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self poweder coat


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Ive done it a bunch of times, but not within the past 3-4 yrs. I kept our old stove when we got a new one, and just put the old one in the garage. It's since died, and been hauled off, not yet replaced.Wife would have my nutsack if I was to try it in the 'new' one..

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I've seen people use them at home and it takes a bit to learn, (not long), but the products came out nice. One kid was making money doing it at home to pay his education. He sub-contracted out to local body shops and parts store near his home.

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Ive done it a bunch of times, but not within the past 3-4 yrs. I kept our old stove when we got a new one, and just put the old one in the garage. It's since died, and been hauled off, not yet replaced. Wife would have my nutsack if I was to try it in the 'new' one..

Did it last ? I dont really have access to a oven (RV) ...... but maybe when I get back into a house some stuff might get a refresh !! just curious
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yeah it lasts. key is preparation, and that's time consuming and tedious, but the results are worth the effort. the downside to using a standard oven is size-limitations.. bigger pieces may not fit, if your oven is smaller.

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yeah it lasts. key is preparation, and that's time consuming and tedious, but the results are worth the effort. the downside to using a standard oven is size-limitations.. bigger pieces may not fit, if your oven is smaller.

Pretty cool :thumb1: Worth to note for future ....... not hard to get a big oven and start powdercoating a bunch of stuff Yeah size will be limit ......... hmmm ..........
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I have that gun. Buy it directly from Eastwood and save a couple of bucks. The dual voltage gun works better than the single, especially if you are doing two coats of powder like one of their anodized coatings over silver or chrome powder. Most of their powders flow out at 450 and cure at 400 degrees.

As stated before, make sure the parts are to bare metal and cleaned with acetone to remove all the grease and oil from them, including the oil from your fingers. I have a Craftsman portable sandblaster that works pretty good and cost me around 100 dollars. You are limited in the size of what you can coat by the size of the oven. There are some people who have built larger ovens using the guts of an old one. You can get a used oven free if you look around. Another option is an IR lamp for big parts. I haven't tried this but a buddy of mine got one from Harbor Freight and used it coat a boat trailer.

The only thing I disagree with is it will apply over chrome, just make sure it's in good shape. Any defect in the chrome will show and cause the coating to break down.

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The chrome isn't affected by the heat of the cure as long as it’s in good shape the powder will adhear. I have done it a few times with faucet parts and crap around the house as well as friends wheels a while back. Still wearing well.
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