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19.5 inch rims...


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Couple days ago,  we  posted  back and forth on  the  merits of  moving up to  the  19,5 inch  rims/tires.

I  just  talked to my neighbor,  who's   worked on these  from time to time.

He's  a little  concerned  that  the  bead area on these  tires  aren't  real   'ruff country'  friendly.  ie:  It doesn't take much of a  side-shot  to  push the tire off the  seal..  frozen ruts,   branches,  etc.

The  older rims  he's  worked with  really didn't have much of  a  lip,  it was more  like  a  taper, ending  in a  small little  raised  lip.     which  made it  really hard  to  'seat'  the tire..  and  when it's  time to  dismount,    shoot,  just let the air out and  it  was  broke down!

Definitely need  a   puff tank  to  get them  seated.

These  'new' rims  offered  by  vision,  and other  mfgs.   may  have   made improvements in this area???  

I also found  a  steel rim  mfg  on the east coast,  made in USA,  (of course more $$$ too)  but  before I  plunge into anything,  I'd like  your guys  thoughts! 

Thanks

 

 

 

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I know that Toyo recommends a higher pressure than I expected, can't recall off the top of my head, to keep the bead seated.... but I don't know if that is due to mfgr CYA or fact.

 

Of course I didn't get any good photos of the bead area.

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Well in all reality if one is going to 19.5 it is for load capacity and longevity while doing so in an OTR world, they are and were not intended as offroad units and this is why they require higher pressures as well. Of course this is just my internal commons sense talking not backed by any facts. :2cents:

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Well in all reality if one is going to 19.5 it is for load capacity and longevity while doing so in an OTR world, they are and were not intended as offroad units and this is why they require higher pressures as well. Of course this is just my internal commons sense talking not backed by any facts. :2cents:

Sure,  if  I was  going to be  a  trail runner/rock crawler,   I agree 100%!      I was  only worried about the occasional  deep frozen ruts..  (usually not a problem around  'here' gotta have MUD  to  make ruts!)  or  the  'hidden'   stump  that  lurks  in the grass. Or  the rare  curb rub.. :ashamed:

Oh hell,  any tire  could be a victim under the  wrong  circumstances! 

 

   I've seen  80 up to  120  psi  recommended..   maybe some of  my neighbors problems  were from not enough  pressure? :shrug:

anyhoo,   UPS  was here today,  and  I was  checkin out  his  tires!   He  wondered what the heck I was doing..  and  I told him!  HA..  Almost a 'modern' tire,  big ol  tall rim, and  short profile rubber...

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I am allowed to go as low as 70 by Toyo, found my notes,  but Les Schwab only put 50 in them to start. I will, personally, go as low as 50 in the winter and not worry about a bead. I am not sure I would go much lower than that thou. 50 psi is a lot of holding force.

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