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Brent B3HH

Getting ready to tow

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Posted (edited)

Getting ready for a trip to Minnesota in June this year (1700 + mlles from home) going over I-90 /I-94. Bumper towing around 10k ( truck around 8k trailer 2k). my truck setup is a pretty stock 04, 3500. 2w, SRW, 48re, I do have a brake controller, new front brakes with drilled and slotted front rotors. No suspension bags

Little nervous bout that Idaho/ Montana 6000' climb. 

 

Any advice? Do's/ don't

Edited by Brent B3HH
Forgot to add the 2w, SRW info

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Posted (edited)

 

 

Exhaust brake is a good suggestion. Drill and slotted are prone to cracking and warping easy. I just made a post about my brake inspection 190k on my pads still over 50% life. Maybe 300k ill change them. Still got my OEM rotors.20190306_100041.jpg

 

Now climbing watch the Pyro it passes 1,100F downshift and kick the RPMs back to 2,000 and hold.

 

I do 750 to 1,000 miles a week!

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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Prone to cracking? I hadn't heard that. Guess I went that way cause it was suggested the OEM are prone to warping. 

 

Sorry, Pyro? You just spoke way over my head. :) Sounds like I need a gauge for that. (Truck is stock) 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
7 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

Prone to cracking?

 

Prone to failure, period. The spacer is known to fail because they are not made to hold the massive torque of a Cummins. Maybe a 1/2 ton Chevy gasser. Then with the larger and wider wheel, the leverage forces tend to break the spacers.

 

Be careful also a lot of people got for the cool factor but end up screwing up the final ratio of the axles. These axles are typically 3.55 gears with 35-inch tires that ratio drops to 3.21 and makes to much strain on the driveline. Like myself, I dropped to a 30-inch tire and change the ratio to 3.69 and one of the quickest trucks around. If you want to go up in tire size you need 4.10 axles. The optimal ratio is 3.55 to 3.73.

 

7 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

Sorry, Pyro? You just spoke way over my head. :) Sounds like I need a gauge for that. (Truck is stock) 

 

Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) or Pyrometer is to measure the exhaust gases to hopefully prevent you from melting pistons. I found out in stock form the Dodge Cummins can produce over 1,400*F temperatures and aluminum pistons melt at 1,281*F roughly. There is other factors like oil cooler and oil jet that keep them cool but extended period you can still melt those pistons. 

 

If you towing you 4 four gauges. 

  1. Boost Pressure
  2. Pyrometer
  3. Fuel Pressure
  4. Transmission Temperature

I suggest ISSPro EV2 gauges which are electric and are USB programmable. They come with a warning light which you can program and alert you to problems or getting out of range. The nice part is I don't even have to look at the gauge the position of the light from the corner of my eye tells me if it boost, fuel pressure, EGT's or trans temp. No more staring at the gauge climbing grades or watching like a hawk all the time. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man
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On ‎3‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 9:17 AM, Brent B3HH said:

 Bumper towing around 10k ( truck around 8k trailer 2k).

 

A small SUV can tow that 2k trailer. Your truck won't even know it is there. Take your trip and relax, you will be fine.

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Thanks Mopar1973man, a ton of great info for me.The D&S rotors on the front,"cool factor" is not my goal by any means, I was under the impression they dissipated the heat better.

in a world of upgrading everything, I wouldn't have thought the OEM would have been the way to go. ... guess i'll have to revisit that.

 

6 hours ago, NIsaacs said:

 

A small SUV can tow that 2k trailer. Your truck won't even know it is there. Take your trip and relax, you will be fine.

thanks, I appreciate that. just a little bigger hill than the last 2 tows I did with the 94 (2wd, 5 speed, 360) up the Siskiyou's.

towing.JPG.ca768ddb20057e75a33f247d25fffae0.JPG

that's one reason I bought the 04....

suppose i'll just stay to the right and relax :)

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Slow down a little. You blew the paint right off that 94 :lmao:. You'll do just fine with the 04. It will be quite a difference.... in a good way.

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25 minutes ago, dave110 said:

Slow down a little. You blew the paint right off that 94 :lmao:. You'll do just fine with the 04. It will be quite a difference.... in a good way.

LOL, yeah on another forum a guy said the paint was "appealing"

 

 

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38 minutes ago, dave110 said:

Slow down a little. You blew the paint right off that 94 :lmao:. You'll do just fine with the 04. It will be quite a difference.... in a good way.

 

I agree. If the op can haul that flatbed truck with a gasser, he don't need any help with do's and don'ts, he has it handled. 

 

OP, I hauled this load out of Clay Center, Kansas, 2148 miles round trip. I got 14.6 mpg over with empty trailer and 10.6 on the return. These old Dodge trucks get'er done.

 

 

0320171328_Burst01.jpg

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5 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

Thanks Mopar1973man, a ton of great info for me.The D&S rotors on the front,"cool factor" is not my goal by any means, I was under the impression they dissipated the heat better.

 

Not really, they more prone to warping and cracking. The solid OEM rotors are way better than any of the slotted and drilled rotors. More metal and thicker structure to hold up to heating and cooling cycles better. Oh, the other trick is to use economy brake pads with the lowest amount of metallics. This will prevent it from eating the rotors. Stay away from ceramic brake pads they will eat the rotors before the brake pads. 

 

An exhaust brake is highly suggested for people that tow. 

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On 3/9/2019 at 8:17 AM, Brent B3HH said:

Getting ready for a trip to Minnesota in June this year (1700 + mlles from home) going over I-90 /I-94. Bumper towing around 10k ( truck around 8k trailer 2k). my truck setup is a pretty stock 04, 3500. 2w, SRW, 48re, I do have a brake controller, new front brakes with drilled and slotted front rotors. No suspension bags

Little nervous bout that Idaho/ Montana 6000' climb. 

 

Any advice? Do's/ don't

 

If the motor is stock then just drive it smart. That’s it. An exhaust brake would be very handy, but if towing isn’t a common thing then the cost may not be worth it. 

 

You dont need any gauges for that trip. People do it all day every day and just drive their trucks. 

 

Make sure the fuel filter meets the proper specs (OEM or Baldwin are all I’d run). 

 

Have a clean air filter.

 

Thats it. That’s an easy trailer to tow. The Idaho and Montana mountains aren’t that bad. Slow down a little, drop it out of OD and enjoy the scenery. 

 

16 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

 

Prone to failure, period. The spacer is known to fail because they are not made to hold the massive torque of a Cummins. Maybe a 1/2 ton Chevy gasser. Then with the larger and wider wheel, the leverage forces tend to break the spacers.

 

What spacers?

 

16 hours ago, Mopar1973Man said:

Exhaust Gas Temperature (EGT) or Pyrometer is to measure the exhaust gases to hopefully prevent you from melting pistons. I found out in stock form the Dodge Cummins can produce over 1,400*F temperatures and aluminum pistons melt at 1,281*F roughly. There is other factors like oil cooler and oil jet that keep them cool but extended period you can still melt those pistons. 

 

If you towing you 4 four gauges. 

  1. Boost Pressure
  2. Pyrometer
  3. Fuel Pressure
  4. Transmission Temperature

I suggest ISSPro EV2 gauges which are electric and are USB programmable. They come with a warning light which you can program and alert you to problems or getting out of range. The nice part is I don't even have to look at the gauge the position of the light from the corner of my eye tells me if it boost, fuel pressure, EGT's or trans temp. No more staring at the gauge climbing grades or watching like a hawk all the time. 

 

If you think cylinder temps and EGT’s are the same then think again. Pistons are exposed to temps well above the EGT.  

 

Piston temps and EGT’s have way too many variables to have a direct correlation. A stock 04 will have higher EGT’s and lower piston temps than a 02, and the same thing for an 02 vs a 97. So nothing to worry about being at 1400° on the EGT’s if the tuning is stock. 

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On 3/12/2019 at 12:36 AM, Brent B3HH said:

Prone to cracking? I hadn't heard that. Guess I went that way cause it was suggested the OEM are prone to warping. 

 

Sorry, Pyro? You just spoke way over my head. :) Sounds like I need a gauge for that. (Truck is stock) 

 

 

 

Drilled and slotted are not good for heavy braking, they easily get overwhelmed.

 

I second the exhaust brake go with a pacbrake if you have a stock auto. Their brake controllers are far superior to that of the BD. I should also mention if its an option get the larger compressor and larger tank, so if you need to fill tires up its easier then molassas.

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thinking about a test tow this coming Wednesday, towing a shorter distance (700miles to California) j a little heaver truck (around 10k) over an overall smaller incline..... going HWY 101 less than 2000', coming back I-5 and the Siskiyou's @ around 4300' 

1024049858_3500tow.jpg.31c344bf6a26da0ac0dd311ff5a762d6.jpg

I changed the oil and air filter.

thinking i'll take it slow and rest the truck often. trying to get more comfortable for the longer tow in June

 

owners manual says to let the truck idle after towing, before shut down...... Really? does anyone do this religiously?     

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1 hour ago, Brent B3HH said:

1024049858_3500tow.jpg.31c344bf6a26da0ac0dd311ff5a762d6.jpg

 

owners manual says to let the truck idle after towing, before shut down...... Really? does anyone do this religiously?     

I’ve been doing it Religiously since my dodge was new and every diesel truck I drive, even if not towing. Always a good idea to let turbo cool down and allow cooler oil to flow through at idle.

If you have a pyro gauge (exhaust gas temp) letting it cool down to 315 degree’s is good for the turbo, and pro long it’s life, just a good habit to get into 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, 01cummins4ever said:

If you have a pyro gauge (exhaust gas temp) letting it cool down to 315 degree’s is good for the turbo, and pro long it’s life, just a good habit to get into 

 

Automatically handled with a Quadzilla tuner for the 2nd gen set the temp you want it keeps the truck running till the temperature is hit. Then it shuts down the engine for you. You can turn the ignition off and lock the truck and just walk away. I've got my Quadzilla set for 275*F.

 

I wish the Smarty Touch for the CR engines had a cooldown timer. Sadly, it does not. 

Edited by Mopar1973Man

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2 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

owners manual says to let the truck idle after towing, before shut down...... Really? does anyone do this religiously?     

 

Every turbo charged engine. Weather on my personal rig, or the freightliners at work. I'll idle it as long as needed to hit 250f. If I'm towing heavy 10,000 or more I've found it takes upwards of 5 to 8 mins of idling to get the exhaust and the turbo to cool down. 

 

If it's less then 3 mins I leave it idle. 

 

A cheap trick I learned to help cool it down is to downshift and let the engine free rev. It runs nice cool air thought the combustion chamber, the exhaust manifold and the turbo charger. It makes a big difference. 

 

Despite this added info it's best to let it idle down. Shot your truck off and expect a 150f rise in temps. As long as your under your engine oil coking temper your good. But that's in the mid 400s anyways. 

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7 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

thinking about a test tow this coming Wednesday,  a little heaver truck (around 10k) 

 

What are you going to use for a trailer? The one pictured appears to be a 7k GVW, too small for a 10k load.

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, NIsaacs said:

 

What are you going to use for a trailer? The one pictured appears to be a 7k GVW, too small for a 10k load.

yeah, in the above photo, I think the load "dwarfs" the trailer. it is actually a 14k

880037009_trailer2.jpg.9f2ae34e4a0cd9eb41f172e9163c55e4.jpg

 

Trailer.JPG.7b341fb745fee0733072692423735996.JPG

  

Glad I asked about the "cool down". Looks like I will need to make a conscious effort in planning my fuel and restroom stops

Edited by Brent B3HH

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13 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

owners manual says to let the truck idle after towing, before shut down...... Really? does anyone do this religiously?     

 

Very religiously... even around town driving gets a little turbo cool down time. 

 

 

On my 05 I had a pre and post turbo and the biggest thing I noticed with those was that the pre temps could look cool, but the post said otherwise. It just meant that I let it idle a little longer. 

 

The turbo and oil will thank you for letting them cool down. 

21 minutes ago, Brent B3HH said:

Glad I asked about the "cool down". Looks like I will need to make a conscious effort in planning my fuel and restroom stops

 

I generally don't shut down for restroom stops, just let it idle and lock it with the keyfob. 

 

Same normally goes for refuel stops while towing. 

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3 hours ago, Brent B3HH said:

yeah, in the above photo, I think the load "dwarfs" the trailer. it is actually a 14

 

Yup, nice trailer, my bad, :doh:

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