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hey guys just a quick question

 

i changed fuel filters the other day because it had been about 10000 miles since the last change. the fuel inside was crystallizing and almost snot-like consistency lol

 

anyways, my question here is: which anti-gel?

 

i have read the HFRR testing article on here, i have read other testings, and it looks like opti lube is the way to go, but theres a few different ones that contain anti-gel

 

but my concerns are that it claims to boost cetane which i thought wasnt a good thing? i need an anti-gel to use this winter because last winter i did have 1 instance of gelling with a wind chill of -15, supposed to be worse this year.. 

 

please school me on the cetane situation with this stuff, and what i should/shouldnt run

 

thanks guys!

Edited by Ltk
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Personally I would get the optilube.  The HFRR speaks for itself and cetane isn't a bad thing.  The higher the cetane, the more readily the fuel ignites.  In the winter when diesel sure isn't readily igniting, higher cetane helps.  Biodiesel has a very high cetane and on a cold morning it starts up in half a crank whereas regular diesel cranks a few times.  No matter what antigel you use, it will raise cetane, its just the nature of antigel, so why not use the one that won't sacrifice lube.  

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Over in the Scandanavian countries, they are using rapeseed as the base for theor bio diesel & it is causing a world of hurt in the IPs. Check out Deiselmeche on FB about it. He's the Superpump guru for the mercs/BMWs & such. He also does about any IP there is. Been having huge issues with it. Rapeseed does have a higher tield per acre than corn in thrie climate.

Ed

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If you need a boost in cloud point add a product but don't get mindless and continue to add the product to long or too much. Make sure measure out what your doing. Cetane is a good thing for dead cold starts. But once the engine is running high cetane in no longer needed. More a less a trade off easier starting higher cetane. Better MPG's lower cetane. :shrug:

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alright so opti lube it is. should i do xdp or their winter blend?

also i take it i shouldnt keep using 2 stroke while im using this anti-gel?

mike you say dont keep using it, what do you mean? can i use it every fill all winter or what? ive never added anything but 2 stroke so im curious why i shouldnt run it too long?

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Hmmmm..my old Caterpillar engines (1930s) have the fuel filter housing surrounded by antifreeze. 

The warmer the engine the warmer the fuel. I do beleive its also controlled by a regulator (thermostat).

Any engines of today use this idea.

I should also mention these engines have a pony engine to start the main engine.

This is a small 2 cylinder gas engine that heats and rolls over the big engine....big engine is 12 or 14 litres.

Cold weather is no problem then for either engine.

Not exactly as fast as the electric start with the toaster in the intake manifold.

 

Regards Chris

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Hmmmm..my old Caterpillar engines (1930s) have the fuel filter housing surrounded by antifreeze. 

The warmer the engine the warmer the fuel. I do believe its also controlled by a regulator (thermostat).

Any engines of today use this idea.

I should also mention these engines have a pony engine to start the main engine.

This is a small 2 cylinder gas engine that heats and rolls over the big engine....big engine is 12 or 14 litres.

Cold weather is no problem then for either engine.

Not exactly as fast as the electric start with the toaster in the intake manifold.

 

Regards Chris

 

 

Ran a D-8 years ago with a pony motor and cable blade.  Fired pretty well but we don't normally get much  colder than high teens and that's not too often.

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Over in the Scandanavian countries, they are using rapeseed as the base for theor bio diesel & it is causing a world of hurt in the IPs. Check out Deiselmeche on FB about it. He's the Superpump guru for the mercs/BMWs & such. He also does about any IP there is. Been having huge issues with it. Rapeseed does have a higher tield per acre than corn in thrie climate.

Ed

Just  so  everyone knows  here:   Another  factoid  of  our  Great American   'Correctness'      Cue  game show music!

Dept of  Agriculture  spent   millions  and millions  of  dollars  to change the name  from  Rapeseed,  to   tadaaa.... Canola.      Less offending name.

 

Back  to  regular  scheduled broadcasting!

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Hmmmm..my old Caterpillar engines (1930s) have the fuel filter housing surrounded by antifreeze. 

The warmer the engine the warmer the fuel. I do beleive its also controlled by a regulator (thermostat).

Any engines of today use this idea.

I should also mention these engines have a pony engine to start the main engine.

This is a small 2 cylinder gas engine that heats and rolls over the big engine....big engine is 12 or 14 litres.

Cold weather is no problem then for either engine.

Not exactly as fast as the electric start with the toaster in the intake manifold.

 

Regards Chris

a  lot of  semi tractors  are spec'd  with   coolant  heated  devices.     Either inline, or  in-tank.    I ordered  an inline type  from  Arctic fox   about 12 days ago  (still waiting patiently)  to put on  my  winter  chore ag  tractor.

 

.....edit....     Called   Arctic-Fox  today (12-22-14)   to see  where in  SamHill   my  inline heater  is!     "Hang on,  let me check"..     "Well,   it shows we have  1 in stock,   we'll send it out today."

Ordered it   12-03-14.   :doh:     So much  for  being  prepared this winter!

Edited by rancherman
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If you need a boost in cloud point add a product but don't get mindless and continue to add the product to long or too much. Make sure measure out what your doing. Cetane is a good thing for dead cold starts. But once the engine is running high cetane in no longer needed. More a less a trade off easier starting higher cetane. Better MPG's lower cetane. :shrug:

yep...   the  alkyd's  and  some other mumbo jumbo  chemistry  used  ESPECIALLY IN  BIO   raises  the  cetane,  and  lowers  the  btu's.     *impossible to  have both* 

Some  have  argued  (probably  theoretically)  that the higher  cetane  (  AKA  in the  'old days' )  as   HIGH SPEED DIESEL.     worked really well  in  the   early  diesels  that  were  turning  24-2800  rpm  going down the road.   (early 70's onward)      'Grunt'  engines   in the   ag, construction, etc    did  fine  on  the  'low speed fuel'.

As  displacement and  technology  progressed  in the next    30 yrs.    the   typical   large   diesel  rpm's  dropped again   14-1600   is    typical   otr    engine  duty..    and  the  higher  flame speed   isn't near as   critical.    

We now have  pretty good  timing  management  versus  the old days  of  a  'set'  curve..  and    these  days    the   efficiency  differences   in the fuel   is  pretty negligible.

 

I'd imagine a  balls-out   engine  that is  winging   4-6000  rpm   would most  definitely  appreciate  the  highest  cetane  possible.

 

I read a neat  article  about measuring  cetane.    they    inject   the  test fuel into an  already  pressurized  vessel..    and they  'time'  the   instant  the pressure   spikes.     high cetane is  a quicker  'light-up'

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