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kennygss

Bio-Fuel

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kennygss

I have a local company that supplies Bio Diesel, can I run this in my 02? I was thinking about running some tanks, just to compare performance and economy etc. I know nothing about Bio Fuels.

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04dodge

should be able to with know problem. if it is federaly tested probalby only 5% to 10% bio.I run 50% to 75% all the time in an o4 logged 40000 or more miles no problems. run it in three different dodges 95,01,04.so far so good.

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Dave3500

Bio fuel is supposed to be the best lubricant & a natural cleaner. From what I've read the B20 combination is supposed to be the best for performance. After that point, above B20, the BTU's per gallon drop off. In the summer, guys run it 100% Biodiesel w/ no problems as long as it is fuel grade quality. The amounts that you are running are supposed to be good year round. I don't have any access to local bio fuel but with EPA requirements some states are now or will be requiring small amounts B2, B5 to be in regular D#2. Much like ethanol is now in gasoline. There is talk about bio fuel to be on the same status as E85 flex fuel according to BIodieselmagazine for EPA regulations/emission standards.You are actually doing something good for your fuel system & going a little greener. Should significantly help the precious vp44!Run it like you own it,Dave :thumbsup

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Mopar1973Man

Funny... The fuel station around here are now starting to post sticker and signs saying "No Ethanol!" LOL Other that that most are marking the pump with the the amount of Ethanol being used... I hope it follows the same sceme with diesel fuel...

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guesswho512

i don't know if its true but i read somewhere on one the cummins forums i read said that europe mandates a small % of blend. they went on to say most diesel here as a small blend so that they don't have to have do anything if they export.don't know how true it is. personally i don't by it, but i have no idea.

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dracozny

i don't know if its true but i read somewhere on one the cummins forums i read said that europe mandates a small % of blend. they went on to say most diesel here as a small blend so that they don't have to have do anything if they export. don't know how true it is. personally i don't by it, but i have no idea.

here in Oregon its mandatory B2, up in the Portland area I think the city mandates B5. we also have a fueling company that started here that sells B99, the thing is the bio sold at the pump is more expensive because they are using mostly soy crops with only a small % of it recycled. and the even funnier part of that is bio like ethanol has less BTU's per gallon. so although it makes for great lube and cleaner it doesn't make good on the efficiency side of things.

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Wild and Free

Last Coal Mine I worked at did a couple year experiment with bio blends in its heavy equiment fleets and found that the best fuel economy and performance overall came with the 5% bio blends. This places average daily usage was 35,000 gallons of fuel a day.

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Mopar1973Man

here in Oregon its mandatory B2, up in the Portland area I think the city mandates B5. we also have a fueling company that started here that sells B99, the thing is the bio sold at the pump is more expensive because they are using mostly soy crops with only a small % of it recycled.

and the even funnier part of that is bio like ethanol has less BTU's per gallon. so although it makes for great lube and cleaner it doesn't make good on the efficiency side of things.

This is simple to see... Now the truth is high the cetane the lower the BTU's so Bio having a natural high cetane index (mostly caused from the methanol).

http://forum.mopar1973man.com/picture.php?albumid=3&pictureid=224

As cetane levels go up in the winter time here so does the BTU value go down hence why the MPG fall here about 2-3 MPG in the winter time.

http://forum.mopar1973man.com/picture.php?albumid=3&pictureid=225

Point of reference is that Unleaded gasoline is roughly 125K BTU's (Boy high cetane fuel doesn't look good now does it???) :wow:

Just for even more fun I found that racing unleaded fuel has a Gravity API of 50...

http://www.osbornauto.com/racing/unleaded.htm

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MoparFreak1988

Bio blends are bad news in my opinion unless you blend it yourself and/or use extensive filters to control water saturation, be carefull in the winter do to the high chance of gelling and line freezing, long story short my boss was running a 2004 dodge ram 3500 with the cummins with a 50 percent blend and was changing fuel filters and everything like he should and at 50,000 he lost the injection pump, the pump was not replaced under warrenty and had to come out of pocket simply because fuel comtamination was deemed the cause if i can find the picture of the pump pulled apart i will gladly post them tho dont get your hopes up i can barely find yesterdays receipts :lol:... I'm sure that now there are filters that can combat this saying this was a while ago and he had all stock equipment, but i just thought i'd let you guys know about a bad expierence that i witnessed and oh boy he was pissed for weeks lol hope it proves usefull and i think its a great idea it just needs to be tuned up a bit yet. If anyone has any usefull insight as for filters to use i've got the bio fuel around here and am willing to expieriment with the old motor and see what results i get

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