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My marine batteries are dead. I have two new auto batteries in storage. I never dry camp or store rv I live in rv so converter is always running and charging. Ok to run regular auto ? Saves me buying new deep cycle Can't see why not

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My marine batteries are dead. I have two new auto batteries in storage. I never dry camp or store rv I live in rv so converter is always running and charging. Ok to run regular auto ? Saves me buying new deep cycle Can't see why not

It'll work, just fine as long as they are charging. The deep cycle just last longer without a charging is my understanding.
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They will work... The difference in design is that starting batteries are more for short high amps where deep cycles are for low long amp draws. Then the starting batteries don't have a well for sulphation where deep cycle batteries have a extra space below the plate for sulphated pate material to drop. So yes they will work but won't last as long as deep cycles...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Will they work?..... Well the question should be, for how long. Because yes, they will work but understand that all batteries are not the same. If you try to run a parked and disconnected RV off of auto batteries, they wont last long at all. Not only do automotive not have a very long reserve but automotive batteries are made with thin grid type plate for quick maximum amperage draw for starting. Deep cell batteries contain thick solid cell plates which are for long term low amperage draw. And marine batteries are a combination of the two with thicker grid type cell plates so that they can offer a longer lower amp draw for things like trolling but yet still allow enough amperage draw to start an engine. Every time any battery runs below a certain level of discharge, the cells are deteriorated. That level is different from auto to deep cell. Thats why deep cell batteries are thick and solid which can sustain more discharges and lower discharges. When you discharge an automotive battery, they quickly fall apart and the cells can and will easily short out from the debris. Thats why a few times of leaving the lights on overnight will cause you to replace the battery that wont hold a charge anymore or is shorted out. Point being is yes, you can use them in your RV but its not right and you'll destroy them if you aren't constantly plugged in.

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Will they work?..... Well the question should be, for how long. Because yes, they will work but understand that all batteries are not the same. If you try to run a parked and disconnected RV off of auto batteries, they wont last long at all. Not only do automotive not have a very long reserve but automotive batteries are made with thin grid type plate for quick maximum amperage draw for starting. Deep cell batteries contain thick solid cell plates which are for long term low amperage draw. And marine batteries are a combination of the two with thicker grid type cell plates so that they can offer a longer lower amp draw for things like trolling but yet still allow enough amperage draw to start an engine. Every time any battery runs below a certain level of discharge, the cells are deteriorated. That level is different from auto to deep cell. Thats why deep cell batteries are thick and solid which can sustain more discharges and lower discharges. When you discharge an automotive battery, they quickly fall apart and the cells can and will easily short out from the debris. Thats why a few times of leaving the lights on overnight will cause you to replace the battery that wont hold a charge anymore or is shorted out. Point being is yes, you can use them in your RV but its not right and you'll destroy them if you aren't constantly plugged in.

Will let you know :) I live in RV all the time - only down for up to 8 hours at a time when I travel. Good info team MM :)
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Will be fine, just don't let them get low or they will die a premature death. If you spend that much time on the converter I would get a single gel cell group 24 and call it good. It will handle 99% converter time better.

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I've learned a lot about batteries in recent years. Marine/RV "deep cycle" are really hybrid batteries with enough power for engine starting & built to allow fast recharging. Automotive batteries have more CCAs but deep cycling will kill them. Leaving something turned on, in a car/truck & allowing the battery to drain flat, can kill a brand new automotive battery. Mobility batteries (and solar) are true "deep cycle"... gel cells or sealed AGM (Acid Glass Matt). Very different construction. Can not be fast charged, or the battery will truely be damaged. I have a spare for my Mobility Scooter... tested good so I kept it. I used a battery maintainer to keep it charged all one winter (rotating between the 2 on the scooter & the spare). Last winter I forgot, the spare got low... I left the maintainer on overnight... in the morning there was acid leaking around one post (so the internal pressure has blown the seal). Perhaps I should have used a timer. AGM batteries are HEAVY. I got a lot of money ($25) for the twin to the spare when I scrapped it. Now all this said... if I needed a battery & had an automotive battery... a wet cell... I would use it. It's getting old just sitting there with acid in it. Using on a RV with a power supply will keep it charged, avoiding the need to maintain it. PS I'm thinking of going to Marine/RV batteries on my vehicles on the next replacement.

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