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Bacon Creek Metal

Hello

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My name is Scott, I have a problem......

 

I am addicted to my 2 Cummins trucks....

 

I have a ‘71 F250 that I swapped a ‘94 Cummins and 47rh into and I love it. 

 

My bride has a ‘96 3500 47re that I have a love/hate relationship with. When the Diodes aren’t fried in the alternator and it shifts correctly I love it. I just finished deleting the CAD axle shaft and put locking hubs on it. 

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 a pick up truck always looks cooler  :thumbup2: with firewood in it.

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I've got the diodes in my basement. Just gotta grab one and stuff it in the small flat rate box. 

 

Make sure to check your diode and be sure of the BATT+ terminal design. I've got the one that is straight out the back not out the side. 

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So I dig into the harness across the front of the engine again to move the battery lead to the passenger side battery. That looks fine. 

The ground lead attaches to the front of the head under the radiator hose. The ground leads that come up from the driver’s side attach to the top of the head by the heater grid leads. The only ground that goes to the passenger side is for the AC compressor. Do I leave it this way or should I run it’s ground to the passenger side battery? I know electronics typically signal through the ground, so would this mess me up?

image.jpg

image.jpg

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Might show ignorance here but here goes. Does WTs ground mod apply to 12v trucks??? It would appear if this is stock for a 12v someone else already new this was better.

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Probably true. I left the ground stuff alone.   I need to get a solder gun, my trusty HF unit smoked and popped today. I wasn’t able to get the smashed ground joints fixed properly. What a joke. I can’t believe Dodge did that. 

The high voltage TPS code is gone now with the positive lead removed from the harness and hooked to the other battery. Now I need to put my non-adjustable TPS back on and get the new diodes in. 

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17 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

I typically just use a propane torch to do heavy gauge wire work soldering. 

do you place the wire in the bench vice to help not melt the insulation? That way its held in place anyway. Then just heat the lug while holding it on the wire holding the solder on the wire till it flows, is that right right? 

 

T.I.A.

Edited by JAG1

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4 minutes ago, JAG1 said:

do you place the wire in the bench vice to help not melt the insulation?

 

No. I do it all right on the engine. Way too many years of solder work. I've gotten good using just plain old propane torch and roll of solder. No vise. No heatsinks. Heat up, apply solder move on. @JAG1 just like a plumber would with copper pipe.

 

Heated and soldered on the vehicle.

DSCF4423.JPG

 

Heated and soldered on the vehicle. Look at the intercooler pipe you can see where it got heated. Grey spot.

DSCF4427.JPG

 

Secret... Automotive wiring is design to tolerate much more heat of the engine and normal operation. This allows for using the propane torch and solder. The trick is to place your lug and the heat only the lug not the wire. Apply your solder and the solder will naturally wick up in the copper.

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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Need to look at your local electric shops and see what they can get you. Like myself, I can get all kind of harness covering. I'll just go catch up with my harness builder for my High Idle Kits. 

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Mike are you crimping those before you solder?

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1 minute ago, JAG1 said:

Mike are you crimping those before you solder?

 

No. Just tight fit and then solder them to the wire. Much better than crimping. Good flow of solder through the middle and completely welded together.

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I used MAP gas on the 2/0 and lugs. Heats up quick but it will melt the wire insulation if you are not careful.

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1 minute ago, Bacon Creek Metal said:

Mike, you make those high idle kits at the house?

 

Not really. @Me78569 does my solder work. Then I've got a harness company in Caldwell, ID that builds the cables. I just assemble the parts in a bag. Pack a box and mail it.

 

2 minutes ago, Bacon Creek Metal said:

I need to come visit you, I bet you’re fun to BS with

 

Well like most know. TTS (Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday) I'm on the road. Like I'm on my weekend (Sunday and Monday). 

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