Jump to content

Back up fuel pump..Store under seat or mount?


Recommended Posts

Picked up a cater pump for backup pump just in case of airdog failure. Not sure what is best for pump, if I should mount it now or wait till I need it, if I ever do. 

 

Choices are:

 

Carry carter pump under rear seat in plastic bag. 

          ...Ready to go if and when I need it.  Who knows when I might need it, but pump gets no exercise but is not exposed to weather, etc.

 

OR mount it now next to airdog pump?

 

          ...Exposed to weather, and I'll probably will hook it up maybe twice a year to make sure still works.

 

What would yo do?

 

Thanks for your input.

 

 

Edited by 015point9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would not and do not have a spare pump it seems unnecessary. My method is to watch fuel pressure (mechanical gauge) and replace parts as necessary. Truck will run in needed situations on Injection pump only until I can replace bad lift pump which would not take very long. My 2 cents.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

deehammer...Thanks for your input. I used to feel exactly like you until our pump failed many miles from home.  Ended up with very limited choices on mechanics.  And couldn't work on it myself because lack of knowledge (at the time) and the RV place we were in had a cow when I started to drop the tank.  That is what getting the back up pump is about for me.  Not having my choices limited.

Overall I agree with you 100% , But last experience changed my mind. And just about finished installing a fuel pressure gauge. 

 

Bet I'm the only one that has an Airdog pump because mechanic didn't speak English.  Airdog had tech that could speak Spanish to our mechanic. :doh:

Edited by 015point9
edited to make since of my grammar :)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator

I don't bother with too much stuff. I carry more to keep me alive than the truck. I've got day pack with MRE, water, first aid, and other miscellaneous clothing. I would rather walk out and get my vehicle towed home than worrying about carrying all the extra parts, tools for installing said parts, etc. All the parts and tools are heavy compared to a small day pack that weighs less than 20 pounds. What happens if your truck failure isn't one of the parts your carrying and/or your not carrying the tools for said repair? For example when my mainshaft failed in my transmission. Are you going to be able to sustain your own life while you get to help? For me there is no cell service and I might be several miles back in the back country like the photo below being over 30 miles from a town.

 

e9u0zl.jpg

 

2rqf7d1.jpg

Edited by Mopar1973Man
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I carry a spare air dog, never needed it but it doesn't take up to much space. 

 

Being in the back country close to home is one thing, but being a 1000 or more miles and having trouble is another, A spare pump is cheap insurance if the need ever comes. Running your vp on negative fuel pressure is a sure way to kill it. Every time I take the dodge on long trips I always carry more than I think I will need, just like @Buzzinhalfdozen stated above about needing it and not having it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Board Of Directors
40 minutes ago, Mopar1973Man said:

All the parts and tools are heavy compared to a small day pack that weighs less than 20 pounds. What happens if your truck failure isn't one of the parts your carrying and/or your not carrying the tools for said repair?

  You have a good point if you're out in the wilderness and no one can hear you but when in an urban area a Snickers and a cell phone will do. 

  In the summer of 73 I had to replace an engine in a Volvo at Greenwood, Delaware.  When I was done I put the core engine in the trunk and was driving 8hr to Cumberland, Rhode Island by way of I-95.  About 6:00 AM and half way through Connecticut I hear a loud bang, oil light on and in my rearview mirror blue smoke pouring out behind me!   I pull over, shut down, and fearing the worst lift the hood to see if the engine had thrown a rod.  The sides of the block looked all right so I look under the car and see that the oil drain plug had fallen out.  I must not have tightened it very well.

  While I'm doing this roadside inspection I hear a car stop behind mine and it's a Connecticut State Trooper.  The Trooper asks me what the problem is and after telling him what had happened he says "Where are you going to find a drain plug at this time of day around here". 

  Now without thinking I said, "No problem.  I've got a spare engine in the trunk. I'll take the drain plug off of that".  The Trooper replied laughing "Now I've heard of carrying a spare tire, spare belts and hoses but I've never hear of a spare engine"!  

  With the engine on its side in the trunk I took the drain plug off with a socket and ratchet, installed it on the other engine, filled it with oil and went on my way.  I needed a cup of coffee. animated-smileys-drinking-154[1].gif

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Administrator
5 minutes ago, IBMobile said:

You have a good point if you're out in the wilderness and no one can hear you but when in an urban area a Snickers and a cell phone will do. 

 

Most people on this site are in a cell phone area of some sort. So there is no need to worry about carrying parts and tools too much unless you running long distances across the country then things are a bit different. Again for the majority of people on the site and daily driving yeah cell phone and connection to friends and services will do just find. 

 

I'm an exception to the rule being I'm remote and no cell service and travel a lot of dirt roads and back country. 

 

1j2m8j.jpg

 

118nmzc.jpg

 

The biggest thing is taking the time to just inspect your vehicle once in awhile and ensure everything is in working order. You won't find everything wrong or spot every issue but just taking the time to look it over it going to help a bunch. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Board Of Directors

I just got in today from a long trip. 5 miles from home my lift pump is going out and is very weak. I have a spare in the tool box. Instead of replacing I went slow enough to maintain at least 14 p.s.i. fuel pressure.

 

BTW, It was good camping with you again IBM.

Edited by JAG1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd say if I were going to keep a sore pump, I'd just have it installed and ready to plug in and go. If I was ever in a situation where my main lift pump failed, last thing I'd want to worry about would be installing my backup!

Edited by JAG1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Board Of Directors
11 hours ago, notlimah said:

I'd say if I were going to keep a sore pump, I'd just have it installed and ready to plug in and go. If I was ever in a situation where my main lift pump failed, last thing I'd want to worry about would be installing my backup!

I have shut off valves either side of the pump. This way it doesn't drip all over me, when changing and don't loose prime.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On October 17, 2016 at 10:31 AM, JAG1 said:

I have shut off valves either side of the pump. This way it doesn't drip all over me, when changing and don't loose prime.

@JAG1that is a great idea. Can you elaborate on the valves used? Is this a stock lift pump you are using? I am interested in your setup. Could be useful for fuel filter swaps as well.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Board Of Directors

Yes it is useful for filter changes too. The valves are 1/2'' ball valves with all 1/2'' lines. No banjo bolts. Kit is from Vulcan performance with long sweep 90 degree bend at VP. Water sep filter is before the lift pump to stop sediment into the L/P and help the small oem filter. The lift pump is mounted down on the frame for easy change out

Edited by JAG1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...