• Announcements

    • Mopar1973Man

      Quadzilla Tunes   06/12/2017

      QUADZILLA TUNE REPOSITORY - There is now a Quadzilla tune download area. When you submit a tune file to the download area it will automatically create a forum topic that allows discussion of your tune. So export your tune and upload it to the site. Then we all can help out in building better tunes. Check it out gang...
    • Mopar1973Man

      911 Support Group   06/22/2017

      Hey Gang, I've got the 911 support group database back up and running once again. It's listed in the 911 support category. It will allow members to list their contact information and location so other have a listed of members to call upon in the time of need. So if you wish to support other member please stop by and add your listing into the database. https://mopar1973man.com/cummins/911-support.html/contacts/

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ISX

Nevermind..

15 posts in this topic

Look at this crap. No wonder the VP melts down. Diesel has no heat transfer at all. Maybe with some extreme temperature differences it would take some of the heat, but if it hardly changes at 1/16" over an ice cube then really, it is completely worthless. It wouldn't even melt the ice, the water on the bottom was because the diesel wouldn't transfer any heat into the ice. I know it works on the engine like the bottom of the pistons but there is a big temperature difference. I don't think the VP is getting to 1000F so I doubt the diesel is going to be taking much heat away from it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not so sure of that theory, the ice cube floats in water and sinks in diesel. Convection current moves the temps through the water as the warm water rises up to the ice cube, but with the ice and water at the bottom, it would take a long time for the ice to conduct through a dissimilar liquid. Especially if you have to make heat go down to get cooled by the ice. It goes against the laws of physics. Maybe you should try and run both liquids through a coil with a pump for a specified time? Maybe put the coil in an ice bath? I know from refrigeration water has a specific heat of 1. :smart:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You've got a point. I will have to find a coil. Hmm, so in theory if I put the jar in the fridge, the diesel and water should cool at the same rate?

--- Update to the previous post...

Well crap I thought I was onto something. I threw the whole jar into a pitcher of icewater and the whole thing cooled at the same rate. Diesel was a little slower to cool but hardly. I think I am going to stick a fuel temp gauge in my truck one of these days and see what happens.

Thanks for getting me back in line Flman! :thumbup2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's food for thought ISX..............a flowing liquid will cool an object faster than just immersing said object in the liquid. Same thing goes for "air"........hence, we have "wind chill"!!! When I train my dog in hot weather I'm always looking for heat stress. If that's happens, they say to keep pouring water over the dog, or put him in flowing water. It's all about heat transfer gradients. The greater the difference in temps between two objects, the faster the heat/cold transfer. Doesn't matter if it's biological tissue or iron or aluminum etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You've got a point. I will have to find a coil. Hmm, so in theory if I put the jar in the fridge, the diesel and water should cool at the same rate?

--- Update to the previous post...

Well crap I thought I was onto something. I threw the whole jar into a pitcher of icewater and the whole thing cooled at the same rate. Diesel was a little slower to cool but hardly. I think I am going to stick a fuel temp gauge in my truck one of these days and see what happens.

Thanks for getting me back in line Flman! :thumbup2:

Its Elementary Watson! :lmao2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's food for thought ISX..............a flowing liquid will cool an object faster than just immersing said object in the liquid. Same thing goes for "air"........hence, we have "wind chill"!!! When I train my dog in hot weather I'm always looking for heat stress. If that's happens, they say to keep pouring water over the dog, or put him in flowing water. It's all about heat transfer gradients. The greater the difference in temps between two objects, the faster the heat/cold transfer. Doesn't matter if it's biological tissue or iron or aluminum etc.

I thought about that but the original test as you saw showed no heat transfer at all. But Flman was right about the different liquids and everything. If I had a diesel ice cube it would probably chill the diesel. I am still kinda baffled by the whole thing. Maybe I will wrap my head around it one of these days. Even you just said the greater the difference in gradients the more heat transfer, which I understand that, but when an ice cube is freezing, and the diesel is 70F, why wouldn't it cool the diesel. I think it was melting the cube but the water slid down it and into the bottom. But I still don't understand why the diesel 1/16" away showed no signs of being cooled.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The molecular structure won't pass between the two, because they reject each other.the other thing to note, is, that the 1" or so of water in the bottom of the diesel jar got very cool, very rapidly (down in the low 60s within a minute), thereby slowing the melting speed of the ice. The sheer volume of 70+*F water in the other container (being of same base molecular structure) melts the ice cube much more rapidly, only due to the total volume of warmer water.And, of course as stated before, the cooler temperatures fall downward, due to molecular weight, and the warmer temps stay higher in the container.I think if you did the same test, with reversed values in the diesel jar (1" fuel, the rest with water), you'd see much different results.Still, this kinda stuff fascinates me, regardless :)Science FTW.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree. I love this kinda stuff.

What it makes me do is consider winter time and how the fuel reacts to the cold as well as if there is water in the fuel (rare to never for me). But it still makes me think and wonder a bit more... Thanks everyone! :thumbup2:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We all learned one thing!If you want to protect your ice cubes store them in diesel fuel!:tongue:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We all learned one thing! If you want to protect your ice cubes store them in diesel fuel!:tongue:

LMFAO!

What it makes me do is consider winter time and how the fuel reacts to the cold as well as if there is water in the fuel (rare to never for me). But it still makes me think and wonder a bit more... Thanks everyone! :thumbup2:

Yes sir! I'd like to see a test with the jar of diesel placed in an icebath; a big bowl full of ice, with the jar nestled down in the ice (use the glass jar as the temperature conductor, rather than the ice cube, itself.. I'd do it, but I don't have a nice Fluke w/thermocouple, anymore (thanks to my 5y.o. daughter...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LMFAO! Yes sir! I'd like to see a test with the jar of diesel placed in an icebath; a big bowl full of ice, with the jar nestled down in the ice (use the glass jar as the temperature conductor, rather than the ice cube, itself.. I'd do it, but I don't have a nice Fluke w/thermocouple, anymore (thanks to my 5y.o. daughter...)

I did that test.. Threw the whole jar in a pitcher of ice after thinking of what Flman had said. Sure enough the diesel/water cooled at the same rate. It just baffles me how it won't touch the ice cube. I really don't know what to think of it. Just seems so far fetched, although it is obviously true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's food for thought ISX..............a flowing liquid will cool an object faster than just immersing said object in the liquid. Same thing goes for "air"........hence, we have "wind chill"!!!

When I train my dog in hot weather I'm always looking for heat stress. If that's happens, they say to keep pouring water over the dog, or put him in flowing water. It's all about heat transfer gradients. The greater the difference in temps between two objects, the faster the heat/cold transfer. Doesn't matter if it's biological tissue or iron or aluminum etc.

True, but once the inanimate object reaches the actual air temperature the amount of air flow does not make it any colder. It just causes any temp difference to balance quicker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's food for thought ISX..............a flowing liquid will cool an object faster than just immersing said object in the liquid. Same thing goes for "air"........hence, we have "wind chill"!!!

When I train my dog in hot weather I'm always looking for heat stress. If that's happens, they say to keep pouring water over the dog, or put him in flowing water. It's all about heat transfer gradients. The greater the difference in temps between two objects, the faster the heat/cold transfer. Doesn't matter if it's biological tissue or iron or aluminum etc.

It may cool faster but it will not cool it below it's temp.

Air or a fluid flowing over a thermometer will drop the temp faster but not below the ambient temp or the temp of the fluid no matter how fast or slowly it travels.

Wind chill has no effect on an inanimate object, like your truck if it did your outsidetemp woul fall the faster you went.

1. What is wind chill temperature?

A. The wind chill temperature is how cold people and animals feel when outside. Windchill is based on the rate of heat loss from exposed skin caused by wind and cold. As the wind increases, it draws heat from the body, driving down skin temperature and eventually the internal body temperature. Therefore, the wind makes it FEEL much colder. If the temperature is 0 degrees Fahrenheit and the wind is blowing at 15 mph, the wind chill is -19 degrees Fahrenheit. At this wind chill temperature, exposed skin can freeze in 30 minutes.

This is because our skin is covered with water/ moisture it is the evaporation of this moisture that makes it "feel" colder when it really isn't..

2. Can wind chill impact my car's radiator or exposed water pipe?

A. The only effect wind chill has on inanimate objects, such as car radiators and water pipes, is to shorten the amount of time for the object to cool. The inanimate object will not cool below the actual air temperature. For example, if the temperature outside is -5 degrees Fahrenheit and the wind chill temperature is -31 degrees Fahrenheit, then your car's radiator will not drop lower than -5 degrees Fahrenheit.

/om/windchill/windchillglossary.shtml

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites