Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I put a temp probe in my old 47re and in my 2004 and both seem to respond pretty much the same. I pull a 8500lb toy hauler over much of the west and found that the only time my trans temp goes over 160* is when going under 30 mph pulling a hill with ambient temperature also having some effect. I've never had a reading over 195* but have heard others say theirs has gone to 220, which is the highest safe temp in my opinion. Above 220* the life of your transmission is shortened depending on how high the temp gets and for how long. Others more knowledgable than me will probably chime in and that's good but that is my opinion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I am in city traffic I will see 160*. Cruising the highway, I am at 130*. My temp is read at the outlet port of the tranny. Seems like I have read on here that having the temp read at the pan is not that desirable. Can't remember the exact reason though. Someone else will correct me if I am wrong! Regardless, you are monitoring the temp so that is a plus for the life of the tranny!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I wish folks would research things before doing things. This thread will explain. http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/1135-Installing-Tranny-temp-gauge?highlight=sensor The oil in the pan is the coldest oil in the system as it has just returned from the cooler circuit. If you are seeing 200+* in the pan you are close to having a deep fried tranny. I found the pan temps to be 50-70* cooler than the converter outlet port on average when I had a gauge in both spots at once while testing.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave Goerends told me that with ATF+4 (synthetic) 200* in the pan would be the highest you would want to see, but normally won't hurt much. Obviously the cooler the better, but I trust what Dave G told me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If I am in city traffic I will see 160*. Cruising the highway, I am at 130*. My temp is read at the outlet port of the tranny. Seems like I have read on here that having the temp read at the pan is not that desirable. Can't remember the exact reason though. Someone else will correct me if I am wrong! Regardless, you are monitoring the temp so that is a plus for the life of the tranny!

I have mine in the same spot and see the same temps.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Read the info in your link - thanks! Took the part number to Rock Auto & found a Dorman replacement (DORMAN Part # 624352) for $17.08. http://www.rockauto.com/dbphp/prt,42,624352 Any more details on how to remove the redundant check valve? Which one is more reliable; the one in the cooler or the one in the replacement hose? Hope this helps, Joe in St Louis

I wish folks would research things before doing things. This thread will explain. http://forum.mopar1973man.com/threads/1135-Installing-Tranny-temp-gauge?highlight=sensor The oil in the pan is the coldest oil in the system as it has just returned from the cooler circuit. If you are seeing 200+* in the pan you are close to having a deep fried tranny. I found the pan temps to be 50-70* cooler than the converter outlet port on average when I had a gauge in both spots at once while testing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

Read the info in your link - thanks! Took the part number to Rock Auto & found a Dorman replacement (DORMAN Part # 624352) for $17.08. http://www.rockauto.com/dbphp/prt,42,624352 Any more details on how to remove the redundant check valve? Which one is more reliable; the one in the cooler or the one in the replacement hose? Hope this helps, Joe in St Louis

Take the one out of the new line. It is just a hard rubber ball and will pop out if you get behind it with a small screw driver or o-ring pick.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...