Jump to content

DIY Tire Balancing


Cowboy

Recommended Posts

Howdy Guys,

 

First off I hope everyone has a wonderful day.  Secondly, I thought I’d share some stuff with yall.  I've been doing some monkeying with balancing my own tires.  I’ve got a tire changer and do almost all my own tire changing.  But if it’s for a truck then I still had to get it balanced.  So I researched a product called “dyna beads” some of you may already know what they are.  They are small ceramic beads that go in the tire and automatically balance the tire.  I was considering them, cause the cost for one tire worth was cheaper then the cost to get one balanced.  And tires apparently wear better with the beads (according to the forums).  But that one side of me took over and I tried some BB’s.  Your everyday steel .177 BB’s you can get at Walmart.  They have been in different trucks now for a couple months, and no issues.  After some research, the apparent problem with steel BB’s is the moisture in the tire will cause them to rust.  So I did some tests.  First, one of the trucks that has them sat for at least a month, and no issues.  Second, I took some BB’s that were left out in the rain and rusted into a clump, and stuck them inside an atv tire, after a couple days (around 5 miles), I pulled them back off and they were perfectly polished.

 

Here’s the chart to know how much to put in different size tires.  If yours is a dually, then you have to use the motorhome chart… haha

 

http://www.innovativebalancing.com/tirechartmap.htm

 

So long story short, you can balance your own tires for $.75!

Edited by Cowboy
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm interested.

 

How about damage to aluminium wheels from the constant fall out of steel BB's in a slow speeds?

I don't think that would be much of an isssue. Ceramic beads just might be more abrasive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

Sounds interesting that for sure. I've heard of the ceramic beads and even heard of putting anti-freeze in tires for balancing agent. Steel BBs sound good I just wasn't sure if the steel cause a sandblasting damage to the wheel or the tires from rolling inside the tires? Technically if the steel BB's where smooth and clean then I don't see any problems for a daily driver rigs. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't see there being any problem with a sandblasting damage from running steel BB's, and believe it or not ceramic is actually harder than steel. Also I wonder if the zinc or copper coated BB's would be better at preventing rust?

Edited by bjytech
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would imagine the ceramic beads would be more abrasive, but BB's are bigger so maybe that would cause them to chew up the aluminium more, IDK.  I have some in a aluminium yota tire, but it hasn't moved an inch from the day I installed it.  One thing you can consider is plastic air soft BBs, that's what some off-roaders use cause they air up/deflate there tires so much it causes a lot of moisture, rusting the BB's.  Though I did read of some guys having problems getting the right amount in, which I think is cause the plastic ones have a lot more volume for the same amount of weight.

 

Right now I've been using zinc coated BB's, cause that's what I have on hand.  But I'm thinking I'll buy copper coated ones because they're cheaper, and I can't imagine the zinc powder left in the tire is good to breathe.  eBay used to have 6000 for $10.99, but now the cheapest I can find is $13.39, which takes the cost per tire (based off a 265/75/16) to $.92  :cry:

 

Also meant to add;  The copperhead BB's are 5.28 gains, which comes out to 83 BB's per Ounce.  So a 265/75/16 would need 415 BB's.

Edited by Cowboy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Meh,   low speeds  the BB's  will be in the bottom of the tire..  and  soon  fling  out  when 'up to speed'..  I imagine  it  wouldn't very fast  until they are  pinned to the   tire.    The static  build up  would  hold them  pretty snug  no???

 

My only concern...  all the patches  I typically run would be  buzzed off!! :ashamed:

 

I've heard of this too..    anyone  care to  'splain the  physics of how it works??

 

 

 

Hey,   what about   00 lead buckshot?    other than  a  'little'  inhalation hazard  whilst  changing the tire..    or would the lead just ball up and make  a  big  slug? 

Edited by rancherman
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I can't explain how they work, but thought this video was pretty interesting. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=eq263AYgyYg&itct=CDsQpDAYASITCPiy5oKYv8ICFU_MywodTmAAN1IKZHluYSBiZWFkcw%3D%3D&hl=en&client=mv-google&gl=US

 

If your patches are firmly pressed on around the edges, I can't see them being an issue.  I've got a couple tires with BB's and Patches, no problems so far.  

Edited by Cowboy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

wasn't there some one that ran the ring with balls in it? balancing rings or something like that?  i know i've read it somewhere. same idea as this. they balance really well.

i know on my old Jeep with 44 swamper boggers i'd run antifreeze it in that was about the best i found back in the day.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I have ran the Centramatics and counteract balance beads.

The Centramatics are great because they last for more than one set of tire, or with summer and winter tires. The reason I don't use Centramatics anymore is because Les Schwab considers them a wheel spacer and they will not install wheel spacers. That is when I switched to counteract balance beads and they work great, I have zero balance issues with my 19.5's and many people have to have the rebalanced several times.

I do run the Centramatics on my travel trailer but I cannot tell you the difference they have made because I don't ride in it, but it does "feel" better and stuff inside moves less.

My dad has dyna beads in his Nitto's, but I have another friend who had bad luck with dyna beads. The tire shop told him that the ridges on the inside of his tires did not allow for proper rotation of the beads while driving. He runs the same Nitro as my dad, but in a smaller size.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From personal experience I can say BB's work good.  On one tire I patched it, took off a ~1.5 oz weight, and throw the BB's in, no imbalance.  Due to the BB's larger size, they might be more resistant to those ridges inside the tire...  might be worth mentioning to your friend if he's still having issues.  The largest tire I've used them in is 265/75/16's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

I don't know why it wouldn't work. Personally I would go with the copper coated ones. I doubt they ever fall and hit the wheel, as you slow gravity and decreasing centrifugal force should let them ride the outside of the tire to the bottom.

 

They may be noisy at slow speed thou.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Moderator

Wouldn't the "trick" be knowing how many BB's to put into the tire????

 

Or do you just take a SWAG and call it good???

 

Weight is weight, get a scale and fill a cup until you hit the required ounces. It should be the same weight as the charts show, I think I have about 5oz per tire on my 19.5's.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Advertisements and Ad Blockers

Mopar1973Man.Com uses the income from advertisers to pay the bills on the website. Please whitelist your ad blockers for Mopar1973Man.Com this will allow advertisements to display on our pages but allows you to still block ads on the other websites you visit. 

 

image.png

I will whitelist Mopar1973Man.Com