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I finally got my oil analysis back. This is my first one ever so I don't know anything about the numbers on the report. Maybe you guys could help me out with whether these numbers are good bad or somewhere in between. The report says resample at regular interval. It was John Deere Plus 50 (15w40) changed at 10000 kilometers (6210 miles). I've tried posting the report but it didn't work so I'll just write it down here. viscosity------13.3fuel-----------0soot----------5oxidation-----13nitration------9water---------0antifreeze----0 silicone-------10iron-----------30chromium----1aluminum----8copper-------2lead----------2tin------------0nickel--------0silver---------0 molybdenum-129magnesium---25sodium--------15titanium-------0boron----------119potassium-----6calcium--------3083zinc------------1564barium--------0phosphorus---1447

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Ok the sample looks good. It would also be nice to know what the TBN # is?

Any way here is what each element will be from:

Iron (Fe) Cylinder Liners, Rings, Gears, Crankshaft, Camshaft, Rods, Valve Train, Oil Pump Gear, Wrist Pins Casting Iron

Chromium (CR) Rings, Liners, Exhaust Valves, Shaft Plating, Stainless Steel Alloy

Nickel (Ni) Alloy in Valves, Crankshaft, Camshaft, Contaminant in Marine Bunker Fuels

Aluminum (Al) Pistons, Thrust Bearings, Turbo Bearings, Main / Rod Bearings in Cat Engines

Copper (Cu) Main / Rod Bearings (also look for lead), Brass / Bronze Bushings (also look for Tin and / or Zinc), Oil Cooler Core Tubing

Lead (Pb) Overlay Metal in Main / Rod Bearings, sometimes, Solder, Aftermarket Additive

Tin (Sn) Bearings (Babbitt), also look for Lead, Antimony and Copper, Bronze Bushings Flashing from Pistons, Solder from Tin-Lead Solder

Silver (Ag) Silver in Wrist Pin Bushings in EMD 567 & 745 Engines, some Solder from Cooler Core Joints

Silicon (Si) Silica - Dirt, Silicone From Silicon Based Synthetic, Silicone Sealants, Silicates from Antifreeze

Viscosity measures a lubricant's resistance to flow (fluid thickness) at temperature and is considered an oil's most important physical property. Depending on lube grade, viscosity is tested at 40 and/or 100° Celsius.

Fuel Dilution is the amount of raw, unburned fuel that ends up in the crankcase. It lowers an oil’s viscosity and flash point creating friction-related wear almost immediately by reducing film strength.

Soot is also reported in % of volume and can indicate reduced combustion efficiency. Soot can be caused by over-fueling, air restrictions, blow-by, excessive engine brake use and/or excessive exhaust backpressure.

Oxidation measures the breakdown of a lubricant due to age and operating conditions. It prevents additives from performing properly, promotes the formation of acids and increases viscosity.

Nitration indicates excessive "blow-by" from cylinder walls and/or compression rings. It also indicates the presence of nitric acid, which speeds up oxidation. Too much disparity between oxidation and nitration can point to air to fuel ratio problems. As oxidation / nitration increases, so will total acid number and viscosity, while total base number will begin to decrease. Nitration is primarily a problem in natural gas engines.

Molybdenum is a multi-source metal detected with Elemental Analysis by ICP (inductively-coupled plasma), which detects up to 24 metals, measuring less than 5μ in size, that can be present in used oil due to wear, contamination or additives.

InReciprocating Engines

Alloy or Plating from Rings, Friction Modifier Additive in oils, Grease Contamination, Molybdates from some coolants

Manganese (Mn) Steel Alloy Metal in Gears, Some Shafts

Boron (B) Additive common in engine oil, some gear oils

Calcium (Ca) Detergent / Dispersant Additive, Calcium from water contamination, Lime Dust

Zinc (Zn) Alloy in Brass, Anti-Wear Additive ZDDP, Galvanized Steel from filter canisters

Phosphorous (P)Anti-Wear Additive ZDDP (ZincDialkyl- DithioPhosphate), Phosphate Ester, Phosphate Inhibitor found in Coolants

Magnesium (Mg)Detergent / Dispersant Additive, Alloy, Environmental Contaminant

Sodium (Na)Sodium Antifreeze Inhibitor (Coolant Leak), Additive in Unleaded Gasoline Engine Oils, Salt Water, Spray Wash

InReciprocating Engines

Alloy or Plating from Rings, Friction Modifier Additive in oils, Grease Contamination, Molybdates from some coolants

Manganese (Mn) Steel Alloy Metal in Gears, Some Shafts

Boron (B) Additive common in engine oil, some gear oils

Calcium (Ca) Detergent / Dispersant Additive, Calcium from water contamination, Lime Dust

Zinc (Zn) Alloy in Brass, Anti-Wear Additive ZDDP, Galvanized Steel from filter canisters

Phosphorous (P)Anti-Wear Additive ZDDP (ZincDialkyl- DithioPhosphate), Phosphate Ester, Phosphate Inhibitor found in Coolants

Magnesium (Mg)Detergent / Dispersant Additive, Alloy, Environmental Contaminant

Sodium (Na)Sodium Antifreeze Inhibitor (Coolant Leak), Additive in Unleaded Gasoline Engine Oils, Salt Water, Spray Wash

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i would like to see what it looks like on your dipstick or in a container. could you take a photo?

Sorry this was from back in February so all evidence is long gone. I can say this that it looked pretty black on the dipstick.

---------- Post added at 06:33 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:29 PM ----------

Ok the sample looks good. It would also be nice to know what the TBN # is?

What is the TBN #? Also I'm wondering if you could tell me if any of the numbers are approaching too high of a level or is everything still good and safe?

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Sorry this was from back in February so all evidence is long gone. I can say this that it looked pretty black on the dipstick.

---------- Post added at 06:33 PM ---------- Previous post was at 06:29 PM ----------

All your numbers seem to look fine for now. Also the color of the oil will not be indicitive of its usable life. Alanysis it the only true measure. TBN is the Total Base Number of the oil. It helps control the acid formation from combuston- blowby. With pre '07 trucks we tend to use an Oil with a higher TBN. For instince the oil I use starts out as a TBN of 12. Typicaly a premium synthetic oil will have a TBN around 10.

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