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JOHNFAK

HX35 turbine wheel

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Well I see the guy I got mine from doesn't have any listed but he still might have some. Just look up his ID and contact him. His ID is "wall5150". The shaft was very nice and was balanced and everything.

--- Update to the previous post...

To make it easy (not sure how to look people up) it's the same guy as who is selling this so you can just click his ID to pm him there. http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Holset-HX35-HX40-HY35-Turbocharger-Turbo-Rebuild-Kit_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQcategoryZ33742QQihZ008QQitemZ180618179169QQrdZ1QQsspagenameZWDVW

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I actually have no clue there. I didn't balance mine and it's fine, though they do say carbon build and housing contact happen if it's not balanced. I took mine apart again and there was no carbon and no housing contact marks from what I could tell. The turbine wheel/shaft is balanced and the compressor wheel is also balanced, therefore I see no reason for them to need to be balanced unless the compressor wheel is balanced based on a machine that matches it with the turbine or something. But if both are balanced then they will be balanced when they are together. I even asked that guy about it and he said he never did it and never had a problem either. Maybe need some more input from others on this.

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I actually have no clue there. I didn't balance mine and it's fine, though they do say carbon build and housing contact happen if it's not balanced. I took mine apart again and there was no carbon and no housing contact marks from what I could tell. The turbine wheel/shaft is balanced and the compressor wheel is also balanced, therefore I see no reason for them to need to be balanced unless the compressor wheel is balanced based on a machine that matches it with the turbine or something. But if both are balanced then they will be balanced when they are together. I even asked that guy about it and he said he never did it and never had a problem either. Maybe need some more input from others on this.

Yeah from what I am reading the individual parts are balanced but no way to ensure balanced when put back together as a component. Its a risk with something that spins 150000 rps :P But having said that - a lot of guys seem to have not too much drama with a variety of turbos' not doing the component balancing .. so :shrug: I need to check prices locally ...... have heard from $25-$100 for balancing alone. :P

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I actually have no clue there. I didn't balance mine and it's fine, though they do say carbon build and housing contact happen if it's not balanced. I took mine apart again and there was no carbon and no housing contact marks from what I could tell. The turbine wheel/shaft is balanced and the compressor wheel is also balanced, therefore I see no reason for them to need to be balanced unless the compressor wheel is balanced based on a machine that matches it with the turbine or something. But if both are balanced then they will be balanced when they are together. I even asked that guy about it and he said he never did it and never had a problem either.

Maybe need some more input from others on this.

ISX, what I made red is not exactly true. Component balance does not always equate to assembly balance. The thing is that nothing is ever completely in balance, it will always be out of balance. Perhaps by only 1,000 of a grain or less but never perfect. Something that is out of balance may be acceptable at 50,000 rpm but not at 75,000. When a turbine shaft and compressor are balanced together the imbalance can be compensated for by grinding on the assembly nut on either end of the assembly. I don't know what the imbalance specs are that are acceptable are but I do know that the imbalance harmonic vibration changes throughout the rpm range.

Yes many people do get away without balancing after replacing one of the two rotating components but there are also quite a few who don't. The HX35/40 I bought new failed after 12,000 miles because the compressor contacted the housing. This unit was supposedly component and assembly balanced, but I really don't believe it was done properly. I sent it back and after haggling with them a bit they repaired it under warranty. They replaced the bearings and thrust washer and rebalanced the assembly again, and I can see where they ground on the nut to re-balance it again. They sent my old bearings back to show they replaced them. I havn't put it back on the truck yet and am running the HX35.

John, If you get a new or used compressor I would highly recommend having the assembly balanced and then mark it when you take it apart so you can reassemble it in the same position.

An assembly that is out of balance specifications will wear the bearings out and you wont get the proper performance from it from the start. You may not notice the imbalance until it fails. Mine failed on a trip to Montana and I was able to baby it to my destination. luckily I had thought to throw the old one in a box and put it in the bed of the truck, but it's no fun to change one out on a trip. When it started to fail it wouldn't build proper boost and finally sounded like a hand full of gravel in a 3 lb coffee can when you swirl it around. Had I been pushing high boost I believe it could have come apart.

Just my advice.

Jim

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ISX, what I made red is not exactly true. Component balance does not always equate to assembly balance. The thing is that nothing is ever completely in balance, it will always be out of balance. Perhaps by only 1,000 of a grain or less but never perfect. Something that is out of balance may be acceptable at 50,000 rpm but not at 75,000. When a turbine shaft and compressor are balanced together the imbalance can be compensated for by grinding on the assembly nut on either end of the assembly. I don't know what the imbalance specs are that are acceptable are but I do know that the imbalance harmonic vibration changes throughout the rpm range. Yes many people do get away without balancing after replacing one of the two rotating components but there are also quite a few who don't. The HX35/40 I bought new failed after 12,000 miles because the compressor contacted the housing. This unit was supposedly component and assembly balanced, but I really don't believe it was done properly. I sent it back and after haggling with them a bit they repaired it under warranty. They replaced the bearings and thrust washer and rebalanced the assembly again, and I can see where they ground on the nut to re-balance it again. They sent my old bearings back to show they replaced them. I havn't put it back on the truck yet and am running the HX35. John, If you get a new or used compressor I would highly recommend having the assembly balanced and then mark it when you take it apart so you can reassemble it in the same position. An assembly that is out of balance specifications will wear the bearings out and you wont get the proper performance from it from the start. You may not notice the imbalance until it fails. Mine failed on a trip to Montana and I was able to baby it to my destination. luckily I had thought to throw the old one in a box and put it in the bed of the truck, but it's no fun to change one out on a trip. When it started to fail it wouldn't build proper boost and finally sounded like a hand full of gravel in a 3 lb coffee can when you swirl it around. Had I been pushing high boost I believe it could have come apart. Just my advice. Jim

I have been thinking of that ever since John mentioned it after my post. I can see where a balanced compressor wheel can be imbalanced on the shaft if it isn't seated the same as in the balancing machine, which it surely won't be. I do find the compressor wheel to be so light (aluminum) that any imbalance in it wouldn't matter, I mean the shaft and turbine are all steel and very heavy in comparison. But I am probably wrong there too. I haven't had any issues but I suppose the "be safe than sorry" option would be to balance it. Thanks for pointing that out SASQCH. I throw what I know out there until proven wrong, which you constantly do to me lol but thats how I learn :thumb1:

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I get many referals to Chris at engineered Diesel. Seems most guys say he is the best at turbos and sells parts for any turbo at a more reasonable price than anywhere else. He repairs others turbos ect. Most on Comp D love this guy but alll say he can be hard to get in touch with as they are swamped with work load. He is supposed to be great to deal with technically and will take the time to explain and walk you through doi it yourself turbo repairs also. http://engineereddiesel.com/

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