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The sport of Anvil shooting


flagmanruss

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i saw an ad for this on the history or discovery channel the other day. looks pretty wild. not sure i am going to participate. but you never know. i saw a video of some folks in Mexico that get together and strap exploxives of some sort onto sledge hammers and slam them down detonating the explosives while they are holding on to them. these guys make anvil shooting somewhat tame. i wish i could find yall the video.

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As a farrier, which means that I use an anvil daily, I know all about "anvil shooting"!!!! Seen it done numerous times. I sure wish I had pictures, but I won't be able to describe so of the crazy stuff I've seen whilst doing this!!!!! Alcohol is a pre-requisite for this activity by the way!!!:duh::lmao::lmao2:

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We presently own 2 anvils... having owned horses, we know farriers very well... doing reenacting, we count blacksmiths among our friends... Nobody I know is blowing up anvils!I do like the first guy who has the right idea... run like hell!The first lesson of artillery is don't stand behind the piece!R

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We presently own 2 anvils... having owned horses, we know farriers very well... doing reenacting, we count blacksmiths among our friends... Nobody I know is blowing up anvils! I do like the first guy who has the right idea... run like hell! The first lesson of artillery is don't stand behind the piece! R

so you think sitting on the anvil might not be advisable?:shrug:
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There is 2 ways to play this game. The first is obvious.......see how high you can get the anvil to fly. The second is to get the anvil to land closest to the launch point!!!All you need are 2 anvils, one for the base and one for the flying, black power and some fuse. Silicon caulk is optional!!!

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Somewhere is his later years... my wife's horse's issues got the better of him. He was fine until you tried to ride him. It was litterally like sitting on a stick of dynamite with the fuse lit. You knew sooner or later he was going to blow!! & Blow he did. Sheila was a more experienced horsewoman than I ever was (horseman). She knew enough to get the heck off. Eventually we realized his infirmaties were too much to overcome & put him down, for safety sake. My horse was just HOT! Nick was bred as a quarter horse race horse, the year his sire came off the track. Nick proved to have the hot attitude but was more of a flash in the pan. If you kept him going slow to moderate he would work himself into a lather, jigging & jumping. If you let him out for 1/2 mile, he'd settle down to a pleasant lope. Unfortuneately there weren't always places (or the inclination) to let him out. One of Nick's endearing traits was he loved rendezvous camp, enjoyed being hobbled on a patch of grass and wasn't bothered much by gunfire. I shot 22LR - 58 round ball holding his reins & he didn't do more than bob his head. I had him eatting grass near a field piece & he was not troubled. He was never sick... until the last. We were packing for our annual 'vous trip... he needed his shots. I learned later that older horses sometimes have a bad reaction to getting all the shots at once, specifically the combo of rabbis & tetnus. He colliced. Despite the vet's best efforts, I lost him. Nick was 28 & I'd had him since he was 4.

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