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This morning it was -9deg Fahrenheit and I believe it got down below -16 last night. I don't have any fuel additive in my truck as I only run 2 stroke oil. I was able to get the fuel inside the filter warm enough to get me to school with 10 psi of fuel pressure  :cry:. After some classes I went and bought some diesel 911, and poured a little more than the suggested amount into the tank. The fuel pressure returned to normal as expected. Will having the 2 stroke and diesel 911 in the tank together hurt anything?? Is there a different additive I should use during the winter instead of 2 stroke? Or should combine 2 stroke with something else during the winter? I know plugging it in would be best, but living on the 3rd floor of an apartment makes that option impossible. Thanks in advance!

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Pretty wild the amount of gelling issues people have been having.

 

I would find a product that will reduce the pour point to meet your needs. But this should be handled by local fuel suppliers but once again its shocking how many rigs I've heard of gelling up.

 

So check your local part store for what you got available. Then you might do a bit of research and get the MSDS sheets for each on and look and see how much solvents are in the product. Then you at least have a clue if you would need extra lube or not.

 

Personally I don't like to mix products. But also I took the time to research all my local fuel suppliers and have a good relationship with all the store owners. So I know if they meet the standard or don't.

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What exactly should I look for in the msds sheet? I have heard good things about Howes but I don't know what I'm looking for. http://www.howeslube.com/dieseltreat.php - the msds sheet is on the page

http://www.powerservice.com/msds/ - Diesel 911 is what I used

 

I figured mixing wasn't good, but I thought under 10psi of fuel pressure was even worse.

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YEP! This morning when I got off work, I had 15 psi instead of 20. It was -4 this morning! Wow, I forgot how cold the cold feels when it gets into the subs! We were under a warning due to our winds which was taking us down to -20! My 7gal propane tank lasted 3 days...

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I'd only use  the   911  as  needed.     (something  tells me  that  stuff  may not be too friendly on  seals/rubber)    I  used  plenty  this fall,  in just about  every diesel  powered machine I have...  but  have  been  getting by  since   religiously   keeping    howes  or  power service   in the mix. The  power service stuff  claims  they have  'slik diesel'  lube added...(if that makes  a difference!)      The  underground   supply tanks  are keeping  the  fuel  above  ambient temp,  and   putting in  the  conditioner  as you fill will help the  fuel  much more than  as  an afterthought.    (which most   'conditioners'  really  don't  help  AFTER the  fuel is   snotted up.

 

Mike  said he is  shocked at the amount of  fuel problems this winter.  Just  goes to show  that  the  quality/standards   in   fuel oils   has   tanked.   I've  burned  a LOT  of fuel in the last 35 years.... it's pretty obvious  in the  changes!   Plus    are the  service stations  being  totally honest  with us  on  their  claimed    'blends'???   Not  to mention  if  you've   had  biodiesel  contamination....   That's  a whole nother matter.

 

I've been running   2 stroke  and   whatever  conditioner is  warranted (seasonally)    for  a couple of  years.      I am no  chemist,  but  all I can  say  is  I  don't  believe  I've had  any   detrimental  results..  

I  actually  feel   'safer'  with the  2 stroke  in there,  along  with the    conditioner.

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But at what percent by volume?

Xylene is also found in treated diesel fuel (in very small quantities), and most all fuel treatments.

Is the Xylene supposed to lube everything? I will run this tank down low to get the diesel911 out. After that should I mix Howes and 2 stroke, or just use the howes?

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Your not suppose to run two stroke and an additive, something about it cancels each other out.

 

I can't believe the amount of vehicles gelling up this year. I think somebody tried making a quick buck on running summer blend as long as possible beings the last couple of winters have been mild

Edited by mopartechnician
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But at what percent by volume?

Xylene is also found in treated diesel fuel (in very small quantities), and most all fuel treatments.

 

Yes this is true Xylene is a PPD (pour point depressant) which aids in preventing gelling. The amount added is what going to change the pour point of the diesel fuel. If you can find specs of fuel you find the Xylene content will go up as winter cold temps go down.

 

Is the Xylene supposed to lube everything? I will run this tank down low to get the diesel911 out. After that should I mix Howes and 2 stroke, or just use the howes?

 

Xylene is a paint thinner basically and not a very good lubricant. Mostly used as a cleaning solvent and pour point reduction.

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Didn't know about that link. Thank you.

 

Yes this is true Xylene is a PPD (pour point depressant) which aids in preventing gelling. The amount added is what going to change the pour point of the diesel fuel. If you can find specs of fuel you find the Xylene content will go up as winter cold temps go down.

 

 

Xylene is a paint thinner basically and not a very good lubricant. Mostly used as a cleaning solvent and pour point reduction.

So going by the spreadsheet in the article mopartechnician quoted, adding almost any anti-gel formula is not going to give the VP adequate lubing? 

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Any quality anti gel will also have a lubricant in it. What people fail to realize is this is what they have been designed to do...Power Service is readily available at most auto parts stores. Amsoil and Schaeffer's are also quality anti gels. I personally keep Schaeffer's stocked in the garage, it protects against gelling, is a good lubricant and is Cummins L10 approved, and costs as much per gallon to treat as running 2. Stroke oil. Best of both worlds.

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