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E or D rated tires.


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seems the BFG at's are both rated at 3195. one at 80 psi one at 65.

why not run the D  rated? they hold the same load. what am i missing.?

i know when loaded with my 5er i don't see tire squish even only at 65 PSI. i did air up to 80 but felt i didn't need to.

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part numbers Tire Size, Load Index & Speed Rating MSRP $

(PER TIRE) 37130 LT285/70R17/D 121 R $315 25105 LT285/70R17/E 121 R $328

OE Code Sidewall Rim Width Range (Min/Max) Section Width on Measuring Rim Width Overall Diameter revs/mi Tread Depth (in 32nds) Max Load, Single

(lb @ PSI) Max Load, Dual

(lb @ PSI) Tire Weight DC BSW 7.5" - 9" 11.5" on 8.5" 32.8 635 16 3195@65 2910@65 55.8   RWL 7.5" - 9" 11.5" on 8.5" 32.8 635 16 3195@80 2910@80 58.6

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I got 85K out of a set of BF ats and sold them to a buddy who got another 25K out of them and sold that rig with the same tires on it. They were D rated 285-75-16's on my 95 ram 1500. I had them siped when new and I think that helped a lot too they saw a lot of trailer and gravel as well.

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Comes down to sidewall flex and how heavy and how often you are going to tow or haul, if it is regular you will most likely see failed sidewall or bad cords & tread separation over time with the D rated on a 2500. D rated will run hotter under load due to sidewall flex not being able to run them past 65 psi versus E rated tires at 80 psi.

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Even thou they are rated the same I wouldn't consider the LRD's. The tire store technically can't install them, thou they generally will because they carry the same rating.

The D's will run hotter and be less stable for the same load, neither of which are good when hauling/towing.

 

There is a reg, NTSB??, that keeps 17's at 3195lbs or I would think the LRE's would be higher.. some company do rate their 285's higher, but fewer than used to.

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My honest opinion is I would never run a d rated tire on a 2500 just as a safety precaution of the possibility of heavy loads for long distances.

 

1/2 ton absolutely the only choice would be d rated tires.

 

My work trailer is pretty close to the max on tires.  I keep them filled to the max/load range C........50psi.   When I need to replace them, I'm going with load range D!!!

 

JFYI!!

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I just put Gladiator ST225/75r15 load range E on the RV... NIce looking tire and seemed to have good reviews http://www.treaddepot.com/group/glst.html  Plus the price was right!! Less than 500.00 for 5 tires mounted and balanced, along with having them move my original spare to a different rim ( so 6 tires were actually mounted and balanced). I decided I wanted 2 spares for the trailer vs 1. While I had the the wheels off I checked the brake shoes and repacked the bearings.post-1978-0-15343400-1419174679_thumb.jp

post-1978-0-89330800-1419174701_thumb.jp

The bearings were definately in need of repacking!!! The front axle more so than the back (thinking the back axle or at least the spindles had been changed at some point as they have a zerk fitting and the fronts do not, also they were full of blue grease and the fronts were mostly dried up red grease)

post-1978-0-55057300-1419174720_thumb.jp

New fender skirts are being made out of fiberglass since the one got shreded with the blowout and the good one is being used for a mold :thumb1:

Edited by YabbaDoo
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Could it be the person inputting the info did a typo, one is a BLK wall tire other is RWL ?

Possible both are really a E range tire.

I don't think so, it's been that way for years. My brother had KM2s is a LRD that were 3195@60 in 285/70R17.

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I just put Gladiator ST225/75r15 load range E on the RV... NIce looking tire and seemed to have good reviews http://www.treaddepot.com/group/glst.html Plus the price was right!! Less than 500.00 for 5 tires mounted and balanced, along with having them move my original spare to a different rim ( so 6 tires were actually mounted and balanced). I decided I wanted 2 spares for the trailer vs 1. While I had the the wheels off I checked the brake shoes and repacked the bearings.attachicon.gif2014-12-20 16.09.13.jpg

attachicon.gif2014-12-20 16.45.17.jpg

The bearings were definately in need of repacking!!! The front axle more so than the back (thinking the back axle or at least the spindles had been changed at some point as they have a zerk fitting and the fronts do not, also they were full of blue grease and the fronts were mostly dried up red grease)

attachicon.gif2014-12-20 17.10.12.jpg

New fender skirts are being made out of fiberglass since the one got shreded with the blowout and the good one is being used for a mold :thumb1:

I highly recommend the bearing buddies for your hubs. I initially only had 2 of them on my front axle (bought them from a friend for next to nothing) and the fronts actually ran slightly cooler than the rears which I had just repacked by hand. They also prevent dirt and water from being able to contaminate the hub by maintaining a slight amount of pressure. After seeing the difference, I bought a set for the rear axle as well.

http://www.bearingbuddy.com/how.html

When I bought my former 2000 CTD the PO had 8 ply tires on it (factory size). Even empty the truck felt squirmy and it was amplified the heavier I loaded it. Installed an E rated tire and it was night and day difference. I wouldn't run D rated on these trucks if they were given to me.

Edited by diesel4life
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I am not sold on the bearing buddy/EZ lube systems. They make it very easy to overpack them, which reduces the heat removal from the bearings (per Timken). With excess grease the hub may be cooler and the bearing hotter, as heat isn't transferred as effectively.

 

They also do nothing for the requirement to repack them by hand, which is usually an annual requirement.

 

There isn't much replacement for a good old fashioned hand pack.

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I agree with AH64ID. Bearing buddys are good on a boat trailer or any other trailer without brakes. There is a much larger chance of having the seal leak and if there are brake then they will get covered in grease. Yes, it is a PITA to pull the wheels and repack the bearings, but then I also get to check the brakes and bearings to see if they are serviceable for the year.

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