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Is This Wood Worth Any Money?


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ahem, it WAS worth a lot more as a saw log!!! :duh: LOL< as a firewood, I burned some a few years ago. but it takes FOREVER to season. Walnut has a high oil content, and it really slows down the drying time. Get it split and stacked, when the bark falls off, wait another year! THEN it'll take all the air your furnace can give it to burn... But the end result will give you 'near nuclear meltdown' type heat. So, to answer your question; I'd say if it's ready to burn, it should be as valuable as any of the hardwood fuels

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looks like they are cut just short enough to be unusable for full stock gunstocks, would be good for people doing pistols and halfstocks though. I know a guy in Idaho that might give you something for them, getting them there is another matter though.

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was this the whole tree or just a limb they cut off? years ago, they came and chopped down a tree I purposely planted under the line leading to the house. I told them I was going to build a new house right beside my old place, and the line would be re routed long before that tree would be an issue. I got 1200 bucks compensation! (not bad for a 3 inch sapling!)... They apparently have insurance for these kind of issues.. But, in the end, they got almost all of it back when I did have them move the line anyways!

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It was two trees. One was pretty big, (the biggest ones in my picture were from that trunk) but they had to leave about 6' of it standing, because it was also a gate post. The other one was pretty small - about 8" around.

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Walnut is EXCELLENT firewood!! That said.............in order to burn properly in a modern wood burning stove, walnut needs to be CSS "cut, split, stacked" for at least 2 years because it's so "dense"!!! Otherwise, you're boiling water before you're burning wood.Michael may disagree, but he burns essentially all "soft-wood"!!Walnut, oak, mulberry, osage et.al., require 2-3 year of drying/seasoning time. Hardwood species like...........ash, box elder, soft maple, birch, and poplar will season in 6-8 months if CSS'd in a sunny and windy area.:smart::thumbup2:

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  • 1 month later...

as a previous poster pointed out, BW is spendy if it is in long lenghts. Here in MN it runs about $8 a boardfoot. I build furniture for play/toy/truck money and unless it's "rustic", it's not good for furniture (too short). If there is some good grain patterns people will pay good money for a gun stock, but that pile would make a LOT of gun stocks. Sadly, it looks like most of it will be firewood. It burns with a nice sweet odor (to me at least).

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Thanks for bumping this back up. :lol:Lets just say somebody wanted to make some gun stocks, or small clocks, or odds and ends. What should I ask for it? I'm gonna throw it on CL, and just see? I need a starting price though... I've been cutting hickory and white oak into firewood for the past couple days; I might just have to throw it in the pile when I sell the firewood... Hope not. :pray:

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can you tell if there is any tiger striping, or any other grain enhancments? Plain straight up BW in 2' logs you could start at $100 a chunk and negotiate from there I'd say. If you got s special grain going...it goes higher. All depends on what they'd want to use the wood for. Gun stock, turn some bowls ets.

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can you tell if there is any tiger striping, or any other grain enhancments? Plain straight up BW in 2' logs you could start at $100 a chunk and negotiate from there I'd say. If you got s special grain going...it goes higher. All depends on what they'd want to use the wood for. Gun stock, turn some bowls ets.

There's nothing special about the wood, other than it's black walnut, at least that I can tell, there's nothing special about it. I was thinking about asking $100 for a couple of the better chunks of wood. Always better to start high and negotiate, but then again, you don't want to scare off the customer with a crazy price. :smart:
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