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hex0rz

Skid steers

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With the recent sale of my 5ther, my bonds have finally been released of that debt! It has been refreshing to finally realize that i no longer have that hanging over my head!

 

While i do plan on saving money, sometimes money must also be invested. We've been thinking on priority purchases, and an agreement was made that we want a skid steer. Preferably before winter so it can be used for snow removal. I also want it to use to move my beehives. It's going to get allot of use in that department as i keep growing my apiary. 

 

Then there's need for it with other attachments that it can take the place of a tractor. If need be i can do odd jobs with it and make some extra money on the side. 

 

This was how i was able to justify the purchase. Otherwise it would have been a snow plow. Which can be used only for one thing and only during one season of the year. 

 

Now, my problem is, i know NOTHING about skid steers. Bobcat is pretty much the only brand i think ill go with considering the attachments they have available. That and the conversion kits that are made for them to use in beehive logistics will only for bobcat. 

 

So the question is which model? Definitely don't want to break the bank doing this either. Who knows their stuff about the little machines? School me, oh wise people!

Edited by hex0rz

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I think skid steers use a standard mounting system.  If this is true then skid steer attachments are pretty much interchangeable between manufacturers.  This would mean that you wouldn't necessarily have to buy a Bobcat to use any special Bobcat or other manufacturer attachments. 

 

I think you could shop for the skid steer feature set and price that would work for you.  I don't own a skid steer but I have many hours on them.  Mostly CAT and diesel engines.

 

You will also need a suitable trailer to move your skid steer from location to location if you are likely to do odd jobs with it.

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I'm hoping to stop by an equipment place Friday and pick their brain about it more too. I thought i read something about adapter plates or something...

 

My plan is to get a tandem dump trailer that ill haul it with. It's quite surprising how light some of them are. 

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Like war eagle said the attachments are all universal and work on all brands as they all use the same universal quicktach plate anymore. Only thing would be possibly different hydraulic coupler ends if running any auxiliary hydraulic attachments or high flow. Now days all the skidsteers are pretty decent quality, find one you are comfortable with and have local parts and service for. Since these are hydraulic machines make sure to find one that has been serviced religiously. If you start having issues with pumps and drive motors these will hit the pocket book really hard really quick.

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One of the first noticeable things to look at on a used skid steer would be the condition of the front bucket, you could have a general idea of what it was used for and if it was abused or not, also overall condition of machine Ike dents scrapes, tires etc... just like buying a used truck. 

 

Iif you find one that fits you, familerize your self with controls and gauges and find a safe spot and learn to operate it by starting out at a low rpm and checking functions and gradually work up to a higher rpm checking controls and functions ( be careful if you've never operated one they have tremendous power for such a small machine) and can be deadly on un even terrain. I would test it out as long as I could getting it up to operating temp . And check engine and hyd. Fluids for contamination and such. 

Like said by w&f , service and previous use of machine means a lot. 

Also tracked machines are a great alternative to a rubber tire machine 

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Another HUGE consideration (especially if you'll spend a lot of time in it) is the type of controls

Hand / Foot

T bar Hand

Joystick etc.

 

I spent a lot of time in one of CAT's biggest track machines (diesel). It was nice and comfortable, but I was less than pleased with the speed and the hydraulic system. It did not have the power it should have for weighing 10k lbs. Started and ran well, just seemed 'lazy'

This one had joystick controls which I liked, but heard they were expensive if the electronics went bad.

 

I spent a decent amount of time in a small Bobcat (gas) and was happy with it's performance, but it wasn't as stable as I like. The biggest downfall of these is the price. They're ridiculous around here

This one had hand / foot controls. I didn't like them

 

I spent a decent amount of time in a smaller (gas) case and had no complaints other than the controls which weren't the easiest to be smooth.

 

I spent a ton of time in a decent sized gehl (60hp diesel) and was very pleased with it. It was a very stable machine no matter what terrain I was working in. It started in negative temperatures without a problem and had way more than enough power. It could lift way more than it should too.

This one had T bar controls, which were easy to operate for many hours at a time.

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Well guys, after trying to learn weekday i could about these machines, i pulled the trigger on one! 2003 Bobcat 763G! I believe they call it bobtach? Digital controls no key. Pretty neat. 

 

Bought it from a business owner that has his own well drilling and pump business. He said he's 2nd owner and bought it in Arizona with 60 hours on it. 

 

Moved up here to ID and then used it to help build his house! Guy has one heck of a place. Literally! He said after that mainly used it to do snow removal at his place. But he also said he would have some of his guys do snow removal at his place of business and he also had hydraulic outriggers attached at the back for his backhoe attachment. 

 

He said it was serviced regularly and had a shop do most the work. I seen all the filters had dates and hours on them...

 

Upon startup it didn't blow any smoke except the startup smoke being diesel.. Its got a Kubota engine in it. Looking at the fluids they seemed fine. All were at good levels and nothing seemed out of place like washout or milky etc. So the engine seems in good working order.

 

The structure didn't have any extra hardening or plating or extra welds. No cracks that i could see. Paint looked like it was good also for its hours. Has about 3350 hours on it. 

 

He said the bushings were replaced not long ago also. No leaky cylinders either. Most pivot points look greased. Bucket seems to be in good shape. Gave me chains for the tires also. Tires appear 50%?

 

Mostly looks like and seems like a decent machine at its hour reading. I do have a few concerns about some things i noticed though. 

 

1. This machine is a hand/foot control machine. I dunno how sensitive they are supposed to be but the guy said they'll need adjusted every so often?

 

The left hand control has slop in it and the machine will creep to the right. So last night i figured out how to raise the cab and lock the arms up. 

 

Upon looking more closely, the right control looks tight and little slop. The left on the other hand, appears that the linkage is sloppy at the pump area. Looks like a square peg protrudes from the pump? The link that mates to this part appears to look like it's worn out. There also appears to be fluid leaking from this point also. 

 

2. Behind a couple wheels, there appears to be wetness. in assuming the wheel seals are wore out..

 

3. I dunno if i can source a manual for this machine, but i know next to nothing about the machine or engine. I need to figure out how to keep the machine in order and what's required of the engine. 

 

I say this because it at idle it seems to have a bit funky rattle sound. I've experienced this before with boom lifts and whatnot on job sites, but naturally it wasn't my duty to look into these things.

 

What says you guys, any input on this?

20170915_174909.jpg

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Go on line and find a downloadable service manual, it will be your best friend on repairs like that. You can probably find a parts and operators manual too.

 

with that amount of hours Im sure it has a lot of life left in, although it may have a few issues, but hopefully nothing you can't take care of.

 

as got the hand/foot controls that's common on just about all of them that I've been around, you will get used to them.

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I couldn't find any sites to download the manual from. But is available on Amazon for 50 dollars lol. 

 

I'm going to call a local machinery shop and see if they can give it a look over and see if they see something i don't. 

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The download versions are usually penny's on the dollar compared to the acuual hard copies, mostly they are just reprints. so sometimes the clarity is not that great. I would check out all the reviews on one before I ordered it. 

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I agree I would get a service manual for it. It will prove to be very helpful on how to access different areas for servicing. Other than that basically its just another name of diesel engine but the basics are still the same. 

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Probably has a V2203 Kubota, I just repowered a tractor i bought last summer with one. they are great engines.

Can I ask how much you paid for it. The bobcat skid steers are built right here in ND, That one was most likely Built in Bismarck. They do not build them in Bismarck anymore after Doosan bought them out several years back they now build attachments in that factory.

Edited by Wild and Free

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Looks like a nice little machine!

1 - Not sure?? Other than keeping everything in the center of its travel.

2 - The one side creeping is normal if the stick is out of adjustment as well. There should me a centering mechanism that keeps the stick in the "middle" of its range when you aren't touching it. You should be able to adjust the linkages to make it stop moving.  Since you have some slop it might need replaced or at the least tightened, then adjusted properly.

 

Not sure about your idle. Mine lopes at idle, but is fine once its warm. I haven't found anything that could cause that, and was told 1 - the machine isn't made to run at idle, and 2 - If it isn't at operating temp it likely won't run right either.

 

Does it have removable skid plates? If it does, pull them and power wash it for a couple hours. It'll help you find leaks / issues quickly with everything clean.

Post more pictures!

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Anybody point me in the direction for a digital manual?

 

Im not used to basing things off of hours, so the concept of what use and abuse is, is new to me. 

 

Paid 11400 for it. Or i should say will... guy wouldn't go any lower then that. Has auxiliary hydraulic hookups and mounting brackets for a backhoe attachment. Came with a regular bucket no teeth. Like i said gave me tire chains also. I think he said he had a spare tire but i forgot to ask. 

 

I dunno if it has removable skid plates. When i flipped the cab up i wanted to wash it. It wasn't terrible, just not clean. 

 

These are all the pics i have for now..

20170915_223631.jpg

20170915_223304.jpg

20170915_170826.jpg

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You were in the average ball park price range for that machine since he threw in a set of tire chains for the hours. That model is about the most common one around, they are everywhere and were built for a long time so parts are easily available. Another thing that could be leaking behind the wheels are the chain case access covers. One needs to check and adjust the chain tension every so often as well. Wouldn't hurt to check it when you get a chance also a good time to check the oil in the chain cases too, this is one area that is vastly overlooked on these machines. 

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https://spokane.craigslist.org/hvo/d/bobcat-763/6309847165.html

 

Here's one that was just posted recently. It's 14k though. 

 

I forgot to mention that. I did find that these were very popular models so i decided this is the model i wanted. I was looking to get either an s175, 753, 763 or 773. I couldn't get something that was too heavy because i have to factor that in when hauling it AND bees.

 

I'll have to learn where these access covers are. I know there is a plug in the front for something. Is that what you mean?

 

I called a local equipment shop and they said bring it by and they would take a look at it. Give me a few tips and let me know what they thought. They charge 75 an hour in the shop and 100 an hour in the field for any work.

 

As with many things there always seems to be something that they are known for. Like the 53 block for us or the vp44 fuel pressure problem. What are the things that make these machines tick?

 

I'm going to start looking at renting attachments. 75 a day for a skeleton grapple so i can start cutting firewood. Im way late on that!

 

Harley rake is 150 a day so i can groom the driveway and road out to county. That'll be nice to finally have a road without potholes and rocks throwing me around every time. 

 

Your right, i think i will wonder i how i did without it! I need to get my hands on a dump trailer now so i can start hauling it around and make MONEY with it. Not sure what to charge though, haha. 

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You should be able to call any bobcat dealer or even go on line to bobcat web site and give them your model # and vin # and they should be able to set you up with a genuine and correct service manual. it may cost  more than an online download but the quality will be worth it. The cost of the manual will probably be the cost of about 1 or 2 hours shop rate and the knowledge will be priceless.

A lot of them come in a hard copy or a cd style, I would prefer a hard copy if working on something that way the information is right in front of you and you don't have to keep going back and forth to a computer, but that's just a personal preferance. 

 

It looks like you got yourself a good deal thier, hope it all works out for ya :thumb1:

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You better get that fixed, that is the swash plate linkage control on top of the pump which looks to be leaking really bad already probably due to it slopping about like that. Hopefully you can get just the seal for the swash plate control rod there sometimes those are not serviced separately, this is where skid steers get spendy real quick once you need to break into the hyd system.

There are many online places to get parts for the skid steers take some time to shop around.

Here is the online Bobcat parts portal for diagrams and part numbers you can't buy from here but it allows you to see the parts break down. Been using it for the new to me Bobcat CT450 tractor I just bought last weekend.

 

https://www.bobcatpartsonline.com/#/catalogBrowser?path=%2F0000-Compact Tractors%2F0000-CT450%2F0000-ABHM11001 %26 Above W%26%2347;Cab%2F0005-Electrical System%2F0003-CAB Light Group

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I was going to look up the 763 but there are numerous serial # variations, could you post up the serial # to help me look into it. Also exactly what model # it is as they made them for many years like 763 c,f,g or h-c, h-f, or h-g series. lots of variations on that model.  

https://www.bobcat.com/historical-specs

Edited by Wild and Free

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Yeah I saw that right away when I posted the diagrams, I am in the same boat with my tractor they do not break down the pumps themselves in the diagrams, need to contact the dealer to see about this. I have a hyd pump leaking between the sections but no pump breakdown diagrams.

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