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Valvoline marine 2 stroke

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Hi all, 1st time poster but been viewing for a while. Good site Mopar :thumbsup . I've got 3 qts of this Valvoline Marine dino left over from the summer (for the boat) and I was thinking of burning it up in the 6.0. It has pretty decent looking specs. for a dino and the description of its mixability sounds good too. What the heck right? Gotta use it in something. http://www.valvoline.com/products/Outbo ... MMA%20(BIA)%20Certified%202-Cycle%20Engine%20Oil.pdf Anyways what do you all think. snoboy

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By 6.0h, I'm guessing you have a Ford. I'd say; that as long as you don't have a DPF in the exhaust, go for it. Let us know how she runs.........if she runs, being a Ford and all!!!! >:) >:) LOL

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Sorry you had such a problem with the link... Is this the product you were talking about????? http://www.valvoline.com/pages/products ... product=61 :thumbsup M's Maiden
Yes ma'am! Thank you. I went one step further and opened the "product info" and tried to cut and paste the PDF file but it didn't want to work. Anyways just use moparmaiden's link and then use the "product info" to see the goods on the oil. snoboy

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Here you go a straight link now... http://www.valvoline.com/products/Outboard%20NMMA%20(BIA)%20Certified%202-Cycle%20Engine%20Oil.pdf Specs... Pour Point -40*C (-40*F) Flash piont 65*C (149*F) This is really good characteristic for 2 cycle oil really close to the value of diesel fuel so its not going to change the diesel fuel values much... But the pour point will help the diesel pour point go low into the winter temps... Here is a TDS sheet on some common #2 diesel fuel. http://www.cenexenergy.com/Downloads/2ULSDSpec_2006.pdf

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Specs...Pour Point -40*C (-40*F)Flash piont 65*C (149*F)This is really good characteristic for 2 cycle oil really close to the value of diesel fuel so its not going to change the diesel fuel values much... But the pour point will help the diesel pour point go low into the winter temps...That's exactly how I was looking at it. A couple of the Amsoil 2 stroke oils (Saber line) made for premix flash at well over 200 deg.F whereas the Interceptor (the stuff I use in my sleds) is lower but still at 183 deg.F. I was just thinking this Valvoline Marine which is ashless should be a pretty good candidate for a diesel mix AND Valvoline is the oil of choice for the Cummins engine :D . Anyways I'll use my Ford as a lab rat and let you guys know how it does. If my 6.0 can use it without clogging up my crappy VGT or EGR valve. then it should work great in a real diesel engine.snoboy

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So why do you want to add the two stroke oil? If it is for lubricity, I think you are wasting your time and money. If it is for making your truck run better, then it is not such a waste. Far as lubricity, think about all the big trucks using it and you know that they are not adding anything to the fuel. The refineries do have a lube additive that is mixed in.Tom

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So why do you want to add the two stroke oil? If it is for lubricity, I think you are wasting your time and money. If it is for making your truck run better, then it is not such a waste. Far as lubricity, think about all the big trucks using it and you know that they are not adding anything to the fuel. The refineries do have a lube additive that is mixed in. Tom

Oh well if I can't waste my money then why am I working. :poke snoboy

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Oh well if I can't waste my money then why am I working. :poke snoboy

Well, if you really NEED rid yourself of some money, just send it to me. I will 'properly' dispose of it! B)

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MnTom doesn't need to run it because Minnesooooooooota has a 2% (I believe) bio mandate on diesel fuel sold for over the road vehicles. Wonder how that's gonna work out over the winter??!!!

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Probably the same as last winter! Yep, we are required by law to use a minimum 2% Bio. Far as I know there weren't to many that had problems, but all that I know also run a decent anti-gel too.

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It's 2% mandated here in Mn. I heard the governor talking here a while back about making 20% mandatory in 2009. The station where I buy my fuel is the cheapest place for me to buy fuel and it is 5% bio.Also today this station started their winter mix. 50/50 diesel.

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It's 2% mandated here in Mn. I heard the governor talking here a while back about making 20% mandatory in 2009. The station where I buy my fuel is the cheapest place for me to buy fuel and it is 5% bio. Also today this station started their winter mix. 50/50 diesel.

50/50?? is that a common wintermix.???? That is also a huge jump from 5% to 20%..... `:(

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Your right that is very strong. I checked with the transport driver and he said it was 20% #1 fuel. I must have been thinking about anti-freeze. I also asked the driver why 5% bio-diesel when 2% is the mandate. He said that Murphy gets a bigger tax break the more bio-diesel they put in. I don't know for sure but bio-diesel in Mn must be state subsidized like ethenol. Anybody know for sure?

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High percentage of the hiway tractors use additives, that is why they are stacked around the fuel desk. I am aquainted with a couple that are using 2cycle now, one keeps good records and is running 400:1 - 81 less gallons this year 720 more miles run, 4 days longer, opened the 8th gallon of 2cycle, using 2cycle is $175 less money spent, if i remember correctly, on the pickle harvest. The other has trouble getting all the fuel rects, let alone the number of days out. Both are Detroit 60's, with electronic common rail injection.Theory is that the heavy part of the 2 cycle serves as upper cyl lube before washing down into the oil, the same heavy molecules are like marbles in a bag of BB's to take the pressure in the rotor to pump head, plunger to sleeve and under the pinlel in the injector. I am not sure why the sharp high pitched pre combustion noise quit but mine no longer sounds like the fuel is contaminated with gas, sounds like the old hi sulphur fuel.keydl

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Here you go a straight link now... http://www.valvoline.com/products/Outboard%20NMMA%20(BIA)%20Certified%202-Cycle%20Engine%20Oil.pdf Specs... Pour Point -40*C (-40*F) Flash piont 65*C (149*F) This is really good characteristic for 2 cycle oil really close to the value of diesel fuel so its not going to change the diesel fuel values much... But the pour point will help the diesel pour point go low into the winter temps... Here is a TDS sheet on some common #2 diesel fuel. http://www.cenexenergy.com/Downloads/2ULSDSpec_2006.pdf

I been using the valvoline 2 stroke for about a year with no problems at all.

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If the fuel is pumped through a pipeline, the current plan is to have the tank wagon driver add the lubricity material to the wagon load, brand specific.At 200:1 2cycle meets the lubricity minimum, how much further will an engine rum with a better lubricity spec?My engine was designed for a 350 HRRF spec and the gov mandated spec is 520, so the correct fuel is no longer available but the current fuel serves when mixed with 2cycle. I suspect that IP and injector service would be needed at intervals of less than 100k instead of over 500kI suspect that the 2cycle also lubes the compression ring exactly the same way that it does on a gas 2cycle engine and so, much less wear. The 500k engine runs 800k until a valve head falls off from fatigue and the engine is still a good core.My personal best for long lived is 411k on a car that I gave to a high school student that piled up miles faster than I did, I think he probably got another 40k before he failed to add oil every week.If someone else wants to run 2cycle I am interested in the results, I suspect improvement down to 50:1 but am not finished with the first run at 128:1 on the Dodge. A fuel mileage sample is over 1k miles and a check run on additive ought to be around 50k. I think that there are people running 256:1 with synthetic 2 cycle.What we are doing with out a laboratory is what the oil refiners should have done with their computers and data, that they did not do it leaves me a little suspicious of dastardly deeds to the favor of the equipment manufactures. YMMV and that is the subject of this web site!keydl

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Fixed you double post there Keydl.. LOL But its true the standards of fuel change on us and they would never say anything negative to hurt business so of course ULSD is suggested for use in all diesel fuel engine regardless of the fact you engine was designed for LSD (500 ppm sulfur). Of course the labs would never waste money on testing if they don't have to... :wow

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I think that the design of both engines fuel systems predates limitations on how to make diesel from the government other than that they post the cetane in some states.Most of the design changes in mechanical injection were pretty well set by the middle 60's with only refinements for longer life and cheaper manufacture cost.They got a dose of 3rd world reality with the GM 5.7, not a large safety factor and most that worked on them did not follow the book. Even at the dealers shop - I was in a Buick shop in the early 70's and moved on to an AC tractor shop when the EPA sent a letter promising a $2500 fine for making the cars run well at over 5000 ft altitude. Each car. The next 10 years the air pollution got a lot worse, was the letter part of the cause? It made a difference in the shop where it was posted, the dyno was traded for a 3 gas analyser. Dad closed his shop and worked as shop forman for Chev until he retired. He took 11 of the 14 help with him to Chev. Between 72 and the early 80's there was no altitude compensation for gas engines, just turboed diesel would run properly. By the mid 90's the fuel injection computers worked correctly at 10,000 ft.If I have to buy replacement parts and they are current production, they will probably work with the current fuel and have a normal service life. But if they are old inventory.....When the LSD came it mostly only did in the high hours pump seals - the competence and honesty of the shop was the difference between a $200 seal and a $5000 bill for the same seal and the pump it was in. Local shop and a out of state dealer.You followed the dealers advise and bought a pump but then the connection with the safety sheets pointed out the advertising that the additive makers was deceptive - as proved by the thedieselplace tests that you post. I read a little of the posts ( I paid a lot of money for this mouse milk because of the advertising and I can't be wrong - so you are insane ). If that had not got your competitive spirit up I would probably not found the 2 cycle posts.I still need to get a paste piece to answer the - 2cycle is not designed for diesel - stuff. 2 2cycle is designed for reciprocating engines. Diesel reciprocates as opposed the the Mazda rotary. It may have worked for the short seal life on the rotary engine as well.My opinion is still that the increased fuel mileage comes from better lube on the upper piston ring and that engines with moly rings will not show much increase but chrome rings will.keydl

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Keydl, the last sentence in your above post about the chrome vs moly rings, brings up a past memory from a thread I asked in thedieselgarage some time ago. I went into the GM Duramax section and asked those guys if they were running 2cycle in there Dmax's. Most responded saying they lost mpg's running 2cycle. A very few responded saying they run it for lubricity purposes. I wonder if the Dmax engine is moly ringed? My opinion is the 2cycle is good for everything in the fuel system and cylinders. It seems that the most popular users of 2cycle are us Cummins and Powerstroke owners. All I know is, 2cycle makes a seat of the pants difference in the way my truck runs. HarryUpdate=I went back and checked that thread in TDG, MoparMan enlightend them later in the thread, suggested they try a lighter dose of 2cycle, like 200:1, one guy tried it and responded with positive results. So 2cycle is good, even in the Dmax. Harry

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Chrome is a hard material and not very slippery, cast iron rings are a specialty for racing and other problem applications, moly rings are a little higher priced, the kind of perk that you would expect in a high priced engine ( maybe ).Chrome color on the rings means that, they are not quite so shinny after use and when the chrome wears off the cast iron color shows - I am not aware of any engine new from the factory with cast iron rings.Molly rings are black and turn over during assembly with less effort, the last 300 Ford that I put togather had a little difference on the cam and a 2 deg key for cam timing and molly rings. In just under 2k miles the fuel mileage had come up about 2 mpg form 9.1 to 11 on a ton truck. I replaced the engine because the front main was shimmed, all the bearings gaged out with plastigage except the front. Feeling poor and needing the truck I bought 2 sets of mains and shimmed the bearing and got a core to rebuild so I could just swap engines. The molly rings were $15 more but I think that came back in fuel savings in 4-5 months.keydl

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