Jump to content
  • Welcome Guest To Mopar1973Man.Com

    We are a Dodge Ram Cummins Turbo Diesel Site. We are very friendly and helpful group of Dodge Cummins owners. We try to keep your truck running the best we can and provide information for diagnostics, repairs and even guide you on the best replacement parts to use.

     

    Registration is free. Registering on the site will provide access to many more things like...
     

    • Contribute to the Forum being able to ask questions and get support for your Dodge Ram Cummins.
    • Contribute to Article Database adding your ideas and suggestions.
    • Classified Ads posted by the members
    • Member Garage where you can display your vehicles and modifications.
    • Download Files, documents, and tunes for your truck.
    • 911 Support Network. We've got a group of members will to aid you if your truck breaks down on the road.

Recommended Posts

Good thought on the pulley size didn't even consider that, I was leaning towards Nations so at this point I'm just going to order from them and see what I get.

I kinda thought this would not fix the dimming headlight issue but we can still hope right :thumb1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

oops wrong thread, delete

 

 

.

Edited by GSP7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finally I got all the parts in including the new alternator just waiting for temperatures closer to 0 and not double digits below.  Or I could just take the lumber rack off and get it into the garage otherwise it's too tall...:doh:  Finally we should see double digit positive temperatures tommorow and Monday :cheers:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alright so it's been a while since I posted last I was able to get it done about 4 days ago but haven't been able to post anything due to injuring  my hand during the repair. 

I will have more to follow including pictures and so on right now as it sits Larry B's cable repair kit was far less complete that I was hoping and needed a lot of pieces to complete the project also I'm not exactly happy with the quality of terminals they didn't seem to take solder very well.

The alternator on the other hand is a complete different story I could not be any happier during first startup you'll still will notice the headlights dim but once the truck runs for a minute it adjusts itself and you will notice a slight dimming if all of the lights are on in the cab including interior lights and your running fan on high power otherwise the headlights almost never dim like before.

For the alternator you do have to add one ground and charge line, also my grounds for the engine were upgraded as well.

I'm putting a list of extras I had to buy to complete the project so you will know what is involved, as well as some locations tricks and things I found of what not to do....

all total 2 new batteries, new alternator, all new battery cables and new body chassis grounds under the hood were replaced.  I had to run to the store once to get the rest of the parts that took 3 hours without that the job can be easily completed in half a day I spent about 6 and a half hours at it but had extra wiring and modifications I made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, WiscoRedkneck said:

haven't been able to post anything due to injuring  my hand during the repair. 

 

What happened? Are you ok?

 

36 minutes ago, WiscoRedkneck said:

I will have more to follow including pictures and so on

 

I'm curious of the project and what you've done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The drill press vise separated from the press deck when enlarging the lugs I got hit by the spinning vise I didn't break any bones just cut pretty good and bruised sucks it's the dominant hand....

 

IMG_20180107_110210408.jpg

IMG_20180107_110144654.jpg

IMG_20180107_114434427.jpg

Okay so the first two pictures are what I had to start with the other pictures show removal of the crossover wire and the driver side ground. the ground is the drivers side engine ground it goes down to engine block I believe it's an 18mm bolt that is into the block right behind your slobber tube just below the power steering pump.  The picture below shows the lugs the new ones I got are 2/0 3/8s lugs as you can see the engine grounds and starter lugs have to be 2/0 1/2 on the engine and starter side of the cables I just drilled three out of which one ended in disaster....

Since we're on the topic the Larry B kit I got was designed as a top end kit if you're cutting off your existing cable lines and putting on new cables ends to the batteries it works great but if you're replacing the cables in their entirety you need a lot more lugs about 12 if I recall correctly and all total including enlarged chassis to battery ground and extra charge line and ground I used 40' of 2/0 Nations alternator gave me a fancy wire chart I will post for reference to identify what gauge wire I should use for the system...

 

The next picture shows the location of the passenger side ground both batteries at this point have been removed the air intake tube, air cleaner and heat shield has also been removed to grant easier access I traced the main ground on passenger side back to the engine it's located just behind the oil filter housing slightly below it and just in front of the engine mount I was able to touch it from up top but found it easier to remove from underneath.  This battery side also has a body ground, the PCM ground(I think) and I believe it's the grid heater ground that's the last picture of the gray plug, those plugs are very difficult to get apart and should be inspected for corrosion and even though they have a weather pack on them I still put a little Dielectric grease in there just for good measure.

Luckily for me when I separated them and then cut off the existing terminal end to splice on my new one the wire was still in good shape and it was not going to need to be replaced, if it's too badly corroded and you have to replace it you'll have to contact a Dodge dealer and acquire a new plug end or find something online.

 

IMG_20180107_122152444.jpg

IMG_20180107_114332406.jpg

IMG_20180107_114400896.jpg

The alternator has also been removed from the truck at this point I pretty much had everything out of the truck I was ready to start cleaning and rebuilding.  I laid out all the existing battery cables on the floor then cut all my new ones to length once I was done with that I then trim the ends to expose the copper to prepare them for crimping and soldering. 

 

I need to take some more pictures of final product this picture here is the last picture I took before I injured my hand, at this point both batteries are sitting in the truck the alternator is in loosely for mock up and we're dry fitting all of the cables currently the truck does not have the right wire loom on the crossover cable it's too small once my hand feels a little better I have to change that so when you see that the pictures no comments please lol I'll make you guys chuckle I've been using voice to text to bring this write up to you and editing with my left hand when needed....   Still -6 degrees outside right now so maybe around noon I'll go out and take some pictures for you guys. :thumb1:

 

IMG_20180107_162522301.jpg

Edited by WiscoRedkneck

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's good job your doing and I thank you for writing about it.

 

I'm sorry about your hand. I know how it goes sometimes being in construction...... It hurts like a son of a 'B'  and then the cold makes it 10 times worse.

 

Are you going to solder the lugs after crimping them on? I always think about how I might melt the cable insulation with too much heat and then also read about soldering the ends of the cables before crimping the new lugs on.

 

What is best?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, I say solder is the best method being the cable is in sense welded to the entire face of the lug. Where crimping is based on contact by pressure. If soldered properly the cable will be sealed to moisture and battery acid where crimping the cable can oxidize from battery acid contact or simply water. 

 

@JAG1 For a construction guy, it's like sweating together to copper fittings they never leak, do they? As long as it was done right. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Personally, I say solder is the best method being the cable is in sense welded to the entire face of the lug. Where crimping is based on contact by pressure. If soldered properly the cable will be sealed to moisture and battery acid where crimping the cable can oxidize from battery acid contact or simply water. 

 

@JAG1

I agree with this one hundred percent the only exception to this is in my case the LarryB style tinned terminal ends did not accept solder very well, I believe I couldn't get it hot enough without causing damage to the insulation to get the terminal to accept solder it just kept wicking up the copper.

so do to being short I purchased locally some copper ends that were crimped and soldered theese took solder very well so it truly depends on what you are working with

IMG_20180114_101624855_HDR.jpg

IMG_20180114_101631173_HDR.jpg

IMG_20180114_101643767_HDR.jpg

The first picture here is of the upgraded chassis ground that goes directly from the frame to the battery then you have the upgraded charge line and ground wire off the alternator bracket to the negative on the passenger side battery and then off the power stud on the alternator to the positive the passenger side battery ran out of red cable so the passenger side charge line is black:doh:

Last picture just gives you a little better shot of the alternator and the back of it

IMG_20180114_101609346.jpg

IMG_20180114_101656517_HDR.jpg

IMG_20180114_101714432_HDR.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice job.

 

You know you could make a kit and sell them on this site.

Edited by JAG1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice. The only thing I would do is find a high amp fuse holder and install a 180 Amp fuse or whatever the Alternator is rated for. This way the alternator is protected if a diode happens to short out then the fuse will blow and not start an engine fire. 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMG_20180114_133149024.jpg

Screenshot_20180114-154118.png

That there is the fusible link that I plan to use to protect the charge line to the battery 200 amp any thoughts before I order it up

Edited by WiscoRedkneck
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

New fusible link assembly will arrive tomorrow, ran the numbers looked everything over all total not including batteries and alternator I have $243 in wiring fusible link and terminal ends. After looking into it I could probably build a kit for under 300 that's including wiring and fusible link for a upgraded alternator.  If I recall correctly it was just under $300 to the door for the alternator and $270 for batteries

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I soldered mine. Soldered a couple of the oe cables a while back and never noticed any wicking up the cable. I heated the lugs and melted the solder into them. Then heated the wire and put the heat back to the lug and assembled them, took away the heat and let them cool. 

 I did the same with the new welding cable and experienced wicking. Y'all correct me if I am wrong here, but the solder should not wick unless the wire is hot enough to allow it to flow. Just wondering if the finer wire is transmitting the heat better up the wire?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Typically I would dip the copper ends in flux and heat them a little bit to get the flux to flow into the strains of copper. The brush some flux into the copper lug and heat. Then start adding the solder to the lug and dip the cable into the lug and heat for a few seconds longer on the lug this should get the solder to start wicking up the cable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes it was expensive but considering the transmission hunting is fixed I'd say the alternator actually was bad even though it didn't show on meter, now I have an extra deep cycle battery going back into the camper since I stole it when one of two batteries went bad awhile back.   Before this repair I new the remaining old battery was questionable and I was advised to match batteries so I did.

The battery cables well there could have been a cheeper repair but I would have only considered that a band aid as I did have pretty bad voltage drop through the starter cable and terminal ends.

So about 200 dollar upgrade the rest was needed unfortunately... 

But in the long run totally worth it no questions asked.  :thumb1:

9 minutes ago, dripley said:

I soldered mine. Soldered a couple of the oe cables a while back and never noticed any wicking up the cable. I heated the lugs and melted the solder into them. Then heated the wire and put the heat back to the lug and assembled them, took away the heat and let them cool. 

 I did the same with the new welding cable and experienced wicking. Y'all correct me if I am wrong here, but the solder should not wick unless the wire is hot enough to allow it to flow. Just wondering if the finer wire is transmitting the heat better up the wire?

That's almost exactly what I noticed the fine wire was absorbing the heat far better than the terminal end

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know what you mean being the amount of money I dropped in lighting for the front of the Cummins. I've got a total of $1,000 dollar in lighting sounds expensive but well worth as well. So I really do understand what you are saying in money well spent. :thumb1:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Typically I would dip the copper ends in flux and heat them a little bit to get the flux to flow into the strains of copper. The brush some flux into the copper lug and heat. Then start adding the solder to the lug and dip the cable into the lug and heat for a few seconds longer on the lug this should get the solder to start wicking up the cable.

That is pretty much what I did and I used flux also. Never had a problem with melting the insulation. Probably did a little on the inside but was un noticeable on the outside.

Edited by dripley

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little over 200 bucks is what I had invested in building my own cables, I sourced all my parts from the local Napa and didn’t cheap out on quality parts.

 

As far as the mating the cable to the lugs, soldering is my only method, I use pure lead solder and brush on flux. On larger lugs I normally stick them in a vise and flux and fill them about 3/4 full of solder then stick the already tinned  cable end into the soldered terminal  and push the cable all the way in until the insulation butts right up to the lug. When cooled I like to dab a little liquid tape on the end before I heat shrink, 

 

@WiscoRedkneck make sure you keep those new terminals and post lightly coated with oil, that will keep them corrosion free and looking new.  :thumb1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@01cummins4ever I've recently started using a product called fluid film it's a lanolin based lubricant/ corrosion protection since it's good enough for the Navy and the first item on recommend uses is battery connections I figured it must be be perfect..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Nice. The only thing I would do is find a high amp fuse holder and install a 180 Amp fuse or whatever the Alternator is rated for. This way the alternator is protected if a diode happens to short out then the fuse will blow and not start an engine fire. 

 

Are the stock alts and wiring like that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, notlimah said:

 

Are the stock alts and wiring like that?

 

Yes, there is a 120 amp fuse in the PDC for the alternator.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now




×