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sticky anyone...i'll add a tidbit. that chart is missing a little info, you should have ambient temp/ humidity and temp out of the vent. high humidity will have warmer air out the vent because some of the "cool" is absorbed as water vapor condenses.

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sticky anyone...i'll add a tidbit. that chart is missing a little info, you should have ambient temp/ humidity and temp out of the vent. high humidity will have warmer air out the vent because some of the "cool" is absorbed as water vapor condenses.

I left that out since I was more explaining how it worked rather than vent temp, but I will throw that on there too. :thumbup2: Humidity part will just have to be known. I think the ambient chart is plenty good. I just wanted to get the components labeled for everyone mainly.

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I left that out since I was more explaining how it worked rather than vent temp, but I will throw that on there too. :thumbup2: Humidity part will just have to be known. I think the ambient chart is plenty good. I just wanted to get the components labeled for everyone mainly.

well, if you are looking at this thread, than your probably don't know about A/C systems, or trying to fix yours. humidity plays a large part in output. THIS CHART IS NOT FOR DODGE RAMs post-98-138698167547_thumb.jpg you can see here how humidity can change expected pressures and output of the vent. the percentages on the right is outdoor humidity. i don't want someone to think there A/C is jacked up when its working properly
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Now that is neat! Good work Guesswho. I might have to get a calculator going factoring humidity in, gives you what pressure is needed high and low to get the desired temp. Sounds like it would take some work but is interesting so I might have to figure out how to do it. Is that chart for R134?

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I left that out since I was more explaining how it worked rather than vent temp, but I will throw that on there too. :thumbup2:

Humidity part will just have to be known. I think the ambient chart is plenty good. I just wanted to get the components labeled for everyone mainly.

Then I need to correct here.

This system has no expansion valve, it has an orifice tube. Not too many newer systems have expansion valves anymore. most systems use orifice tubes that slip inside the line prior to the evaporator.

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Then I need to correct here. This system has no expansion valve, it has an orifice tube. Not too many newer systems have expansion valves anymore. most systems use orifice tubes that slip inside the line prior to the evaporator.

Thanks W&F! I wasn't sure with a lot of it, main reason I keep making these component threads :lol: So I changed expansion valve to orifice tube, but do I need to change all the expanding stuff too? I am starting to think it works by having an orifice to limit flow, this limit makes the condenser build very high pressure, the orifice lets the refrigerant out slowly but also goes from a small hole at high pressure to a large area resulting in low pressure and very cold temperatures. Is that correct? I was wondering why the expansion valve pics didn't look like anything on mine, but I knew it was hot and went cold at that orifice tube thing, so now I know why!

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Is that chart for R134?

yes it is for a vehicle with R134a. this chart came out of 1994 honda accord FSM(the first one i had handy). i noticed the 2001 dodge ram FSM didn't list #'s based on humidity, but has a range of acceptable psi/temps.

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so, how does all that junk get built up around the evaporator even though it's inside the dash.....this seems to be the common failure point in chrysler AC systems.....mine went out after only 3 years....

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Also, It's my understanding that the accum/drier is the last step, not the evap. It starts at the compressor then to the condensor, to orifice tube then evap then accum/drier and back to comp again. If you cut it in half...it's the hot side from comp to orifice tube. cold side from evap to comp.Maybe this is what you were saying and I read it wrong, my apologies if that's the case or I'm mistaken.It's been quite a few years since I worked on a/c.

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You're killing me Mike! :evilgrin: Fixed it. Thanks guesswho, good thing you're back around again :lol:

sorry to break your balls but you changed the name of the link,, but its still pointing to the old location...so its still dead. it tries to find mopar.mopar1973man.com...... so basically its still the old link with new text. on a lighter note, its good to be back.

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Hi folks! I have been doing commercial refrigeration for over 20 yrs. and thought I would chime in. All refrigeration and a/c systems are basically the same. They do vary when it comes to controls and components but the principle is constant. Here is a quick rundown of what takes place inside the lines of a typical refer. system.Refrigeration is a cycle. Starting at the compressor suction side you have a low pressure low temp gas. The compressor converts it into a high temp. high press. gas. The refrigerant is then cooled in the condenser where it changes state to a high temp. high pressure liquid. The liquid is then sent to a metering device, be it a capillary tube, thermostatic expansion valve, or an orifice. At this point that high pressure high temp liquid is forced through a tiny hole where it instantly loses it's density and pressure and turns into a low pressure low temp. vapor. This takes place at the inlet of the evaporator. When heat from the conditioned space is absorbed by this cold vapor it converts back into a low temp low pressure gas. It then heads to the accumulator which is a protective device for the compressor. The accumulator insures that no liquid reaches the compressor. After the accumulator the low pressure low temp gas heads back to the compressor to start the circuit again.

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