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22george

Start up idle time

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how long do you guys let your engine idle before moving? I thought 10-15 second was long enough to get oil to everything.This forum is great with lots of feedback and interesting discussionStart up idle time

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I usually idle mine for 30 seconds before I move. then I dle out of the rv park I am for another 2 minutes, then on the highway at under 2k rpm until I see the tempgauge move up or the oil pressure gauge start moving down. This for 25* and up, if it is colder i will idle it a few minutes more. I still take it easey until i see one of the gauges moving. I very seldom see any temps out of the teens. You might consider pugging it in for temps that lower than the teens.

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This is for starting temps below +32*F...I typically fire up and set the high idle mode (3 cyl or 6 cyl) set the exhaust brake. By the time I gather up things for the day and load them in the truck its about 100-120*F on the ScanGauge II. I take off. Being light throttled till I reach about 160-165*F of coolant temp then let her have it... "Kick the Pig!" :lol:Above 32*F...I just start the engine and drive... I don't even wait for the light or anything jusrt crank and go... Still being mindful of the coolant temp till about 160-165*F then "Kick the Pig!" :lol:

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I usually idle mine for 30 seconds before I move. then I dle out of the rv park I am for another 2 minutes, then on the highway at under 2k rpm until I see the tempgauge move up or the oil pressure gauge start moving down. This for 25* and up, if it is colder i will idle it a few minutes more. I still take it easey until i see one of the gauges moving. I very seldom see any temps out of the teens. You might consider pugging it in for temps that lower than the teens.

This is about me to the tee. Although I happen to live where it takes me about 10 minutes of light driving to get to town or the freeway. "Exact" idling time can be irrelevant unless you're actually sitting in the cab waiting to drive off. What I do is before I'm completely ready, I go outside, start 'er up, let it idle for a minute or two or three, and then drive away. That may not be an option for people in the city. Long idle times aren't necessary nor are they good but its just important to make sure the oil has had enough time to fully circulate and become thin enough so you're assured that all moving parts are being lubricated. Depending on the outside temp and if the trucks been plugged in will both determine how long you should let it idle before placing a load on the engine. If a trucks been sitting outdoors in zero degree weather without being plugged in, then you can be sure the oil is as thick as mud. And remember its not just the oil that you have to worry about either but that engines are designed with specification clearances ONLY meant for normal running temps. That means that all the moving parts clearances will not be right until everything is at normal running temperature. Point being is if you care to keep your truck running in good condition for a long time then treat it right and keep your engine load to a minimum until as everyone stated, the engine temp is around 160* and the oil pressure is not spiking the gauge. :)

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Very well said Katoom... :smart:My last post seems that I'm in a bit of a hurry and drive off... Typically not. I'm the type to fire it up and gather stuff for the trip being tools for a job, trash to haul to the dumpster, etc... By the time I jump back in the driver seat it had that chance to lube up everything and settle down a bit...Back in my not to distance past I ran a few time out the door to fire call and hauled arse down (not speeding mind you!) to the fire station which is only 1 miles away. I'm kind of glad I'm no longer working the fire dept for that reason... I'm sure its hard on the truck.

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Very well said Katoom... :smart: My last post seems that I'm in a bit of a hurry and drive off... Typically not. I'm the type to fire it up and gather stuff for the trip being tools for a job, trash to haul to the dumpster, etc... By the time I jump back in the driver seat it had that chance to lube up everything and settle down a bit... Back in my not to distance past I ran a few time out the door to fire call and hauled arse down (not speeding mind you!) to the fire station which is only 1 miles away. I'm kind of glad I'm no longer working the fire dept for that reason... I'm sure its hard on the truck.

No worries Mike. Didn't think you ever indicated that you mistreat your ride. And yes, I'm sure your 1 mile dash to the station wasn't good for anything but simply being there in a hurry to help. Thus the reason why fire truck engines are strictly scrutinized and are replaced frequently. No time for warm up for them.

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No worries Mike. Didn't think you ever indicated that you mistreat your ride. And yes, I'm sure your 1 mile dash to the station wasn't good for anything but simply being there in a hurry to help. Thus the reason why fire truck engines are strictly scrutinized and are replaced frequently. No time for warm up for them.

:lmao2::lmao:Really? Scrutinized?! Replaced?! Oh you got to be kidding... The local fire dept can't afford to replace anything. Let alone replace a truck. The oldest truck they had in service during my time was a 1951 International water tender (labeled a engine) and it was slower than a snail (top speed 45 MPH) and all gears had to be double clutched (no syncro's). Then we move up to the 1960's millitary 2 1/2 ton truck classed as water tenders (Top Speed of 50-55 MPH). Then The newest truck there is a 1994 Chevy 6.5L Diesel 3500 (Fast Attack) with 300 gallon water tank. I got tired of servicing 24 fire trucks in 6 different stations every week for absolutely NOTHING! No money! NOTHING! I had to use my own tools and my own truck most of the time too... They hoped in the truck and pedal to the floor without warm up time. The only time that was stopped is if the truck got air brakes then you had to wait for the air to build up just to release the brakes.

Sorry to hijack... :whistle:

As for my truck its had a life of luxury now it stays in the garage just below me which is just above freezing most of the time. But yes it does get enough idle time to build a bit of warmth before hauling off. Thing that does bother me is being hitched up to the travel trailer and it still gets idle time before I haul off but the fact most times out of ten I'm hauling the trailer up hill towards New Meadows, ID so it tough to be light when you go from in the yard to 55 MPH speeds hauling up hill. I will admit the engine warms up rather quickly seeing 800-900*F pyrometer temps... :sofa:

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Brutus is plugged in for winter, once temps get to a constant ~40 or less during day as at night it gets to low 30 or lower. When i hop in i wait for light which is about 3 seconds then crank and sit for about 30 seconds. Then i pull out and am light on the skinny till i leave the hood and then hit up to 45 on main road. by this time its already barely moving the temp needle and i have heat within 5 minutes of leaving the driveway.if it is in single digits or lower i wait till i can hear the engine not working to idle (couple minutes or so) then its the same above. im easy on the skinny until the temp is at operating temp no matter what.

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so i have about a 12min. drive to work.igo outside and fire her up and let it idle until its at 100 degrees then head out.i have the cooldown set at 280 for when i get to work.no highway driving.what do you think?i cant find the 53 yet.

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so i have about a 12min. drive to work.igo outside and fire her up and let it idle until its at 100 degrees then head out.i have the cooldown set at 280 for when i get to work.no highway driving.what do you think?i cant find the 53 yet.

280... as in seconds? I'm assuming you're referring to a turbo timer on the cooldown. If you are, then there's no need at all to even use it, unless you're running the skunk-pee out of the truck, high boost, for the entire trip, then whipping into the work parking lot.. The ONLY time I use the cooldown timer, is if on a roadtrip, highway speeds, for extended time, then take an exit and immediately pull into a store/fuel stop/etc.. I'll let it idle for a minute or so, then. Otherwise, it's a pointless habit, especially for a 12minute trip.

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my reasoning behind the long warm up time is to get the block to an even heat temp.to try and aviod a cracked block,if its a 53

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Gotta admit that I've never heard this saying before. :)

it blocked pee-eye-ess-ess. LOL

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