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I've been getting code 0336, crankshaft position sensor, lately so I changed the sensor tonight. Still the same problem. Under heavy acceleration the tach bounces around and the :cel: comes on. When I'm towing a heavy load the tach will stay at zero long enough that the engine defuels some. To me it seems to be related to the extra vibration caused by the increased power. Any ideas what I should look for next?

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Hmmm... Unplug the ECM and the Crank sensor plug and test the wiring between the two plugs should be 5 ohms or less. Double check the connector too be sure the contacts inside are not all wore out and getting a good grip on the pins of the crank sensor. Remember without the crank sensor showing RPM's there is no alternator charge...

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check for ground and +5vdc on the connector as well both of these are supplied directly from the ECM, the wire in the middle I believe is the sensor input lead so you wont get anything back from that. well you shouldn't anyways.

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I'll try these things but the problem I'm seeing with it is that everything works normal till I really root on the throttle. Did some testing on the way home from work today and it does it on power levels 2-5 on the Comp. On power level 1 and stock it won't do it. As for the connector at the cks it looked like new when I was under there last night. I put a bunch of dielectric grease in the connection before installing too.

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I'll try these things but the problem I'm seeing with it is that everything works normal till I really root on the throttle. Did some testing on the way home from work today and it does it on power levels 2-5 on the Comp. On power level 1 and stock it won't do it. As for the connector at the cks it looked like new when I was under there last night. I put a bunch of dielectric grease in the connection before installing too.

after you get it to wig out does it continue until you shut the truck off? or does it stop doing it when you let off the throttle? in either case I am thinking broken wiring or bad ECM because thats all thats left since you replaced your sensor.

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after you get it to wig out does it continue until you shut the truck off? or does it stop doing it when you let off the throttle? in either case I am thinking broken wiring or bad ECM because thats all thats left since you replaced your sensor.

It stops as soon as I let off on the throttle.

--- Update to the previous post...

Where can I find a wiring diagram for this? I looked in the downloads but couldn't find what I needed.

--- Update to the previous post...

Ok I tested the voltage at the sensor. 4.73 volts when grounding through the connector but 4.97 volts when ground the volt meter right to the ground on the battery. Could I be getting a poor ground to/through the ECM? If so how and where does it get its ground?

--- Update to the previous post...

Is there nobody reading on here today? I could sure use some input if someone has some.

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Well I'm here but hiding in the back room of the server writing caching scripts...

The best I can say is the master ground on the driver side feeds the ECM.

Posted Image

So pull the ECM connector and the Crank sensor connector and check ground lead and the 5V wires for OHM's anything over 5 ohms is a fail.

You had meantion the offset of ground voltage anf the 0.2 or greater is a fail so back track the grounds. ECM ground is feed by the G115 lead back to the driver side cable.

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Ok I checked the grounds where the diagram says the ecm grounds to. Found some pretty ugly connections there so fixed that all up and still the problem persists. I even went to my friends place and tried his Comp on my truck to see if it was to blame in any way (because the problem only shows itself on levels 2-5) but it acted the same way. Any more ideas, aside from changing the ecm:clap:?

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Ok lets get some fresh information on the table... Whats the error codes if any that are present? :shrug:

Always p0336. Just now I had a p1690 but haven't had time to look it up. Was in the shop tinkering with it again and now I got it to throw the codes with the Comp off. First time it's ever done that.

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Always p0336. Just now I had a p1690 but haven't had time to look it up. Was in the shop tinkering with it again and now I got it to throw the codes with the Comp off. First time it's ever done that.

New reading material...

http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/2629-P1690-Fuel-Injection-Pump-CKP-Sensor-Does-Not-Agree-With-ECM-CKP-Sensor

P1690 - Fuel Injection Pump CKP Sensor Does Not Agree With ECM CKP Sensor

Problem in fuel sync signal. Possible injection pump timing problem. Low power, engine derated, or engine stops.

Monitor & Set Conditions

Fuel Injection Pump Crankshaft Position (CKP) circuit is monitored when ignition is on and engine is running.

DTC may be stored when no signal exists within specified window parameters with no Camshaft Position

(CMP) sensor or CKP DTCs present.

NOTE: Fuel transfer pump may be referred to as lift pump or fuel lift pump.

Possible Causes

[*]AC Noise Across Fuel Transfer Pump

[*]Other DTCs Present

[*]Wiring & Connectors

[*]Fuel Injection Pump Static Timing

[*]Fuel Sync Signal Circuit Open

[*]Fuel Sync Signal Circuit Short To Ground

[*]ECM

Testing

1. Measure AC noise to ECM by connecting DVOM between ground and terminals No. 48 and 50

(Red/White wires) at ECM harness connector. If AC voltage is 25 mV rms or less, go to next step. If AC

voltage is greater than 25 mV rms, replace fuel transfer pump. See appropriate REMOVAL,

OVERHAUL & INSTALLATION article.

2. Turn ignition on with engine off. Using DRBIII® scan tool, check for DTCs. If no additional DTCs

exist, go to next step. If any additional DTCs exist, repair other DTCs first. See DIAGNOSTIC

TROUBLE CODE DEFINITIONS .

3. Using scan tool, check Good Trip Counter for DTC P1690. If Good Trip Counter for DTC P1690 is

displayed and equal to zero, go to next step. If Good Trip Counter for DTC P1690 is displayed and not

equal to zero, go to step 5 .

4. Turn ignition off. Disconnect FPCM harness connector. FPCM harness connector is located on end of

fuel injection pump. Check for poor connection/terminal contact at FPCM harness connector. Repair as

necessary. Disconnect ECM harness connector. ECM is located on driver's side of engine, just in front of

fuel transfer pump and contains a 50-pin connector. Check for poor connection/terminal contact at ECM

harness connector. Repair as necessary. Using DVOM, measure resistance of Dark Green wire between

terminal No. 8 on FPCM harness connector and terminal No. 18 on ECM harness connector. If resistance

is less than 5 ohms, go to step 7 . If resistance is 5 ohms or greater, repair open in Dark Green wire

between FPCM and ECM.

5. Turn ignition off. At this time, conditions required for DTC to be stored are not present. Inspect wiring

and connectors between FPCM and ECM. FPCM is located on top of fuel injection pump. ECM is

located on driver's side of engine, just in front of fuel transfer pump and contains a 50-pin connector. If

no problems exist, go to next step. If any problems exist, repair wiring or connectors as necessary.

6. Check fuel injection pump timing. See CHECKING FUEL INJECTION PUMP TIMING under FUEL

INJECTION PUMP TIMING in ON-VEHICLE ADJUSTMENTS - RAM PICKUP - DIESEL article. If

fuel injection pump timing is okay, go to next step. If fuel injection pump timing requires adjustment,

adjust fuel injection pump timing as necessary.

7. Ensure ignition is off. Disconnect FPCM harness connector. FPCM harness connector is located on end

of fuel injection pump. Disconnect ECM harness connector. ECM is located on driver's side of engine,

just in front of fuel transfer pump and contains a 50-pin connector. Using DVOM, measure resistance

between ground and terminal No. 8 (Dark Green wire) on FPCM harness connector. If resistance is 5

ohms or greater, replace and program ECM. See appropriate REMOVAL, OVERHAUL &

INSTALLATION article. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair short to ground in Dark Green wire

between FPCM and ECM.

--- Update to the previous post...

Also check your Alternator for bad diodes... :smart:

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New reading material...

http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/2629-P1690-Fuel-Injection-Pump-CKP-Sensor-Does-Not-Agree-With-ECM-CKP-Sensor

P1690 - Fuel Injection Pump CKP Sensor Does Not Agree With ECM CKP Sensor

Problem in fuel sync signal. Possible injection pump timing problem. Low power, engine derated, or engine stops.

Monitor & Set Conditions

Fuel Injection Pump Crankshaft Position (CKP) circuit is monitored when ignition is on and engine is running.

DTC may be stored when no signal exists within specified window parameters with no Camshaft Position

(CMP) sensor or CKP DTCs present.

Possible Causes

[*]AC Noise Across Fuel Transfer Pump

[*]Other DTCs Present

[*]Wiring & Connectors

[*]Fuel Injection Pump Static Timing

[*]Fuel Sync Signal Circuit Open

[*]Fuel Sync Signal Circuit Short To Ground

[*]ECM

Testing

1. Measure AC noise to ECM by connecting DVOM between ground and terminals No. 48 and 50

(Red/White wires) at ECM harness connector. If AC voltage is 25 mV rms or less, go to next step. If AC

voltage is greater than 25 mV rms, replace fuel transfer pump. See appropriate REMOVAL,

OVERHAUL & INSTALLATION article.

I have the Airdog so I didn't think this would be my problem

2. Turn ignition on with engine off. Using DRBIII® scan tool, check for DTCs. If no additional DTCs

exist, go to next step. If any additional DTCs exist, repair other DTCs first. See DIAGNOSTIC

TROUBLE CODE DEFINITIONS .

My scangauge and the key trick didn't show any new codes.

3. Using scan tool, check Good Trip Counter for DTC P1690. If Good Trip Counter for DTC P1690 is

displayed and equal to zero, go to next step. If Good Trip Counter for DTC P1690 is displayed and not

equal to zero, go to step 5 .

Wasn't able to do this test. Don't even know what it is.

4. Turn ignition off. Disconnect FPCM harness connector. FPCM harness connector is located on end of

fuel injection pump. Check for poor connection/terminal contact at FPCM harness connector. Repair as

necessary. Disconnect ECM harness connector. ECM is located on driver's side of engine, just in front of

fuel transfer pump and contains a 50-pin connector. Check for poor connection/terminal contact at ECM

harness connector. Repair as necessary. Using DVOM, measure resistance of Dark Green wire between

terminal No. 8 on FPCM harness connector and terminal No. 18 on ECM harness connector. If resistance

is less than 5 ohms, go to step 7 . If resistance is 5 ohms or greater, repair open in Dark Green wire

between FPCM and ECM.

0.8 ohms on this test.

5. Turn ignition off. At this time, conditions required for DTC to be stored are not present. Inspect wiring

and connectors between FPCM and ECM. FPCM is located on top of fuel injection pump. ECM is

located on driver's side of engine, just in front of fuel transfer pump and contains a 50-pin connector. If

no problems exist, go to next step. If any problems exist, repair wiring or connectors as necessary.

No visible problems here.

6. Check fuel injection pump timing. See CHECKING FUEL INJECTION PUMP TIMING under FUEL

INJECTION PUMP TIMING in ON-VEHICLE ADJUSTMENTS - RAM PICKUP - DIESEL article. If

fuel injection pump timing is okay, go to next step. If fuel injection pump timing requires adjustment,

adjust fuel injection pump timing as necessary.

Didn't do anything here.

7. Ensure ignition is off. Disconnect FPCM harness connector. FPCM harness connector is located on end

of fuel injection pump. Disconnect ECM harness connector. ECM is located on driver's side of engine,

just in front of fuel transfer pump and contains a 50-pin connector. Using DVOM, measure resistance

between ground and terminal No. 8 (Dark Green wire) on FPCM harness connector. If resistance is 5

ohms or greater, replace and program ECM. See appropriate REMOVAL, OVERHAUL &

INSTALLATION article. If resistance is less than 5 ohms, repair short to ground in Dark Green wire

between FPCM and ECM.

DVOM didn't show anything on this test (numbers didn't change at all) Does that mean there is or there isn't resistance? This ohms business really gets going in circles in my head.

--- Update to the previous post...

Also check your Alternator for bad diodes... :smart:

Didn't check into this but will do on Monday

Answers in red. As I said this ohms stuff gets to me so out of desperation I ran a new wire from #18 at ecm to #8 at pump. No change so I guess the original wire must've still been ok.

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#7 was to check to see if the wire was shorting to ground somewhere... Since the Ohm meter showed infinite (OL sometimes). This means the wire was good. Something is going on between the Crank sensor and the VP44 sensor they are not agreeing... :shrug: You might end up finding a dealer and let them drop a DRBIII tool on it and see if the RPM signals are good from Crank and VP44...

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Also check your Alternator for bad diodes... :smart:

Moparman you are awesome! I didn't believe this could be the problem but on a hunch I took the power wire off the alternator. Immediatlely the goofy little hop that had been going on occasionally quit so I took the old girl out for a spin. I really rooted on er quite a few times and no tach jumping or :cel:. I drove back in the shop and put the wire back on the alternator, instantly it gave it's little hop. I stepped on the throttle and the tach was jumping again. Boy am I going to sleep good tonight:hyper::thanks:

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Well I weighed the odds of fixing my old alternator or getting a new one and decided on the new one because it comes with a 2 year warranty. Well it didn't charge so I put the old one back on and it doesn't charge now either but it did when I took it off. Am I still looking at ECM problems?

--- Update to the previous post...

Any ideas for me out there?

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PCM... The one on the passenger firewall is the one that controls the field... What you need to do is find out of if the blue wire has power and the green should be ground. If the crank sensor is not working right (tach) then the alternator will not charge. How about the alternator fuse in the PDC...??? There is a patch for ya... http://mopar.mopar1973man.com/cummins/general/voltage-reg/voltage-reg.htm

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PCM... The one on the passenger firewall is the one that controls the field... What you need to do is find out of if the blue wire has power and the green should be ground. If the crank sensor is not working right (tach) then the alternator will not charge.

Yes the blue has power, same voltage as the battery, and the green is ground.

--- Update to the previous post...

How about the alternator fuse in the PDC...???

This was the problem:doh: I wasn't aware that there was a fuse like this.

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It stops as soon as I let off on the throttle.

--- Update to the previous post...

Where can I find a wiring diagram for this? I looked in the downloads but couldn't find what I needed.

--- Update to the previous post...

Ok I tested the voltage at the sensor. 4.73 volts when grounding through the connector but 4.97 volts when ground the volt meter right to the ground on the battery. Could I be getting a poor ground to/through the ECM? If so how and where does it get its ground?

--- Update to the previous post...

Is there nobody reading on here today? I could sure use some input if someone has some.

My truck has been doing this same thing for the pass couple years. Mine will do it with my box and without and is off and on issue. Took it to cummins NW because dealership where i live well to be nice is retarded. I know more about the cummins then there tech does. Long story short my truck is defueling under heavy load aka foot on the floor. Computer is reading no more boost so it cuts the fuel. I had to get a boost fuller and little elbow. That what solved my issue.

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