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Lone Watie

Fuel Boss

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Lone Watie    1
Lone Watie

What are your takes on the fuel boss mech. pump from Glacier? Not too much info on them over at CF or DTR, and what is there is positive.

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gassernomore    12
gassernomore

If I am not mistaken, you still need your regular lift pump for start up and then I believe you turn it off and let the mechanical pump go with it. I thought there was a thread on the mechanical pumps, but I can't find it.

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edcasey    0
edcasey

There was an earlier thread on it here:http://forum.mopar1973man.com/showthread.php/801-mechanical-fuel-pump I helped put one on my cousin's truck. Easy to install and the quality is excellent. I really freaks you out when you step on the accelerator and the fuel pressure goes up instead of down. You do need an electric pump to help start the truck. It only runs for a couple of seconds and than automatically shuts off when the fuel pressure goes up. It also will come on if you ever have a problem with the Fuel Boss. So basically you have two fuel systems which could keep you from getting stranded if one fails. Add a PF7977 to your fuel canister and you have an excellent fuel system. Also, Richard at Glacier is an awesome guy to deal with. Very easy to get a hold of and knows his stuff.

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Lone Watie    1
Lone Watie

Thanks for the info, and thanks for the reference for Glacier. I'm curious why more of us not running this pump, is it a performance thing, i.e. doesn't blend well with chips and smartys and higher hp injectors. Just curious. Thanks again, going to read the thread now.

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Hood Latch    0
Hood Latch

There was an earlier thread on it here:http://forum.mopar1973man.com/showthread.php/801-mechanical-fuel-pump I helped put one on my cousin's truck. Easy to install and the quality is excellent. I really freaks you out when you step on the accelerator and the fuel pressure goes up instead of down. You do need an electric pump to help start the truck. It only runs for a couple of seconds and than automatically shuts off when the fuel pressure goes up. It also will come on if you ever have a problem with the Fuel Boss. So basically you have two fuel systems which could keep you from getting stranded if one fails. Add a PF7977 to your fuel canister and you have an excellent fuel system. Also, Richard at Glacier is an awesome guy to deal with. Very easy to get a hold of and knows his stuff.

Just curious: What kind of p.s.i. do you have @ idle, and @ say 1900 rpm's ? Are you pre-filtering this pump? As some of you know, I am experimenting with a FASS DDRP in the o.e.m. location on the block. If it does not work out for me and I decide to go another way, I am just about certain that I will install a FASS "pusher pump" down on the frame by the tank. Don't think I would want to keep pulling the fuel from an even further distance than I am now. Was the FUEL BOSS specifically designed to "pull instead of push" fuel?

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edcasey    0
edcasey

Thanks for the info, and thanks for the reference for Glacier. I'm curious why more of us not running this pump, is it a performance thing, i.e. doesn't blend well with chips and smartys and higher hp injectors. Just curious. Thanks again, going to read the thread now.

One of the reasons it hasn't done as well as the high end electric pumps is the warranty isn't nearly as good. Two years on the pump and one year on everything else. It's a real shame because these pumps are known for their longevity and reliability. If they had at least a 5 year warranty, they would sell much better. Another factor was pricing. Not long ago a Fuel Boss was about $700.00 while the AirDog was about $500.00. The Fuel Boss price has dropped to $579.00 and the new AirDog II is $599.00 so the Fuel Boss is now competitively priced. Opie's MITUSA (made in the USA) pump system is priced around $500.00. Another reason mechanical systems haven't been as popular was the AirDog's and Fass systems came with extra filtration. We now know that putting a Baldwin PF7977 in the stock fuel canister gives you equal contaminate filtration and better water separation then the AirDog so filtration isn't an issue. A final issue, that I can think of, is some people are afraid of breaking the belt that drives the pump. These are strong belts who's only job is to drive a low pressure fuel pump unlike the serpentine belt that has to drive the water pump, alternator, power steering pump, and air conditioner compressor. Opie recommends replacing the belt every 75,000 miles but many people will go twice that long. I know one guy who has over 200,000 miles on the original belt. Even if it does break, swapping belts is a 5 minute job. These mechanical systems have become so popular that when we tried to buy one of Opie's systems last year he wasn't taking orders because he was behind on production. I don't know if he is taking new orders yet.

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edcasey    0
edcasey

Just curious: What kind of p.s.i. do you have @ idle, and @ say 1900 rpm's ? Are you pre-filtering this pump? As some of you know, I am experimenting with a FASS DDRP in the o.e.m. location on the block. If it does not work out for me and I decide to go another way, I am just about certain that I will install a FASS "pusher pump" down on the frame by the tank. Don't think I would want to keep pulling the fuel from an even further distance than I am now. Was the FUEL BOSS specifically designed to "pull instead of push" fuel?

Mechanical fuel pump systems use a bypass valve to regulate pressure. The valve has shims inside of it that can be removed or added to adjust pressure. It only takes a minute to change shims and once you have the fuel pressure where you want it you don't need to touch it again. I have the same bypass valve on my fuel system. It works perfectly. So you adjust the shims to set the idle pressure where you want it. I know a guy who has it shimmed at 10 psi at idle and he says it goes to 16 psi at higher rpm's. My cousin's is about 12 psi at idle and I've seen it hit 21 psi. Yes. Like all engine mounted mechanical pumps, it is a suction pump. Unlike electric pumps that work much better as pusher pumps. The distance from the fuel tank is not an issue.

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Hood Latch    0
Hood Latch

Mechanical fuel pump systems use a bypass valve to regulate pressure. The valve has shims inside of it that can be removed or added to adjust pressure. It only takes a minute to change shims and once you have the fuel pressure where you want it you don't need to touch it again. I have the same bypass valve on my fuel system. It works perfectly. So you adjust the shims to set the idle pressure where you want it. I know a guy who has it shimmed at 10 psi at idle and he says it goes to 16 psi at higher rpm's. My cousin's is about 12 psi at idle and I've seen it hit 21 psi. Yes. Like all engine mounted mechanical pumps, it is a suction pump. Unlike electric pumps that work much better as pusher pumps. The distance from the fuel tank is not an issue.

Yep , understood. Same principle as an engine crankcase oil pump. Check valve, tolorences, and spring tension determines p.s.i., with some increased variable @ a higher r.p.m. I had never seen the Fuel Boss before, and was not familiar with the product. Thank you for the info. It sounds as if it is a well made pump. And, I can see why someone could view this pump as the heart of a "BELT AND SUSPENDERS" type approach to a solid fuel delivery system. You start your truck with maybe a FASS DDRP in the stock o.e.m. location, and then when it's running, switch it off. If the mechanical pump failed for some reason, the electric pump is only a toggle switch away. Kind of on the expensive side (having both pumps) I guess. But, I can also see the potential advantages of a system like this.

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edcasey    0
edcasey

Yep , understood. Same principle as an engine crankcase oil pump. Check valve, tolorences, and spring tension determines p.s.i., with some increased variable @ a higher r.p.m. I had never seen the Fuel Boss before, and was not familiar with the product. Thank you for the info. It sounds as if it is a well made pump. And, I can see why someone could view this pump as the heart of a "BELT AND SUSPENDERS" type approach to a solid fuel delivery system. You start your truck with maybe a FASS DDRP in the stock o.e.m. location, and then when it's running, switch it off. If the mechanical pump failed for some reason, the electric pump is only a toggle switch away. Kind of on the expensive side (having both pumps) I guess. But, I can also see the potential advantages of a system like this.

I didn't explain that very well. The Fuel Boss comes with a Hobbs switch. Once the mechanical pump comes up to pressure, the Hobbs switch shuts off the electric pump. No need for a manual switch. If for some reason the Fuel Boss quits working, the Hobbs switch automatically engages the electric pump. You wouldn't even know the change over has been made so an LED is included to mount on your dash. The LED comes on when the electric pump is running. Here's the installation manual. http://www.glacierdieselpower.com/images/PDFs/98.5-02-Fuel-Boss-Install-Manual.pdf

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Hood Latch    0
Hood Latch

I didn't explain that very well. The Fuel Boss comes with a Hobbs switch. Once the mechanical pump comes up to pressure, the Hobbs switch shuts off the electric pump. No need for a manual switch. If for some reason the Fuel Boss quits working, the Hobbs switch automatically engages the electric pump. You wouldn't even know the change over has been made so an LED is included to mount on your dash. The LED comes on when the electric pump is running. Here's the installation manual. http://www.glacierdieselpower.com/images/PDFs/98.5-02-Fuel-Boss-Install-Manual.pdf

Well now, this Fuel Boss sound's even better the more I learn about it !! Ol' Hood Latch has always liked to learn things of a worthwhile nature. Thank's very much for the head's up on the Glacier Diesel Power site, checking it out now.

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dobienut    11
dobienut

What are your takes on the fuel boss mech. pump from Glacier? Not too much info on them over at CF or DTR, and what is there is positive.

I've been running one of these pumps for over 2 years now and I wil say it's the best $600 I have spent on my truck. I went through 4 stock pumps before I found a website talking about them, so i researched it a bit, talked to Richard at Glacier and me and a buddy of mine both bought one. I maintain 16 psi@ idle and goes to 18 psi when driving. Stock pump may be on for a second or so when starting until the fuel boss kicks on, sometimes i wonder if I should have something geared up to run the factory pump once in a while just to keep it from seizing :lol:. I have broken one belt and that was my own fault, i backed through a hard snow bank about 3 ft deep and the snow packed up in around the pulley for the pump and must've twisted and pushed the belt off and it broke. I ordered a couple new ones and keep a spare under the back seat , but it's been there for over a year now. I can never say a bad thing about Richard @ Glacier, always top notch, always very willing to get the answers you need if there's a problem. I had a pressure issue when I installed, one phone call he told me where to go look and I fixed it no problem.(dirt in bypass valve from cutting the rubber hoses). Me personally, I don;t think anyone could go wrong buying one of these, but that's my opinion, others may not agree. :2cents:

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uber racing    0
uber racing

We've used "Gusher" style or "Garbage" types of pumps forever in industry on various types of equipment. They will take pretty much anything you throw at them. I would also venture to say that today's Gilmer belts are probably more reliable that most of the electric motors used on our fuel pumps. This type of fuel pump would be tough to beat.

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