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joecool911

Brake bleeder system?

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I am going to change my rotors, pads and calipers. You guys have any experience with those pump up brake bleeder systems? One person tool, plus I can flush the lines out with it. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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The only thing I have used besides the two person method is those one way fittings I installed on my harley. They actually work really well. Just loosen a half turn and start pumping. What ever you do always remember to start right rear, left rear, right front, and finish at left front.

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Yes I use to own one but 86 it when the pump went out. It works like a garden sprayer. Take the pump out, put brake fluid in the tank to the fill line, put pump back in, pump up the pressure, instal cap with quick disconnect fitting on brake fluid reservoir, attach hose from fluid tank, open bleed valve, open bleeder. Do not over pressurizer. I now use a vacuum bleeder that attaches at each bleed valve and use suction and dot4 fluid with a boiling point of 500f degrees. I can also use the vacuum pump to suck out other fluids, or test air and vacuum solenoids.

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Yes I use to own one but 86 it when the pump went out. It works like a garden sprayer. Take the pump out, put brake fluid in the tank to the fill line, put pump back in, pump up the pressure, instal cap with quick disconnect fitting on brake fluid reservoir, attach hose from fluid tank, open bleed valve, open bleeder. Do not over pressurizer. I now use a vacuum bleeder that attaches at each bleed valve and use suction and dot4 fluid with a boiling point of 500f degrees. I can also use the vacuum pump to suck out other fluids, or test air and vacuum solenoids.

A friend has a motive power brake bleeder and I really like it. Hooks into the master cylinder and pushes fluid out the lines...I spent good money on a vacuum bleeder and have not been impressed. It works but takes a lot of pumping. The Motive power bleeder can be had with just about every adapter you could ever need for around 100 bucks. Can also be used to do power steering flushes.

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The Motive power bleeder can be had with just about every adapter you could ever need for around 100 bucks. Can also be used to do power steering flushes.

Thanks for the info, sounds like a good price.

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Yeah but either you need an assistant or your doing a lot of running back and forth...I've borrowed my friends power bleeder a handful of times and will have a hard time going back now that I've used one. Between the 4 vehicles I own, atv's/dirt bikes, and the occasional side job I do it's definitely on the wish list.

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Yeah but either you need an assistant or your doing a lot of running back and forth...I've borrowed my friends power bleeder a handful of times and will have a hard time going back now that I've used one. Between the 4 vehicles I own, atv's/dirt bikes, and the occasional side job I do it's definitely on the wish list.

 

No assistant... Crack the bleed screw open. Hook up the tube. Jump in the driver seat start slowly pumping the brakes. The tubing is long enough and also the fluid in the jar prevents sucking air back into the system so you can typically pump about 5 times a wheel to clear air. I find way of doing things by myself...

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I stay away from the pumping the break method. I've seen several brake master cylenders go bad. If you are doing a vehicle that hasn't had a brake fluid flush in a long time the brake master cylender bore can have rust and pitting in the area where the seals on the rod never go in normale braking. When you push the brake peddle all the way to the floor, those seals get into that bad area and can get torn. When I have to do it that way, I only go down half way. 

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No assistant... Crack the bleed screw open. Hook up the tube. Jump in the driver seat start slowly pumping the brakes. The tubing is long enough and also the fluid in the jar prevents sucking air back into the system so you can typically pump about 5 times a wheel to clear air. I find way of doing things by myself...

Yep, either you need an assistant or your running back and forth a bunch...I have done it the way you describe in the past and more recently started using a vaccum pump which works but is pretty slow. I think anyone who tries a power bleeder once will be hooked, but maybe that's just me.

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:shrug:  I grab a video next time I do it... Just got done doing a buddies Kia by myself bleeding the system out and flushing the lines. No running back and forth just crack, hook, pump, close, fill and done.

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And in and out of the truck numerous times pumping the pedal throughout the course of four wheels.With a power bleeder you hook it up to the master, fill the resevoir, pressure it up and proceed to each wheel. You can do a complete flush at all four corners in a matter of minutes. No it isn't the only way to do it, but you won't find a quicker, simpler, or easier way to do a flush or bleed.

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Anyone use the gravity bleed method? Crack open the bleeder screw for like 20 mins and use the jar method. He says if you work on the front that you do not need to bleed the back because of the isolator valve will keep air from getting to the rear brakes.

Edited by joecool911

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Anyone use the gravity bleed method? Crack open the bleeder screw for like 20 mins and use the jar method. He says if you work on the front that you do not need to bleed the back because of the isolator valve will keep air from getting to the rear brakes.

 If you work on the passenger side rear, you have to go from there and work your way up to front driver side. If you did passenger front, then you do that and then driver front. The furthest is passenger rear, and closest is driver front.

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Thats the system my friend has. that will work if you only have Chryslers, Motive also offers a kit for most all import and domestic cars for around 100 bucks. It's cheaper to do it all in on shot vs piecing the system together, IIRC the different adapters are close to 30 bucks each.

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