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1993 Pace Enclosed Trailer... recent aquisition


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I bought a well used Pace enclosed trailer from a friend who was getting out of re-encting...  I paid 600$.  It has about a 10 foot long box, but not real wide.  The fender width is barely wider than the truck...  maybe an inch on each side.  A single side swing door on the rear.   

 
During my adventures last summer, I had to tie tarps over my electric mobility scooter when traveling because I had only open trailers except for the huge toy hauler/camper... I know the scooter electronics are not waterproof. So I'm thinking an enclosed trailer is a step forward. Yes, this trailer turned out to be more of a fixer-upper than I expected... Surprise!  Seems that way with everything I buy.

I've been working with a heat gun to soften & remove the logos & decals from the previous owner's re-enacting group.  A small area at a time, I was able to get an edge with a plastic putty knife (WM) & peel.  Repeat as necessary.  Then wash an area with actone.  The sides appear to be factory painted aluminum...  the paint is chalky...  I think too much acetone would strip it bare.

 

It needed tires too. The (probably original) Goodyear Marathon ST205/75R15 tires that were on it had tread like new but the sidewalls had serious "dry rot" cracking...  Since I was burning fuel in the truck (to go to the front end shop 2 towns away) I took the trailer too.  The old tires made it home from Hartford, CT an hour away... after I noticed  how bad the dry rot was (I hadn't seen the off side well when I picked it up)  I was not going to push my luck.  I didn't specify a tire & the shop selected Commodore Trailer tires in the same size.  He did balance them (at a reduced rate $5) says it makes sure the tires & wheels are straight & round.  He says he's had good luck with these tires, even selling them to commercial customers who use their trailers hard.   They cost 75.50 ea + $1 for each stem + $2 ea disposal + $5 to balance...  So the total was $177 after tax (not counting the big bucks for the Cooper AT3s that went on the truck).  With a bill over a grand, he does treat me right.     

 

I've been busty installing lots of new tie down eyes along the floor...  the trailer already has tie "downs" in the middle of the wall but not what I needed...  so I can secure my Pride Wrangler outdoor scooter. Still have to tie down in an enclosed trailer.

 

I discovered the roof needs repairing which my wife & I think we can do with marine grade caulk & new stainless steel bolts. I'll keep you posted how this goes. I'll try to get a picture or 2 when I get a chance.  

 

I'm going to replace the oval tail lights with LEDs & add side marker LEDs (trailer's so old, only has side reflectors).   Per my usual, I'm going to add DOT tape to the rear &  a partial piece on each side.   

 

I bought new aluminum ramps at Harbor Freight...  http://www.harborfreight.com/1200-lb-capacity-convertible-aluminum-loading-ramp-94057.html  I searched quite hard & couldn't find ramps wide enough for my scooter without taking the halves apart but really 1200# capacity?  My wife (weighs much less than me or the scooter) walked up one & I had a lot of spring.  I'm going to position a block under the middle of the ramp when loading.   
 

Edited by flagmanruss
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I stopped working on it when I got the enclosed trailer.  I gave it to my son-in-law who appreciates the work I did on it & has the skills & tiime to finish it.  So my investment isn't lost & I still get visitation rights.  (He loaned me his Explorer for 2 weeks last summer so I could communte to an event.)  

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That sounds like you made the right decision. An enclosed trailer would be better for your ride, but an open one is more versatile. Since your son has it I am sure you can borrow it when you need to.

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  • 6 months later...

I still have an open "Landscapers" style trailer 16' deck...  my former hay trailer...  when I need an open trailer. 

 

SOoo..  back to the enclosed trailer.

I had spent a lot of time with a heat gun, softening the transfers for the previous owner's group...  & peeling them off with a plastic putty knife & fingers   I left some transfers which could equally apply to US.  Re-enactors value patina & the fading of the finish will not go away without a spray gun.  Besides, every one in OUR group will recognize the trailer...  maybe some will actually notice the improvements.  

 

I got wintered out of this project...  but I'm B-A-C-K. 

I had replaced the oval in gromet lights with LEDs.  The old cut outs & new parts were a bit of a dicey fit but I made it work.  The steel in this trailer is very hard, almost bullet proof.  I wanted a second set of oval rear lights but opted for surface mount LEDs above the originals.  I drilled for the wires and drill & tapped the bolt holes.   

 

Still none of the lights are (legally) side markers...  OK, this older trailer with it's side reflectors is exempt but I still think side markers are a good idea for a couple of reasons.  Most obivious is one can verify the lights are still connected while moving.  (The trailer plug came out of the road when I picked the trailer up.) 

 

I mounted small LED markers high on the trailer sides.  I removed an interior trim strip so I could scope out the steel side frames.  Well, don't you know, the frames were not the U channels I thought & I hit the darn frames.  My drill skidded some so the fight was on.  The SS selt tapping screws only work on the sheet metal sides where the framing isn't.  I ended up drilling & tapping the side frames for one SS machine screw on each of the marker lights. 

I also wanted a tell tail on the turn lights, so I mounted an additional red side marker under the first...  wired to the turn.  Again had trouble with hitting the frame so I'm annoyed they lights are not perfectly lined up. 

 

IMG_2561.jpg

 

IMG_2559.jpg

 

I did all solder splices & shrink tubing, wired everything off the original trailer tail light wiring which was in good shape after I elimated the fold over 3M splices...  at least they were inside & somewhat protected.  I had quite a bit of trouble doing my spices (bad hands) but I persevered.  In the end, I spliced extensions on all the wires so I could better work on them.  Should have done this in the first place. 

 

The lights work like a charm.  It's nice to be able to verify my light plug connection from the driver's seat, saving me precious steps when I'm having a bad day...  or more likely after pushing & overdoing.  If I didn't over do, I'd accomplish  nothing.    

 

We've spotted some odd assembly on the roof which needs recaulking...  to be continued...       

Edited by flagmanruss
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  • 2 weeks later...

Wife departed on a trip this morning, this trailer in tow.  I watched from the window as she checked the lights before launch.  I like the way the double tail lights look...  nice & bright with brakes.  I could verify the tell tale side lights when she checked the turn signals too.   Nit-Picky, I know, but pleased with the result.     

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  • 7 months later...

I found this older trailer to have a rugged steel frame underneath & in the walls...  but the skin is a mixed bag.  Coated aluminum on the sides with plated steel screws (some rusting) into the side frames, galvanized steel for the roof into the steel arches & some type of molded plastic for the curved front.  Interestingly, the top of the front is a molded piece...  locared under the front & top, not over (to shingle the water away).  The seams between these different materials were done with "camper caulk" putty type...  and screws run through both panels into strips of 3/4" plywood. 

Where the caulk was not leaking, I left it be.  But the top molded nose piece seam had been leaking where the water ran down the front, staining the interior plywood liner.  There was a 1" aluminum trip strip over this seam.  I removed the screws, drilled out the steel self tappers that broke & drilled for #10 SS through bolts, walkers & nylock nuts...  My wife used underwater grade "LifeCaulk" on the seam & with one of us on the inside & one outside we worked the pieces from the center to the outside.  Then we smoothed up extruded caulk with paint thinner.  I don't see any more leaking. 

The price seemed right on this trailer too.  It has not been the bargain I expected.  I think it'll be a good unit... 

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