Jump to content

Thoughts on bolt in transmission pan adapter


Recommended Posts

I see that Geno's carries a bolt in after drilling transmission pan adapter to install a temperature sender. Seems you drill a hole in the tin pan and install the compression fitting. Does this sounds like a viable option to buying an after market aluminum pan for a couple three hundred bucks? My transmission is due for service and seems like a good time to add the temp gauge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Board Of Directors

Joe, you are so close to source Automotive I would go down there and make them an offer on a deep dish trans pan with the service drain and hold 4 extra qts. If your ever towing heavy in the mountains in summer you'll be very glad you did. It has the trans temp sensor stud already.It's a cool item :thumbup2:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't waste your time, I have several threads here on where to measure tranny temps and the oil in the pan is the coldest oil in the system as it has just returned from the cooler circuit.Accurate temps need to be taken at the converter outlet cooler line, the front one coming out of the tranny, this is the actual and hottest oil in the system. By the time you register the oil as hot in the pan it has already been burned long before hand as the oil in the pan will average 30-50 degrees cooler than coming out of the converter.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

What kind of fittings should I use? I hate hoses and clamps. Sounds better not having to mess with the sensor each time you remove the pan too.

Don't waste your time, I have several threads here on where to measure tranny temps and the oil in the pan is the coldest oil in the system as it has just returned from the cooler circuit. Accurate temps need to be taken at the converter outlet cooler line, the front one coming out of the tranny, this is the actual and hottest oil in the system. By the time you register the oil as hot in the pan it has already been burned long before hand as the oil in the pan will average 30-50 degrees cooler than coming out of the converter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you getting a true reading of temperature from the outside of the line? Or relative and need to boost up the true transmission reading? Obviously very simple.

I had one of these on my 97- never had any issues with it, and super easy to install move, etc. http://www.genosgarage.com/ACU-TEMP-ADAPTER-89-12/productinfo/ACUTEMP_ADAPTER/ cheap pricing too...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I knew, I was pretty accurate...I know my buddy who rebuilt the tranny for me ran his SnapOn diag tool on the tranny, when I was having issues similar to Rogan, and when he got to the tranny temp portion, it was pretty darn close, if not dead on what the gauge was reading.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I knew, I was pretty accurate...I know my buddy who rebuilt the tranny for me ran his SnapOn diag tool on the tranny, when I was having issues similar to Rogan, and when he got to the tranny temp portion, it was pretty darn close, if not dead on what the gauge was reading.

If you were reading from the pan it would be reading close to the factory temp sensor as it is located in the Valvebody which is picking up the cooler oil from the pan. I wouldn't make any bets of accuracy in the sensor being held to the outside of the line.
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Board Of Directors

Don't waste your time, I have several threads here on where to measure tranny temps and the oil in the pan is the coldest oil in the system as it has just returned from the cooler circuit. Accurate temps need to be taken at the converter outlet cooler line, the front one coming out of the tranny, this is the actual and hottest oil in the system. By the time you register the oil as hot in the pan it has already been burned long before hand as the oil in the pan will average 30-50 degrees cooler than coming out of the converter.

I just allow for the discrepancy on my trans temps. I works fine as a warning. I really like mine.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ordered the line from Rock Auto. I'm due for a Trans service. I'll just have my transmission guy install it while he does the service. No real description provided. Does it include the correct size fitting for 1/8" sensors? Any trick to removing the check valve ball?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I ordered the line from Rock Auto. I'm due for a Trans service. I'll just have my transmission guy install it while he does the service. No real description provided. Does it include the correct size fitting for 1/8" sensors? Any trick to removing the check valve ball?

If you get the Rockauto (Dorman) 1996ish line with the trans temp port, you MUST replace the flex line, as it has ANOTHER check valve in it. I believe I used #8 fittings at 8" in length made by a local diesel shop. Ed

The ball is just soft rubber and pops out easily with an o-ring pick or small screw driver, no need for any other line to be made or modified ect and the sensor fitting is for 1/8th inch pipe for standard sensors and is built right onto the pipe one piece right where it exits the tranny.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried for hours to remove the little ball. I have every assortment of pic in the world & just couldn't get it out. That is why I just had a line made up. It cost a whopping $8.00 to be made from 3500PSI hose if I remember right. I am sure it also has better flow potential, too.Ed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried for hours to remove the little ball. I have every assortment of pic in the world & just couldn't get it out. That is why I just had a line made up. It cost a whopping $8.00 to be made from 3500PSI hose if I remember right. I am sure it also has better flow potential, too. Ed

Did you take the fitting out of the heat exchanger and try taking the ball out of that fitting at that point or did you just try the one in the new line? It doesn't matter which one is removed, could be Dorman has a larger ball or different shaped fitting flares or uses a harder material in the ball than Chrysler does I have never seen a Dorman line to compare. I have installed a few lines and all were from Chrysler and all popped out in a couple seconds with an o-ring pick.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I left the one in the brass fitting of the heat exchanger. On the Dorman line ($24) on Ebay, the spot where the ball resided only had like a 3/16 hole for the fluid to flow. The #8 line was much bigger & would allow alot more flow. When I do my shift kit/servos/torque converter.rebuild, I will do the full flow mod & remove the check valve on the exchanger.Ed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can you expand more on the full flow mod? I understand the concept, but procedure and explain why the manufacturer had a check ball anyway. Thanks!

Do not pull both check valves out, just pull one or the other doesn't matter. The reason they are in there is so that if parked on a slope or for extended periods of time it doesn't back drain the entire cooling circuit oil back through the converter back into the pan, helps keep the system from getting aerated too having to fill the cooling circuit every time the rig is started.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for that.

I assume that install of the new line will take cutting and flairing of the old line? Sure like flaired fittings as opposed to hose clamps!

- - - Updated - - -

Joe, you are so close to source Automotive I would go down there and make them an offer on a deep dish trans pan with the service drain and hold 4 extra qts. If your ever towing heavy in the mountains in summer you'll be very glad you did. It has the trans temp sensor stud already.

It's a cool item :thumbup2:

I'm not a huge fan of Source Automotive. But may allow them to install one of their valve bodies.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...