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Mopar1973Man

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Everything posted by Mopar1973Man

  1. Rare but does happen to get above 20 PSI of fuel pressure and push the front seal out of the VP44 dumping fuel in the crankcase. Remember the return port on the VP44 is much much smaller than the supply hole. Return in on the left and supply is on the right.
  2. Just a steep slope on my truck is enough to lock the seat belt and piss me off. The later truck use a swinging weight system to lock the seat belt.
  3. From the videos I found they all show CCW from the front to advance.
  4. First the ECM has to boot up and sense that the starter was bumped. If the ECM is not booting the prime cycle will not happen. Because aftermarket direct connect pumps like FASS and AirDog DDRP draw more amps than what the ECM is design to withstand. Full FASS and Full AirDog pump are fine with a protection relay. The other ones like AirTex pump etc. They again draw more amps to create the volume. You need the light in the cab. Being you have no way to read error codes being there is no PCM to start the CCD network nor the cluster to bias the voltage for the bus. Cummins Insite tool might help too if you have one. The WTS light should come on every key on cycle for at least a bulb test. No light, No boot.
  5. I just got majorly ripped off. I needed a 17mm crowfoot to get 2 injection lines loose on a 92 Dodge. They always say shop local. $50 for a set of metric crows feet. If I would have waited and just gone down today I can get the entire set for mere $9 in Ontario OR. Yeah it might be Harbor Freight but $50 for crows feet is just sick and wrong. At the time I needed them so I ate the bill but now kicking my own tail for it. I gave up on expensive tools long ago. I use to make sure to buy quality Craftsman tools (Sears). Just no sense in it. Most of the time they argue about if it failed or was it abused or used improperly and failed.
  6. Lift pump should pulse during cranking. 50% duty cycle. The reason for this is to keep the VP44 from over advancing during startup. This why you don't want direct power to the FASS. Then you'll get hard starts hot later on. WTS light is the next thing I need to know if it's coming on. If not then the ECM is NOT booting up at all. The first instruction is to light the WTS light and fire the grid heaters if needed.
  7. Actually low on the bottom fine up top. About 26° to 27° is all stock engine will give. Even with the injectors, I'm running I get bucking above 27°. The bottom end can come up another degree but you have to look at how much low boost retards and load base retard will cut back.
  8. Might be to send the ECM in for repair. ECM should cycle on and off pulsing during cranking.
  9. Glad you figured it out. Now you might want to order the ISSPro USB programming cable. Then you can program your warning light and the gauge lighting, also how fast the needle reacts. I would post up more about this but the search function is now broke and I can't find the article or my forum post. EDIT: Finally found it using Google.
  10. Return the FASS back to the lift pump circuit excess fuel pressure cranking is not good. Then I've got to ask is the WAIT TO START light working does it come on? I know this is a Fummins swap but I want to know if the ECM is even booting up. If there is no WAIT TO START then the VP44 will not fire up nor will the ECM command to start.
  11. The other thing that plays a huge roll in death wobble is oversize tires and wheels. Shocks that are worn out. Tires that are out of balanced which is typical of oversized tires. Typically something is loose or worn out that allows the bouncing of the axle to continue I've seen this one time as I rode past a truck that hit a bridge seam and the axle was jumping off the ground in an orbital motion.
  12. Really good company. They took care of me for my burned up PCM. Costly for the full replacement when the core is worthless being my printed circuit board was burned through where the short happened. It was un-repairable. They stay in contact with you till the job is done.
  13. Wish I knew more about the difference between the early and late. The late system like my truck only have the seat belt switch in the latch. As for the early with the under the middle seat module, I've never even seen one yet. If there was a way to convert over to the latch light as the later series does that would be the best choice.
  14. What size tires are you running? What gear ratio do you have? What injectors do you have? How many miles on these injectors? My last trip down the interstate I84 at 82 MPH twisting 2,500 RPM I rolled 19.58 MPG. My runs back and forth to Ontario, OR I net typically 21 MPG.
  15. Hmmm.. Food for thought. With these +30 HP injectors, it's just a tad smokey. Idle seems a bit low as well. Just want to add a few degrees at most. I'll have to dig the internet and see what I can find. Actually, the timing to advance turns the pump upwards towards the block. Denny T fuel pin is a for sure of extra power they have some steep profiles. This pump still got all the smog caps on the adjustment screws. Untouched for 260k miles. Governor spring for 1st Gen. https://www.dieselautopower.com/bosch-3700rpm-governor-spring-for-ve-pump Fuel Pin Denny T... https://www.dieselautopower.com/denny-t-stage-1-fuel-pin-1989-1993-dodge-5-9l-12-valve-cummins
  16. Hey gang. I've got a 1992 Dodge here that I've just installed injectors into. DAPs (5 x 0.011) +30 HP 1st Gen injectors. Now knowing what I do of tunning I know this pump needs a bump in timing. @JAG1 gave me the wrench for doing the timing. Now I need to know which way advances the timing. I'm thinking it turn it down as you stand at the driver's fender. It taps out at a mere 75 MPH and that all it will do for speed the owner would like to see more out of this. I'm thinking the governor spring is shot and not pulling the fuel pin as much anymore. I know I could opt for the 366 governor spring but that is a PITA to install. I'm thinking of just turning up the fuel screw more to compensate for the shortcomings. He's an older gent doesn't need a race truck just wants good power.
  17. Send your core in and left Blue Top to build it and then have a spare ready for next time or sell it.
  18. Error codes will remain for 40 warm-up cycles after the last error was set. Trying to determine if the problem is fix by error code is only done by clearing the codes with OBDII code reader. Then go for a good 10 to 15 mile ride and then check again.
  19. Like my economy tune could be adapted to fit 100 HP. I'm not into building performance tunes. Being I drive close to 1,000 miles a week but I do have an awesome economy tune. Matter of fact even with my current setup and 245's tires running 82 MPH at 2,500 RPM I still netted 19.58 MPG for the nearly 100-mile trip. So, there is a lot more to it than just fuel stretch.
  20. Yes. Support tickets can be done in two ways. 1. Email to support@mopar1973man.com automagically converted from email to a forum post and back to email in reply. 2. Using the Support option on the webpage. Now, either way, the communication is done in the Admin backroom and only you vs the staff. Any Admin or BoD's can answer the support ticket. When you PM me its strictly one on one which I'm not really fond of. The Support Ticket system allows all staff to handle the request. If I'm missing in action then other staff can handle the request and no one is left hanging. The only problem if I charge a fee the payment is made first and then I would support the ticket. If your request is something myself or staff can't handle that means we would have to do a refund of funds.
  21. Never rebuilt a Borg Warner turbo. Holset use to have a download of PDF documents no longer on the Holset website. BorgWarner doesn't even acknowledge the turbo. Just the company profile.
  22. Time to update to inexpensive Android... But you'll have to change radio heads. If you keep the iDevice you'll just be high price replacement.
  23. P0118 - Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor 1 Circuit High Theory of Operation The Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT) is located near the thermostat housing and is used to measure the engine coolant temperature. The Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor receives 5-Volts and a sensor ground from the PCM. The PCM monitors the change in voltage to determine the coolant temperature. There are two parts to this fault code, a key on check and a rationality check. After an eight hour cold soak, at key on the readings for the Inlet Air Temperature, Intake Air Temperature and Engine Coolant Temperature Sensors are all compared. If the temperatures differ more than a calibrated amount, then the appropriate sensor fault code would be recorded. The key on monitor is disabled for ambient temperatures below 20°F. This monitor looks for all the sensors to be grouped on one temperature or, in the case that the monitor fails, two sensors grouped at one temperature and one outlier. In the case that all three sensor values are distributed over a range of temperatures this diagnostic will not run. A block heater is one possible cause of such a distribution. The PCM rationality check looks at the temperature reading from the sensor over time and ensures that it changes with engine running. If the sensor reading does not change over a calibrated time limit, the fault will be recorded. Both the key-on and rationality portions of this monitor require that the diagnostic fails in two consecutive drive cycles before the MIL lamp is lit. The ETC lamp will also be illuminated. During this time the PCM uses a default value for the Coolant Temperature Sensor. The PCM turns off the MIL lamp when the diagnostic runs and passes in four consecutive drive cycles. When Monitored and Set Conditions When Monitored: This diagnostic runs continuously when the following conditions are met: • With the ignition on. • Battery voltage greater than 10.4 Volts. Set Conditions: • The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) detects the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Signal circuit is above a calibrated threshold. Default Actions: • The MIL is illuminated. Possible Causes ECT SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE ECT SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO VOLTAGE SENSOR RETURN CIRCUIT OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE (ECT) SENSOR POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) Always perform the Pre-Diagnostic Troubleshooting procedure before proceeding. (Refer to 28 - DTCBased Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). Diagnostic Test 1. ACTIVE DTC 1. Turn the ignition on. 2. With the scan tool, record all Freeze frame data. 3. With the scan tool, erase DTCs. 4. Turn the ignition off for 75 seconds. 5. Turn the ignition on. 6. With the scan tool, read DTCs. Did the DTC reset? Yes • Go To 2 No • Perform the INTERMITTENT CONDITION diagnostic procedure. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). 2. CHECK THE (K2) ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO VOLTAGE 1. Ignition on. 2. Disconnect the Coolant Temperature Sensor harness connector. 3. Measure the voltage of the (K2) Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT) Signal circuit at the sensor harness connector. NOTE: The voltage should read approximately 5.0 Volts with connector disconnected and key on. Is the voltage above 5.1 Volts? Yes • Repair the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit for a short to voltage. • Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). No • Go To 3 3. CHECK THE ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR 1. Turn the ignition off. NOTE: Check connectors - Clean/repair as necessary. 2. Measure the resistance across the terminals of the ECT Sensor. Is the resistance between 300 and 90k Ohms? Yes • Go To 4 No • Replace the Coolant Temperature Sensor in accordance with the Service Information..(Refer to 07 - Cooling/Engine/SENSOR, Coolant Temperature/Removal) • Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). 4. CHECK THE (K2) ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE 1. Disconnect the PCM C1 harness connector. 2. Measure the resistance of the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit between the ECT Sensor harness connector and the PCM C1 harness connector. Is the resistance below 5.0 Ohms? Yes • Go To 5 No • Repair the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit for an open or high resistance. • Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). 5. CHECK THE (K914) SENSOR RETURN CIRCUIT FOR AN OPEN/HIGH RESISTANCE 1. 2. Measure the resistance of the (K914) ECT Sensor Return circuit between the ECT Sensor harness connector and the PCM C1 harness connector. Is the resistance below 5.0 Ohms? Yes • Go To 6 No • Repair the (K914) ECT Sensor Return circuit for an open or high resistance. • Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). 6. POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE 1. Disconnect all PCM harness connectors. 2. Disconnect all related in-line harness connections (if equipped). 3. Disconnect the related component harness connectors. 4. Inspect harness connectors, component connectors, and all male and female terminals for the following conditions: • Proper connector installation. • Damaged connector locks. • Corrosion. • Other signs of water intrusion. • Weather seal damage (if equipped). • Bent terminals. • Overheating due to a poor connection (terminal may be discolored due to excessive current draw). • Terminals that have been pushed back into the connector cavity. • Perform a terminal drag test on each connector terminal to verify proper terminal tension. Repair any conditions that are found. 5. Reconnect all PCM harness connectors. Be certain that all harness connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged. 6. Reconnect all in-line harness connectors (if equipped). Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged. 7. Reconnect all related component harness connectors. Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged. 8. With the scan tool, erase DTCs. 9. Using the recorded Freeze Frame and Environmental Data, along with the When Monitored and Set Conditions above, operate the vehicle in the conditions that set the DTC. 10. With the scan tool, read PCM DTCs. Did the DTC return? Yes • Replace the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) in accordance with the Service Information. (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8E - Electronic Control Modules/MODULE, Powertrain Control/Removal) . • Perform the PCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). No • Test complete. • Perform the PCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure)
  24. P0117 - Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Low Theory of Operation The Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT) is located near the thermostat housing and is used to measure the engine coolant temperature. The Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor receives 5-Volts and a sensor ground from the PCM. The PCM monitors the change in voltage to determine the coolant temperature. There are two parts to this fault code, a key on check and a rationality check. After an eight hour cold soak, at key on the readings for the Inlet Air Temperature, Intake Air Temperature and Engine Coolant Temperature Sensors are all compared. If the temperatures differ more than a calibrated amount, then the appropriate sensor fault code would be recorded. The key on monitor is disabled for ambient temperatures below 20°F. This monitor looks for all the sensors to be grouped on one temperature or, in the case that the monitor fails, two sensors grouped at one temperature and one outlier. In the case that all three sensor values are distributed over a range of temperatures this diagnostic will not run. A block heater is one possible cause of such a distribution. The PCM rationality check looks at the temperature reading from the sensor over time and ensures that it changes with engine running. If the sensor reading does not change over a calibrated time limit, the fault will be recorded. Both the key-on and rationality portions of this monitor require that the diagnostic fails in two consecutive drive cycles before the MIL lamp is lit. The ETC lamp will also be illuminated. During this time the PCM uses a default value for the Coolant Temperature Sensor. The PCM turns off the MIL lamp when the diagnostic runs and passes in four consecutive drive cycles. When Monitored and Set Conditions When Monitored: This diagnostic runs continuously when the following conditions are met: • With the ignition on. • Battery voltage greater than 10.4 Volts. Set Conditions: • The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) detects the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor Signal circuit is below a calibrated threshold. Default Actions: • The MIL is illuminated. Possible Causes ECT SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO GROUND ECT SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR RETURN CIRCUIT ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE (ECT) SENSOR POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE (PCM) Always perform the Pre-Diagnostic Troubleshooting procedure before proceeding. (Refer to 28 - DTCBased Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). Diagnostic Test 1. ACTIVE DTC 1. Turn the ignition on. 2. With the scan tool, record all Freeze frame data. 3. With the scan tool, erase DTCs. 4. Turn the ignition off for 75 seconds. 5. Turn the ignition on. 6. With the scan tool, read DTCs. Did the DTC reset? Yes • Go To 2 No • Perform the INTERMITTENT CONDITION diagnostic procedure. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). 2. CHECK THE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR 1. Turn the ignition off. 2. Disconnect the Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (ECT) harness connector. NOTE: Check connectors - Clean/repair as necessary. 3. Measure the resistance between ground and one of the terminals of the ECT Sensor. Is the resistance below 10k Ohms? Yes • Replace the Coolant Temperature Sensor in accordance with the Service Information..(Refer to 07 - Cooling/Engine/SENSOR, Coolant Temperature/Removal) • Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). No • Go To 3 3. CHECK THE (K2) ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT FOR A SHORT TO GROUND 1. Disconnect the PCM C1 harness connector. NOTE: Check connectors - Clean/repair as necessary. 2. Measure the resistance between ground and the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit at the ECT Sensor harness connector. Is the resistance below 10k Ohms? Yes • Repair the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit for a short to ground. • Perform the POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). No • Go To 4 4. CHECK FOR THE (K2) ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR SIGNAL CIRCUIT SHORTED TO THE (K914) ENGINE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR RETURN CIRCUIT 1. Measure the resistance between the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit and the (K914) Sensor Ground circuit at the Coolant Temperature Sensor harness connector. Is the resistance below 10k Ohms? Yes • Repair the short between the (K2) ECT Sensor Signal circuit and the (K914) Sensor Ground circuit. • Perform POWERTRAIN VERIFICATION TEST - 6.7L. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). No • Go To 5 5. POWERTRAIN CONTROL MODULE 1. Disconnect all PCM harness connectors. 2. Disconnect all related in-line harness connections (if equipped). 3. Disconnect the related component harness connectors. 4. Inspect harness connectors, component connectors, and all male and female terminals for the following conditions: • Proper connector installation. • Damaged connector locks. • Corrosion. • Other signs of water intrusion. • Weather seal damage (if equipped). • Bent terminals. • Overheating due to a poor connection (terminal may be discolored due to excessive current draw). • Terminals that have been pushed back into the connector cavity. • Perform a terminal drag test on each connector terminal to verify proper terminal tension. Repair any conditions that are found. 5. Reconnect all PCM harness connectors. Be certain that all harness connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged. 6. Reconnect all in-line harness connectors (if equipped). Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged. 7. Reconnect all related component harness connectors. Be certain that all connectors are fully seated and the connector locks are fully engaged. 8. With the scan tool, erase DTCs. 9. Using the recorded Freeze Frame and Environmental Data, along with the When Monitored and Set Conditions above, operate the vehicle in the conditions that set the DTC. 10. With the scan tool, read PCM DTCs. Did the DTC return? Yes • Replace the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) in accordance with the Service Information. (Refer to 08 - Electrical/8E - Electronic Control Modules/MODULE, Powertrain Control/Removal) . • Perform the PCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure). No • Test complete. • Perform the PCM VERIFICATION TEST. (Refer to 28 - DTC-Based Diagnostics/MODULE, Powertrain Control (PCM) - Standard Procedure).
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