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guesswho512

turbo diesel register's oil analysis

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That is truely amazing that after that testing to find out Synthetic oil did not hold up as good as there touted. :stuned:

Even to find out some of the cheap stuff like Chevron Delo rated higher on the scale than most Synthetics... Truely amazing stuff. I always wonder about the Wally world stuff and funny to see it middle ground. But now knowing the Napa line is good and Chevron Delo is good stuff I know where I'm buying my oils now...:smart:

Okay, now that Robert also put some pricing information in the table, I can draw a few additional conclusions. For example, look at the two Cummins/Valvoline oils I placed in my “Best” category. The mineral oil version costs less than half of the synthetic version; yet they both deliver equivalent performance. Do you really need that synthetic oil? I doubt it.

While we’re at it, look at oils 18 and 20. These are goods oils, but are they really worth 100 and 200% more than their competitors because they are produced by “racing oil companies?” I doubt it. What can racing oil companies possibly know that diesel engine builders and oil companies don’t already know?

Thank you for the information!

Now this confirm what Dorkweed is doing now and still going...

http://forum.mopar1973man.com/showthread.php/1688-80-000-Miles......No-Full-Oil-Change

Saving Money... :spend:

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This info is all worth less and a waste of time in my book as it is nothing but new oil specs, I work with oil labs info every day and there is no real info from oil that has been used and wear specs, the list would go on for as long as that worthless article just listing testing that should be done for true tests.This should not be a sticky as it is useless info that will misguide people.You can look at specs of anything new on this world all you want and speculate but until it has been tested in the real world and sent to a lab for analysis then why waste your time on an article like this.Funny how what they list as #1 in both tests is the oil that Cat and Cummins and other major manufacturers came out publicaly several years back and told customers not to use because it did not meet the specifications of their oil needs and it was a poor quality oil, they have since improved their quality but from oil lab techs input at a class I had a few weeks ago it is still not a highly thought of oil from what they see in the sample results.

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They did a blind test on those oils, so I highly doubt it was biased. As for the Valvoline Blue not being highly thought of, if Cummins has spent thousands of hours helping develop and testing a product and stands behind it, its good enough for me :shrug:

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This info is all worth less and a waste of time in my book as it is nothing but new oil specs, I work with oil labs info every day and there is no real info from oil that has been used and wear specs, the list would go on for as long as that worthless article just listing testing that should be done for true tests.

So what's your suggestion, then?
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They did a blind test on those oils, so I highly doubt it was biased. As for the Valvoline Blue not being highly thought of, if Cummins has spent thousands of hours helping develop and testing a product and stands behind it, its good enough for me :shrug:

They did a blind test of nothing but additives in new oil from what I read into it and no wear testing which is what an oil is truely judged by. also I was referring to the Shell Rotella oil that was rated #1 and was dissed by the big diesel engine manufactures, Valvoline was #4 on their list.

So what's your suggestion, then?

Look at companies that do testing based on what oils are scored on as far as ball bearing test and a few other tests, When I get time I will try to find results of a wear test of oil, Amsoil does this. Spend some time digging into their site and you will find these test results. Here is a very simple write up but it gives a better picture of the kind of tests I am talking about. There are better write ups with actual pictures of the components and more scientific info for those inquiring minds if you have time to look it up, I have to head to work now. http://www.synthetic-oil-tech.com/d.cgi/1506490/api_comparative_motor_oil_testing.htm Also talk to oil analysis labs and if they are willing to talk candidly you will find out what they see as far as oil quality over time based on what they see for wear metals and oxidation, acid levels ect ect ect.

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Also talk to oil analysis labs and if they are willing to talk candidly you will find out what they see as far as oil quality over time based on what they see for wear metals and oxidation, acid levels ect ect ect.

I'm sorry, I had the impression you were in that field, I was hoping for your opinion. Agreed that real tests are far more valuable than stats on new out of the bottle oil alone.

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We take the samples, I fill out hundreds of them every month and I review the sample results to determine actions for manitenance on the info we get back from the analysis reports.I am involved with every step except for the actual testing but on occasion have communications with the lab folks.

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They did a blind test of nothing but additives in new oil from what I read into it and no wear testing which is what an oil is truely judged by. also I was referring to the Shell Rotella oil that was rated #1 and was dissed by the big diesel engine manufactures, Valvoline was #4 on their list

I hear what your saying but also keep in mind that John Martin was an engineer at Lubrizol for many years. Lubrizol makes many of the additives that are found in todays oils. While I dont know John personally, I have been in the plant in one of Lubrizols plants in nearby Painesville, OH many times over the years installing various boilers and piping systems and I can tell you theyve got quite the facility to test the products they make. Im guessing the reason he can claim which oils are benificial and which ones arent is because he is very familiar with all the additives found in oils. He is making his observations once he determines which additives are in each brand because hes already spent countless hours and years determining which additive provides the most wear protection, which is the best detergent, etc etc. Now Ill be the first to admit, I know nothing about oil other than what I have read over the years. But personally knowing a little bit of the companies background, I would consider this a pretty good source of information. Just my opinion, no disrespect meant

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