any problems yet. I take them off in the spring and fall and wash and wax behind them. The flares do great for keeping road debris and stone chips to a minimum.JR

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Well I can prove anyone wrong about the road debris, let me have it for a week and one would see they make no difference at all that way.For reference My daily driver sees at minimum 160 miles of country gravel roads weekly. I usually get to see what color my rigs are about 6 times a year depending on the moisture we get.I need to start taking pics of all the other rigs with big flares to show you how well they keep road debris off, they all look the same as mine "dirt colored".The only chips they keep from happening is the little lip around the wheel wells, most chips happen further back on the rocker panels and lower fender and most are on the front of the hood and windshield from passing other vehicles.

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Yea they are the same as yours diesel4life and screw on to the inner wheel well also but I looked the install instructions and they say that the rubber strip along the edge adheres to the side of the fender. But maybe this is an unnecessary step. Sent from my RM-820_nam_att_100 using Tapatalk

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Yea they are the same as yours diesel4life and screw on to the inner wheel well also but I looked the install instructions and they say that the rubber strip along the edge adheres to the side of the fender. But maybe this is an unnecessary step. Sent from my RM-820_nam_att_100 using Tapatalk

Are you talking about along the top of the fender flare? I bought mine new and there was never anything in the install instructions but they may have changed by now.... JR

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Diesel4life where did U get the Replacement bumper? Looks Sweet..

Thanks! I picked it up over the summer. Traded a guy a set of 30k mile tires straight up for it. I think I got the better end of the deal, lol JR

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Diesel4life yea that rubber strip along the top is wat im referring to. So the adhesive like u said must be a new addition. In that case I will skip that part and just screw them on. Thanks for the help!Sent from my RM-820_nam_att_100 using Tapatalk

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We see that every time you post!

JR

LOL....................I am an extreme realist, common sense life experiences rule in my life.

I am old school and live in an all natural rural world yet not covered by pavement or the "concrete jungle" scenario thankfully.

I don't mean anything or hope nobody ever takes me in a demeaning or personal manner, I just like to make my point plain and simple.

Without meeting me in person I know exactly how most would take my posts online.

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I think all opinions are helpful after that is probably why most of this joined and post on this site, to get a different perspective on things we do or want to do with our trucks. The one thing I noticed on my truck that the fender flares may or may not fix is when its wet I get tire spray all around my wheel well. At certain speeds it actually gets shot straight up. But I agree rocks and dirt the flares are probably not much of a remedy.Sent from my RM-820_nam_att_100 using Tapatalk

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When you have a couple of inches of mud and frozen snow hanging off of them, you will see what they do and don't protect. Its like a mudflap that encompasses the entire wheel well not just one strip of rubber hanging from the bottom. A set of mud flaps along with fender flares would probably be a best case scenario for protection. May look a little goofy tho. One thing about them is you do have to take them off and clean them at least anually IMO. I do it twice a year just to see what's going on in there and wax the paint.JR

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I'm right there with Wild & Free as well I spend a majority of time on dirt roads. The only paved road here is US95 everything else is dirt even in most towns are dirt city streets. Like now I've got those stick on rocker panels and now regretting putting them on. Because of exactly the reason Wild & Free mention that look cool and nice when clean but I can see where the mud is going to attack the body eventually. So I do everything I can to prevent mud and salt to stand on the body so I make sure to rinse the body down weekly if possible with water to remove any caked up mud and salts. I've consider pulling them off too but I know the huge mess it will be getting all that sticky goo off the rocker panels now.

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All of this is part of the reason I bed lined my rockers. I cleaned the paint up real good before I rolled the black stuff on obviously. I didn't just do the rockers, but around that little lip that goes over the wheel wells. I did the inner edge of the wheel wells as well. This way the metal has that much more protection and it wont let that crap get in and sit on the paint. My paint is really starting to chip away anyway because the guy that I bought this truck from had a VERY cheap paint job put on before I bought it. I figured I could save the rockers by bedlining them.

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WillYou are going to need to keep your rig washed up underneath as often as possible as you are right next to Minnesota which is a major rust belt area and GF and the whole eastern side of the state tend to use more salts like Mn.

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I wish this thread would have come across a month ago I would have taken pictures when I pulled my flares off to clean them. If installed properly they fit nice and tight to the body I have yet to pull any stones or mud out of them yet in 3 plus years. This with lots of dirt roads, oil well leases and running through the fields during harvest time on the families 1100 acre farm in New Lyme. When I bought the truck it had not been subjected to salt but had lots of chips from 13 years of use and abuse. No rust anywhere but if left untreated I literally would have no fenders or rockers by now. You either have to be proactive about rust protection around here or your vehicle will rot in front of your eyes. So I bought a gallon of chassis saver and monsta lined along the fender wells and bottom of the rockers as well as the bed rails. I added the flares because I didn't care for the looks of the bed liner along the fender wells.

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JR

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I wish this thread would have come across a month ago I would have taken pictures when I pulled my flares off to clean them. If installed properly they fit nice and tight to the body I have yet to pull any stones or mud out of them yet in 3 plus years. This with lots of dirt roads, oil well leases and running through the fields during harvest time on the families 1100 acre farm in New Lyme. When I bought the truck it had not been subjected to salt but had lots of chips from 13 years of use and abuse. No rust anywhere but if left untreated I literally would have no fenders or rockers by now. Either you gotta be very proactive around here with protection or your vehicle will literally rot in front of your eyes. So I bought a gallon of chassis saver and monsta lined along the fender wells and bottom of the rockers as well as the bed rails. I added the flares because I didn't care for the looks of the bed liner along the fender wells. JR

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Well at least we have metal to protect, at the mine I work at all we run are 2500 HD gasser chevys and they don't even have metal box fenders anymore, in the constant mud and off roading the rear box quarter fenders are torn of within weeks of showing up as they are all plastic, with every newer generation of pickup we get from chevy they are built more and more like cars than pickups..................junkier every year drivetrain wise and body wise as well.

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Well at least we have metal to protect, at the mine I work at all we run are 2500 HD gasser chevys and they don't even have metal box fenders anymore, in the constant mud and off roading the rear box quarter fenders are torn of within weeks of showing up as they are all plastic, with every newer generation of pickup we get from chevy they are built more and more like cars than pickups..................junkier every year drivetrain wise and body wise as well.

That reminds me of the time we had to go down into a mineshaft under lake erie to repair an elevator they used to bring equipment down into the salt mine. We got to the bottom and low and behold a CAT 988 sitting in the corner of the mine abandoned. It looked like it had been through a nuclear holocaust. Rims rotted to the point the tires were flat, hoses extremely dry rotted, cab looked like swiss cheese. It was sad to see such a magnificent piece of equipment left to rot like that. JR

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Sounds like any equipment that works at sugar beet sites, that beet juice eats iron faster than anything I have ever seen, loaders 5 years old are pretty much rusted out and wiring harnesses are corroded to junk like you couldn't believe.I laugh when they put the beet juice on roads and claim it is not corrosive when it is worse than salt and chloride.Just a comment: here in ND there are no under ground mines, all surface coal mines.

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I live in the heart of the rust belt (high humidity and lots of salt) and in 3 yrs haven't had any problems yet. I take them off in the spring and fall and wash and wax behind them. The flares do great for keeping road debris and stone chips to a minimum. JR

I was going to mention this, but thanks to diesel4life, it's done. Either living in the rust belt or not, it is highly recommended to strip, clean, wax and re-install twice per year. There is usually a very small build up of debris and such at minimum that will hold moisture and can rust the edge of the fender or discolor the paint.

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