Jump to content

What size welder


Recommended Posts

I don't know if you have access to a 220 volt source, if you do I highly recommend buying one.,IMO the 110 volt units arent worth buying. They're just too limited to what you can weld with. A 220 volt, 160 to 180 amp unit would make a decent little machine for average jobs around the house. I really wouldn't go any smaller. Also, the picture you posted is a stick welder. That's fine if that's what you want but a MIG unit would be much easier to use for a beginner. Gas shield is preferred.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would not weld to the frame, make the brackets bolt on and drill holes. You take the chance of making a week spot in the frame when welding to it and you have a spot where cracks could form. If you are bound and determined to weld on the frame weld length wise laterally with the frame and never never never ever weld vertically on a frame rail, that could be a potential breakage spot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would not weld to the frame, make the brackets bolt on and drill holes. You take the chance of making a week spot in the frame when welding to it and you have a spot where cracks could form. If you are bound and determined to weld on the frame weld length wise laterally with the frame and never never never ever weld vertically on a frame rail, that could be a potential breakage spot.

Well ...... I would except I just came back from the ER after a heavy torque drill stopped all of a sudden whilst drilling frame ....... wasnt fun (they are bolt on)

yes I was drilling at too fast speed

- - - Updated - - -

Bring it up here one day, my buddy that helps me a lot has a tractor shop and welders, he is also a pipefitter and pretty good welder.

dont think I could handle another promise to get out there only to "F"ail :banghead:
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jon, In all honesty, I agree with W&F. I will add though, that welder might do the job, but it won't do the job a better welder would. And this is your frame. At this juncture, I would either take the money you were going to spend on a welder and either have a local dedicated welding & fabrication shop either drill the holes for you, or weld the brackets on and add some "fish scale" plates if you must weld it.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jon, In all honesty, I agree with W&F. I will add though, that welder might do the job, but it won't do the job a better welder would. And this is your frame. At this juncture, I would either take the money you were going to spend on a welder and either have a local dedicated welding & fabrication shop either drill the holes for you, or weld the brackets on and add some "fish scale" plates if you must weld it.

Im ringing around trying to find a shop to "drill" the holes for me. Im a bit gunshy now after my 1st one. Basically I was drilling at full speed on a large torque drill at 3/4" ...... after pilot was done ...... it bit down as it punched through and about tore my hand off ........seems to be getting better but was unable to even pick up a TV remote the next day ..... ........ thinking Id rather spend the $60 to have someone do it for me than go through that again ..... I was just thinking about a welder as from time to time it would come handy ..... and if its only an extra $60 then maybe I could swing it .... but think Im going to pout that idea aside as well based on ^^^^ thx guys
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, bolts.. If you step up the drill bit sizes more you would minimize the metal the drill has to cut each time so you would have a better chance of holding on. You also should be going slowwwwwwww. Even a 1/4" drill bit that is sharp will cut through steel at crawling speeds. The faster you go the faster you dull the bit. Press harder, go slower, use cutting oil, and that bit will last forever. Also going slow means you can let go of the drill without injury easier. If you win the lottery you can use one of these http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/MILWAUKEE-Magnetic-Drill-Press-3F865 We always used them to drill through I-beams and its really slick. And yeah 3/4" might be a little big lol.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3/4" is what comes in the kit -CPPI might give it another go at slower speed and see if I can get the chuck to give way at a certain torque .... My neighbor has a 90 degree Hilti Think I was going too fast .... But now I've been out if action 3 days bit wAry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

As for welders I've got a little 110 VAC MIG welder that I do light weight welding. As for traction bars I would drill and bolt them on. Like others had said I would drill slowly with large bits. As for the binding of the bit I typically just hand tighten the chuck with the idea that if it binds it normally slips in the chuck. I've got a Matkita Drill that is high torque and broke 1/2" bits in it before. I would rather replace chucks than breaking my bits or my arm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've learned to steer clear of ANYTHING corded that drills without a clutch... It does not matter how SLOW you seem to drill. Its always that last little bit of metal before you punch through that binds up and causes big problems...It depends on the job, but at the very least, get a cordless drill and put it on the highest clutch setting. Usually number 15. That way when it comes to the last little bit of metal, it will stop and not send you spinning with the drill! Then, switch to the high speed setting and lightly push until you clear the hole...

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, I got the same kit a while back...I'll be honest with you, I ended up welding the brackets to the frame, because of the way they were formed, they didn't sit flat on it...there was too much of a curve for the bolts to go through. On the passenger side, I had the holes drilled, and the bolts in, so the welds were a reinforcement, as well as keeping it from wobbling side to side. On the driver's side, I straight welded it to the frame...I know you're not supposed to weld to the frame, but I haven't had any issues with the brackets or the frame there. I would not however, recommend a harbor freight or any other "cracker jack" 110 welder-had one years ago, and the only thing you could weld with that was about 1/4 in-and that required multiple passes to get the strength in the weld. I'm using a Lincoln 180 mig now, and I can weld 1/2in steel without much of an issue. It costs a bit more ,but it's worth the money.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks guys Yeah I'm going to take the advice and pass on the welding and attempt again with a drill that has the chuck control even if its cordless and takes me forever ..., Maybe tack weld if I need later for same issue with the design of the bracket on the curve if the frame with long bars ... Good stuff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gradual drill size increments John :thumbup2: That's the most important thing I can tell you that will solve most of your problems. I won't use anything but the high torque arm twisting drill given a choice, but yeah, you gotta be smart about it and don't bite off more than you can chew...as in going from a pilot hole straight to 3/4".. Good luck! You know where I live haha.1/4"-1/2"-5/8"-3/4"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:)Yeah I didn't think it through - just went at it !! Not the first time and probably won't be the last ...When the neighbor loaned me his big commercial drill I was too giddy and just started full speed !!!Live and learn Still sore tho ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...