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Hey guys, I noticed that there is no place for a biodiesel runner. Does anyone here run biodiesel or have thoughts on it? When I can catch up on money and get the time to do it, I plan on getting myself setup with an operation to refine it.Just wondering if anyone else is interested.. :shrug:

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Your fine where you at... :thumbup2: As for biodiesel I'm a bit leary of it... :whistle:

Hmm? :shrug: Whatchu talkin' bout willis! Mmmm... well I have done a large amount of research on the subject and have not nearly reached a point to call myself smart on the subject, but the whole idea of paying only about $1 a gallon turns me on! :lmao: MPGs can go right out the winder for all I care... I devised a clever little system that would allow me to obtain good flows during cold weather. Which is why it seems alot of people steer away from it.
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AHA! :tongue: Now I know! I may be able to agree with the 1st thread, but not so much with the 2nd. Only because that persons practice in refining is in question. ATSM standards is what should be followed for fuel quality, and I sense this did not meet that standard. I also realize that not every diesel can run biodiesel. Not that their engine can handle it, but because of the fuel delivery method. I'm not familiar with those CR systems. Only got acquainted with the p7100 and intimate with the VP44. I'm confident in being able to run bio through the VP44 with the tricks I have up my sleeve! That p7100 seems like it can handle anything you throw at it... As for emissions, performance, I'm not worried much. I may lose mpg's and energy output, but what I get back is more dough in the pocket in the long run. I'm not interested in getting biodiesel from people who grow the canola in the fields, but from restaurants that have already used it for cooking. Just keeping a recycling type of mindset. The fastest diesel on the drag strip uses biodiesel. :thumbup2:http://www.cumminsracing.com/
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Biodiesel has a very high cetane which is definitely needed for the fastest diesels because there isn't much time for the diesel to burn, high cetane means it lights up faster, it doesn't have time to mess around. Personally, I think biodiesel is fine, but I drive a 12V so I would probably say anything that runs that is filtered really good is fine lol. Especially since it's cheaper!

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Yeah I know its a extreme side of the biodiesel story I know those kind of failure are rare for station bought biodiesel but as for homebrew diesel its still very possible to opps on.. So I typical post up the thread to let people know it not something to take lightly about. If you going to make your own biodiesel make sure to get a game plan and stick to it don't cut corners on your production. Maybe I mis-understood you orignal post as for producing your own Biodiesel. :shrug:But as for purchasing B2 or B5 thats fine and will have little to no problems with it.

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I would say I really goofed when I bought my truck. It definitely helped me get my hands dirty in the diesel world, but now that I know what the heck I'm doing (somewhat), I regret buying my truck! Its great truck, but with what I had planned, its not the right one...I can still do what I want with it as I had planned for the other intended type, but it just will never fit my bill. Unless I wanna make it a money pit and still have it never reach my potential, I need to re-figure my priorities before I get into trouble with the wifey!In my neck of the woods, the gas stations do not offer a biodiesel blended fuel. I doubt I will see anything like that for a while too. Actually, not to argue with you, but I would say that homebrewers either are just as good if not better at making quality biodiesel than the big boys. I have read horror stories on both sides. Thats why I intend to do it myself! After seeing what the possible carnage can be, I have definitely promised myself to never cut corners. As that can lead to some expensive repairs!

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Rip at source asked me 1 question about my core vp before i sent it in. Did you run bio-diesel ?Just for fun maybe call him and pick his brain. They rebuild them from what i understand. Maybe he thinks they are hard on the vp's ? I have never run it in my truck. I too like the price of it.What system are you going to buy ? Stacy david (gears) showed a system maybe 5 years ago it looked simple to make. Good luck with it. Share what you buy and tell us how it works. Maybe i'll join ya.

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I think he asks that question because alot of people have not gained an awareness of how strict they need to be in refining theirs to overcome these problems that arise from low quality refinement.There are numerous things to take into account when it comes to using biodiesel. Little is needed to run it in a diesel engine and our trucks specifically. Some may think that refining it is much more work than it is worth, but that is to each their own.At the moment, I have not had a chance to brainstorm a setup. I have been more focused on the cause and effect of using it and how to overcome the problems using it in our VP44 IP's.I believe I have a solution to it, but the other question that comes to mind from it is whether or not the parts are made or are going to be relatively inexpensive to make. The method is simple in how it works, however.IF I was going to go with a home made design, I would have to say that the Appleseed holds alot of merit with me... Some disagree, but eh... :shrug:

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The biggest problems is the filtering of the final fuel and drying the fuel after washing. Most people end up with way too much water in the fuel or still got glycerin in the fuel. So if you filter it well before using and allow it to separate out the water then you should be good.

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You are correct! Glycerin is not the a huge problem to some of the others mentioned. Water is a big killer in the process.I have seen that centrifuging is one of the best ways to approach filtration. Although, other filter methods when done right can achieve filtration of less than one micron. Thats alot cleaner than what our diesel filters filter out!It seems to me that a quality batch of homebrew diesel along the lines of 50 gallons or so takes about a week to refine. With the washing and drying taking the longest. There are plenty of tests that can be administered to check fuel quality and also any left over chemicals from the process or unprocessed.My concern has been over the idea of Coking, polymerization, and creation of peroxides. Other things I have been considering is salt content and pH.

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I recently got on CF to see the latest action and decided that I would post this up when I passed by it. Figure it may shed some light on the subject for someone else. http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/alternative-fuels-additives-oils-lubricants/449420-vp44-bio.html I may actually be in need of some help with an idea I have. As I do not really have the knowledge on the specific subject.

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