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Missing Flight 270


JAG1

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Hope this isn't a silly question, but, is it possible to fly a 777 out into orbit?

 

What happens if you just let it climb as high as it can go? Wouldn't it get lost in space?

 

Hope you guys don't beat me up too bad on this one :sofa: but, a news search shows nothing along those lines being talked about.

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:)

 

Planes are dictated by many things. One of them is air... A plane cannot fly without air. What do I mean? You need oxygen for the engines to burn fuel to propel the plane. You also most importantly need air to be able to create lift for the plane. Either one lacks air, you get a stall...

 

Not to mention, a 777 is nowhere near capable of being to maintain anything of itself in space if it were possible for it to go into space!

 

Spacecraft use fuel that has oxidizers to allow it to burn the fuel in outer space. Nozzles are used to create the thrust. You need an oxygen supply to breathe in space as well. I highly doubt a 777 is sealed well enough to overcome the vacuum of space enough to not explosively decompress...

 

I have another idea, why don't you consider this:

 

http://www.prisonplanet.com/alex-jones-on-possible-hijacking-of-malaysia-airliner.html

 

http://www.prisonplanet.com/rep-rogers-government-investigating-terrorism-and-national-security-in-missing-flight.html

 

http://www.prisonplanet.com/flight-370-passengers-may-still-be-alive-pirated-boeing-777-may-return-to-skies-as-stealth-nuclear-weapon.html

 

http://www.prisonplanet.com/finally-a-plausible-scenario-of-what-happened-to-flight-370.html

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Thanks Anthony, I kinda knew this idea would get shot down. :nadkick:

 

I also think it landed on the ocean, not broken up and then allowed to sink .

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The latest reports are that the engine data system was turned off first, some time before the last radio check in call.  After the call, the radar transponder was turned off and then the plane changed course..  These are deliberate acts.  Even though the engine data system was turned off, the satellite still pinged it getting a response for several additional hours which it would not have if it was crashed (although it might f it had landed somewhere).  The satellites weren't intended for direction finding but triangulating satellites can still give some location data.  Who ever was flying the plane had pilot skills but apparently didn't know the engine system still answered pings when shut off.   

 

Radar is Radio waves, going out & returning.  Radio waves are line of sight pretty much (though could bounces are an exception but random & unpredictable).  Low waves bend more than High like VHF.  Due to the curvature of the earth, live of sight is broken.  At ground level it might be 5 miles...  but every foot of elevation adds a mile of range if you have the power.  This is why boats & ships locate antennas as high as practical. 

 

It appears this airplane descended to get below radar range & charged a course away from land & possible receivers.  Being a night flight, satellites probably did not see much.  Maybe thermal scans?  Do they do that?   

 

This is very mystifying...  if only because I fail to see the motivation.  This is costing a whole lot of countries a whole lot of money. 

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The report I read stated they flew too low for the airlines to be able to track them with their radar, but the military was still able to track it for a while.

I too wonder the motive, they are saying piracy but if that were the case you would think the demands would have started long ago. Logic says she is sitting on the sea floor somewhere.

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Hope this isn't a silly question, but, is it possible to fly a 777 out into orbit?

 

What happens if you just let it climb as high as it can go? Wouldn't it get lost in space?

 

Hope you guys don't beat me up too bad on this one :sofa: but, a news search shows nothing along those lines being talked about.

 

So I typed in 777 max altitude on google and 3rd result down is what you want http://www.askcaptainlim.com/-air-safety-aviation-35/129-what-limits-a-plane-to-fly-higher-than-the-normal-cruising-altitude.html

 

Not sure what you searched for haha

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That article actually did a very nice job of explaining why airliners fly at certain altitudes and how the jets work.

 

Everyone is starting to lean towards foul play with the lost airliner now. Actually they are specifically looking toward the pilot/copilot. They have determined that the scheduled flight path was changed before the plane even took off. In this particular plane the pilot can change the flight plan in the computer but really only a pilot would know how. Someone deliberately changed the flight plan in the 'puter but there isnt really any way to figure out what it was changed to. Not sure how that works but it isnt looking good for the flight crew.

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They didn't explain much about wing loading and stuff though, so I will as I think it is another important factor.  

 

Wing loading is the loaded weight of the aircraft divided by the area of the wing, measured in lbs per sq.ft..   Its much the same as the size of ski you need in order to ski behind a boat on water.  For a given set of skis, the speed you need to get up on top of the water depends on the weight of the person, same with airplane wings.  But you see 2 factors there...speed and area.  With enough of one, you can compensate for the other.  Meaning with more speed, a fat person can still get on top of the water, conversely with enough area, you can get the same person on top of the water with a slower speed.  The water has more area of the ski to push on so it has more of an effect so you need lower speed.  

 

A kite has a very very low wing load...so it doesnt take much wind to lift it.  So this should all be very obvious stuff now.

 

So we move on to the factor of air density.  If the water was very thin, how easily would it be to get the skier on top?  Think of trying to get on top of something that almost resembles air....  Those tiny skies will get you nowhere unless you realllllllllllly go fast...or, increase the ski size (a lot) until you are on top of the thin "air" water substancy crap that I just made up.  The same thing happens when you go higher in the atmosphere.  You can either go faster, or use bigger wings.  The U2 (this thing) flys at 70-80k feet, at only 500mph..  It is almost impossible and is said to be comparable to balancing a bowling ball on a needle.  Because of the slow speed, the thin air means they have to go with plan B, big wings and low weight to allow for very low wing loading.  The whole thing only weighs 14,000lbs unloaded.  This makes it almost impossible to land, it wants to fly like a kite.  I think they said landing it was where most trainees failed.  

On the flip side you have the SR71 (this thing) which flys at the very same 70-80k feet, but at 2200mph.  They chose speed over wing area to get the same altitude..  The wing loading is high so it has to go pretty fast to take off.  In fact, the boeing that refuels it has to slightly nosedive to keep up enough speed while refueling the st71.  

 

Hope this helps.  

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