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stodg73

Suggested Upgrades for Diesels

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stodg73

Upgrading your diesel.

In order to upgrade your diesel from stock, you should have a baseline of readings in order to know what has changed. Also, if you do multiple upgrades at one time and something goes wrong, you will not know which upgrade caused the problem or error code.

In order to know what is happening to the engine, you should have at the minimum compliment of aftermarket gauges. At the minimum for Dodges, you need a fuel pressure gauge, boost gauge, and EGT gauge. Those with automatic transmissions should also have a transmission temperature gauge. With these gauges and a stock engine you will proceed to gather information as to how well the engine is running. Starting with a baseline of readings, you will be able to determine what is happening to the engine and transmission as you add more upgrades.

The suggested order for upgrades should be as follows:

1. Gauges: http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/3114-Dodge-Gauges

2. Better intake, i.e. CAI, ram air, etc.

3. Bigger exhaust, 4” is for about 500 HP, 5” for 500+ HP and deeper sound

4. Transmission, i.e. better clutch for manuals or stronger bands, billet input shaft, torque converter, valve body, etc. for auto’s

5. Fuel system

6. Larger injectors

7. Fueling box or chip, timing

8. Larger turbo

By doing these upgrades in this suggested order, you will be able to know what is happening to your engine as they are being added.

With the addition of gauges, the next step is to get the air into and out of the engine, as diesels are large air pumps. The easier in, the easier out, the cooler the engine will run, i.e. lower EGT temps, and less of a chance of damaging the engine.

Most transmissions are sometimes just barely able to hold the stock power that is produced. When you start upgrading the engine, the transmission will start to suffer. So upgrading the transmission before it is destroyed/slipping is easier than buying a new or replacement.

When upgrading the fuel system, you can get a larger lift pump to supply more fuel to the injection pump. When doing this you should also upgrade the fuel delivery lines to a larger size. This is to allow or more fuel to be moved from the tank to the IP, and the excess fuel is returned to the tank along with cooling the injector pump.

The next upgrade should be injectors. Depending on your application is what type of injector that you will need. For Dodges with the VP-44 injection pump, the most common are RV275’s which give about 45 hp.

The fueling box/chip and timing promoter can be any number of manufacturers. Depending on your application, is what type of electronic device that you will want. With certain electronics, you can stack them with others. Therefore, whichever chip/programmer that you choose, be sure that you do your research.

Now, in considering a larger turbo, you need to think about the application. Also, think about twins, triples, or quads, these are also known as compound turbos. When going to a larger turbo, there comes into play the turbo lag. The spool up of the turbo may become a problem , as to making excess smoke when just applying light amounts of throttle. When using compound turbos, the smaller turbo fills in for the turbo lag of the larger one. Making the smoke problem easier to control.

More Information to be added.

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DieselD24

I was wondering what order things would need to go about to achieve proper results. From the list 1-8, I have #7, I think the previous owner was gonna start from seven and work his way back.Good info though, I will definately use this as a reference in the future.

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volkswagon

I did #1-5 then 7 in that order. Mostly because of circumstance and how the funds were available but I'm really glad now that it worked in that order and I'd recommend it.

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ISX

I was wondering what order things would need to go about to achieve proper results. From the list 1-8, I have #7, I think the previous owner was gonna start from seven and work his way back.

Good info though, I will definately use this as a reference in the future.

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Heavyd1980

that is a great list! thank you. ISX i think the fuel system is referring to an aftermarket lift pump!!! which we all know is super impotant for those vp owners!!!

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ISX

that is a great list! thank you. ISX i think the fuel system is referring to an aftermarket lift pump!!! which we all know is super impotant for those vp owners!!!

Yeah I just saw DieselD24's post and instantly took off writing. Then I scrolled up and saw Stodg had everything explained already :doh: But it made me feel good inside :lmao:

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DieselD24

Agreed!But, my apologies for making you write such a long post.

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ISX

It's my job :lol: I don't have any problem writing long posts. I rarely get to do it. :hyper:

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dually

The turbo should be before injectors.Why add fuel and heat if you cant clean it up?By then you could of trashed a good head with heat cracks on the exhaust seats.The yahoo that had my truck before me did your list.He never did the last step (turbo)He added so much heat it killed the head.I shipped the head off to get tested and it had 11 cracks around one seat alone.About 20 in all.When you add fuel with injectors then get a programmer to add more fuel it can be a bad thing.Now grant it he beat on it hard.Just saying my .02

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ISX

The turbo should be before injectors.Why add fuel and heat if you cant clean it up?By then you could of trashed a good head with heat cracks on the exhaust seats.The yahoo that had my truck before me did your list.He never did the last step (turbo)He added so much heat it killed the head.I shipped the head off to get tested and it had 11 cracks around one seat alone.About 20 in all.When you add fuel with injectors then get a programmer to add more fuel it can be a bad thing.Now grant it he beat on it hard.Just saying my .02

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dually

I am not saying anything about power/hp.As the op stated on the list turbo was last and fuel/injectors/Fuel/with programmer came first.Thats cool to me it is a nice list.I just think more air in and out with a turbo should come before that.My truck came with 40 over injectors and a edge box and a cooked head.I added everything else,fresh head ,turbo.etc. EDIT, my point is your entire truck needs to work together.Building a truck in steps is how almost all of us do it.Egt's kill .A good turbo can keep them down.Also keep in mind my truck was pounded on.I mean what i have done to it is just murder, but I know when to let off. :lol:

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rburks

I was wondering what order things would need to go about to achieve proper results. From the list 1-8, I have #7, I think the previous owner was gonna start from seven and work his way back.

Good info though, I will definately use this as a reference in the future.

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DieselD24

Of course, I was gonna invest in a fuel gauge next. When my APPS went out, I immediately assumed that it was the lift pump but, as it turned out, I did a little bit more research, and found out I could pop the codes by cycling the ignition, which I did not know of. Anyway... to make a long story short, I had ordered a BD lift pump for $200 from a diesel performance shop from my assumption. Luckily I came across this site, did some reading and solved my issue. As for my assumption of the lift pump, I only assumed because it seemed to be a common failure on the VP44 style trucks. Yes, I know assuming only makes you look like an as* in the end. :banghead:For that reason only, I think it would be a wise idea to monitor my fuel pressure.

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rburks

Of course, I was gonna invest in a fuel gauge next.

When my APPS went out, I immediately assumed that it was the lift pump but, as it turned out, I did a little bit more research, and found out I could pop the codes by cycling the ignition, which I did not know of.

Anyway... to make a long story short, I had ordered a BD lift pump for $200 from a diesel performance shop from my assumption. Luckily I came across this site, did some reading and solved my issue.

As for my assumption of the lift pump, I only assumed because it seemed to be a common failure on the VP44 style trucks.

Yes, I know assuming only makes you look like an as* in the end. :banghead:

For that reason only, I think it would be a wise idea to monitor my fuel pressure.

Yes i agree, assumption is the mother of all screw-up's & i miss-understood your post, thought you already had gauges, they are very the best tool for preventive maint.

once you get your fuel pressure gauge in it will most likely tell you what most of us on here already have found out the hard way.. "THE STOCK LIFT PUMPS SUCK":spend:

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volkswagon

once you get your fuel pressure gauge in it will most likely tell you what most of us on here already have found out the hard way.. "THE STOCK LIFT PUMPS SUCK":spend:

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DieselD24

Correct me if I'm wrong but, I thought there were only mechanical gauges, and not electronic ones for fuel pressure.

Which one has the better advantage?

Now, I'm really curious as to what my fuel pressure really is. What's the general pressure window on stock lift pumps?

--- Update to the previous post...

I could be running 0 PSI too, and not even know it. :stuned:

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volkswagon
Correct me if I'm wrong but, I thought there were only mechanical gauges, and not electronic ones for fuel pressure.

Which one has the better advantage?

Right here is what I have. Got a whole gauge set like this from Diesel Auto Power

http://www.isspro.com/ev2.php

As for the advantage part I couldn't really say except that I'm really happy with these.

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DieselD24

Exactly which one did you get? Perhaps you can lead me in the right direction.

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volkswagon

I got the black face, black bezel, orange pointer ones. 0-40 psi fuel, pyro, trans temp, and 0-40 boost. 3 gauge pillar mount and a steering column mount. Is this the info you wanted?

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DieselD24

Yes, thank you. I'd like to get a 3 gauge pillar, but I'd also hate to relocate the Quad. :cry:

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DieselD24

It wasn't on there, but thanks. Very helpful link. :thumb1:

--- Update to the previous post...

Trans temp is also a must for me as well.

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