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Scan Gauge II Question


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For anyone who has a SCII - is there a battery in there that holds the memory of it for when the truck batteries are disconnected? The last two times I've had to start over with the fuel level calculation as when I disconnected the batteries for a battery swap, and then for my alternator, I lost my settings in the SCII. As my fuel gauge is currently inop I kind of rely on it a bit for my fuel level, and getting it calibrated takes several tanks of fuel, which for me translates to about 6 weeks, as I don't have far to drive for my job. Thanks.

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Mine holds the calibration in it's memory, it sounds like yours is not. Did you know that if you go to "fillup" right after "fillup" you can adjust the percentage of error and be recalibrate right then? Just make a note of what your calibration is.

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Mine holds the calibration in it's memory, it sounds like yours is not. Did you know that if you go to "fillup" right after "fillup" you can adjust the percentage of error and be recalibrate right then? Just make a note of what your calibration is.

There must be some type of bios type battery in that thing to hold the non-volatile memory (I think that's the right high dollar word). I sent a message to Scan Gauge asking the same thing, we'll see what they say.) I've looked, though, and cannot find it. Not sure what you mean by that. I'm guessing that you mean note the % of calibration, and go right to that calibration if I lose the memory? Is that correct? When I fill up, I always go to the more then fill up and adjust as necessary. Right now it's spot on, and I don't want to lose it in a couple weeks when I install my fuel boss and disconnect my batteries. I can't get a new fuel level sender now as already tapped out for the month, and plus, not sure if it's my sender. My fuel level gauge has been a source of angst since I brought her home in 1999. Many warranty calls and never worked right. Warranty ran out, and I gave up. It works when it wants to and when it doesn't it will freeze in place at full. Thanks for the reply. You still flying those apache's? I retired from the H60s at the end of 2008.
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Like a memory card in a camera I don't believe a batter is required to hold the NVM.

Yes, note the calibration and just go directly to it and you should be good.

Yes I am still flying 64's, its a fun job!

I'm flying Bell 407s for the hospital here in Flagstaff. Definitely not the same. I miss power and 2 engines! Especially in the summer here at 7500'.

- - - Updated - - -

Here's the answer to my question from Scan Gauge, and why I've been losing my calibration:

The ScanGauge does not have an internal battery. It uses the vehicles battery for power. If you disconnect the ScanGaugeII before disconnecting the vehicle's battery it will not reset the ScanGaugeII.

Regards,

Cristina Bollinger

Repairs and Technical Support

Linear Logic

1.888.433.5664

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You could always go to the menu and reset everything back to default values, then reenter everything and start fresh. That's what I'd been doing until yesterday. The last time I reset it all was few weeks ago when I changed out my starter. It's take several tank fill ups but it's dialed in pretty good now, within .3 gallons of actual fill up needs.

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My speed / odometer on ScanGauge II is right on the money. Then the GPH or gallons used is typically +/- 0.2 at the most. So the data on the SGII is more accurate than my hand math is. As for storing data its stored in non-volatile RAM just like a thumb drive so when its unplugged or powered off the data is stored. Same thing is true for error codes in the PCM & ECM also stored in non-volatile RAM. This why when you disconnect the batteries the error codes still exist.

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