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flagmanruss

Fuel Economy with the ToyHauler.

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The truck... as in my signature. I've towed a 16' single axle "landscaper's" trailer and 28' gooseneck horse trailer (heavily loaded with camping gear). The mileage goes down noticeably towing the landscaper's trailer & more with the horse trailer... but nothing like with the new-to-us toy hauler. With the TH, straight highway running, I was down in the 9-10 range. The rig seemed to have a lot of drag. Even down hill, it would not "coast". If I lifted my foot, the speed started dropping at once.Late last year we bought the ToyHauler... "28" foot (only includes the box, +3 with the A frame). It is well used & has a Salvage title. Definately not a virgin, there are signs of body damage on the front wall. The rear beds are gone & we only have my electric mobility scooter in the back... it is seriously nose heavy. It is a tag-a-long with a much needed load leveling hitch... I've gotten that part figured out. The trailer is high & has a FLAT FRONT, with just a small radius at the top. It has the aerodynamics of a brick.I was thinking that it was just the aerodynamics... but I'm wondering if there's something else. I think I need to check out the wheels before it goes over the road again. Electric Brakes Wheel Bearings Something could be dragging.

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Yes, Check the electric brakes, wheel bearings, tire pressure, etc. Since it is a flat face, you might try a topper for the truck, like MM has on his, to get the wind up and over. Or you might have to put a 'bubble nose' on it to make the air flow around it better.

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Only pict I have, shows a bit of the front. The A frame has a big (black plastic) tool box with 3 RV batteries (can just see the edge in the photo) & the propane in front of that. Praise the lord, it came with an electric jack.

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Dang this sucker is high! I never had to watch bridges before!

We had to unhook over night... Can't believe we didn't get 1 photo coupled up.

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Don't feel bad Russ... My last trip down to Ontario, OR for new tires I barely pulled 9.9 MPG... :duh: But I took the time and found a public scale and check the weight of both the truck (7,800#) and the Travel Trailer (7,220#) with a Gross Combined 15,020# and the TT was even loaded... No personal effects, no water, no food, no bedding, no toyz... As for the WD (Weight distribution) bars really do help out in controlling your load. As for my brakes and wheel bearing I did mine and went through and re-packed and re-adjusted according to CajFlynn's specs. It seemed to roll better on the return trip with fresh rubber but that's all up hill though :banghead: Caj's is one hell of trailer dragger! :smart: So other than that I'm still waiting for this darn white stuff to go away! :pray:

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I would put a camper shell on the truck if you don't have one. There is a guy I rode dirt bikes with that has a dmax which he pulls this huge trailer that might as well be a semi truck trailer and he didn't get any mileage at all, he put a camper shell on it that had a wing thing on the back to shoot the wind over the trailer and he said it doubled the mpg. Needless to say he has a kodiak now :lmao:

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he put a camper shell on it that had a wing thing on the back to shoot the wind over the trailer and he said it doubled the mpg. Needless to say he has a kodiak now :lmao:

thats interesting For you Toy Haulers TT ...................... I have heard that mileage is LESS than a 5th wheel - due to the aerodymanics. I can get 11-13 mpg towing my 5th wheel ............... so 9-11 mpg towing a TT or TH seems about right :) That wind resistance idea with the CAB camper and wing would be interesting to validate ...... I know some 5th wheel guys that installed them and said maybe 1-2mpg :):thumb1:

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It's going to take one hell of a wing to get the air over that 11' TT! We thought long & hard about what I needed in a camper. I needed a Toy Hauler because I needed the ramp for the scooter. I'm not steady on my feet & have trouble on stairs... so I need a real bed on the same level as the bathroom, especially in the middle of the night..

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It's going to take one hell of a wing to get the air over that 11' TT!

I think a camper shell would work good enough. This guy needed a wing because the trailer was literally as big as those semi trailers. You just don't want the air having to be broke twice, so having the topper keeps the air from going back down and slamming into the entire trailer front.

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I think a camper shell would work good enough. This guy needed a wing because the trailer was literally as big as those semi trailers. You just don't want the air having to be broke twice, so having the topper keeps the air from going back down and slamming into the entire trailer front.

wouldn't be big Just one of these over a camper shell http://www.taylorwings.com/viewProduct.tw?uid=33970e2c-0f01-0000-0080-c83ee55bfd68&type_uid=477ad6cb-0601-0000-0080-f9a7c96a2953&line_code=RVTRUCK

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Anytime you pull a bumper trailer versus a 5th wheel or gooseneck trailer the TT bumper pulls will always pull harder and get less mileage even if they are the same size and weight. Bumper trailers change the rake of the vehicle by squating it further than a 5th wheel where the weight is over the rear axle versus being leveraged down 4 feet behind the axle. Weight distribution hitches help a little and some trailers with the axles centered under the trailer can help but they still do not compare to a 5er or gooseneck.

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The axles under my old 5th wheel were very centered... I got rid of it before I took the C30 off the road since that had the hitch. This TT has the axles way back. The upper bunk that was OEM in the rear probably did not weigh much. That leaves the toys weight. There are tiedowns for 3 ATVs. I forget the exact height but this is damn high. I had to figure out the load distributing hitch as there were some parts missing when we picked it up. (The seller was clueless.) It was one scary drive home with the new purchase. NOW, I've got the truck's front wheels back on the ground! The trailer has mis-matched 15" Trailer Radials on it. I'm not sure of the rating. Since this rig is heavy, I ought to be running near rated pressure. First trip out with the trailer, I should take it by the truckstop scales... find out what it does weigh.

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Look inside your kitchen cabinets should be a sticker that will give you a UVW(Unloaded Vehicle Weight),unless it's been removed.

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Thanks,I'll look for a sticker under the cabinette. It may not be correct as it is now but it's a place to start.

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I would base much off the unloaded weight number... Like I found out that is not the actual weight. Like mine shows 6,588# unloaded weight. But on the scales its 7,220# unloaded. That's a difference of 632#... I know there is not 632# of stuff on my TT now... Best bet is to just pull it up on the scales and weight it...

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The Toy Hauler is parked near the barn. It'll be a month or more... first melt the snow piles then wait for the ground to firm up. I have to drive it out over the "lawn". In the Spring mud season, vehicles have been sunk... in fact I have sunk vehicles. In the mean time, I checked the label which is still there. The "vehicle weight" on the (Salvage) title is 6000. CVWR 10,400UVW 6,220Water 833 “100 gal tank cap”LP gas 67CCC 3,180Mixed brand tires 225/75R15 trailer ~ 2850 @ 80 psi on the one I could get to. That should give about a tire capacity of 11K#. The previous owner had a blowout which he explained was the reason for some wheelwell damage/repair.I've been reading on trailer tires. Might the mixed brand tires be a factor in the towability of this rig? I hate to spend $100 a tire if I don't have to but if it makes the difference, I'll look like a Genious!

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Hmmm... I'm in the same boat right now I got to wait for the ground to frim up too... As for the tires brands are not a issue but the air pressure is. Most tire failure comes from low or flat tire that build up heat and blow out. Like CajFlynn taught me when you pull a trailer take the time and check your tire temps when you stop if something is wrong the failing tire will be much warmer than the others. This includes hubs if the bearings are starting to have problem the hub will be warmer than other (unless its a hung brake/mis-adjusted). But with that much weight I would highly suggest the WD bars... Really make a difference. My TT doesn't even make the truck squat at all. Not even close to the overloads... As for your truck you're good for at least 13,600# trailer weight roughly. Combined truck and Trailer of 20,000# roughly... But this should be in the owners manual of the truck.

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As I posted earlier: "I had to figure out the load distributing hitch as there were some parts missing when we picked it up. It was one scary drive home with the new purchase. NOW, I've got the truck's front wheels back on the ground!" The seller brought out wrenches & helped us. We DID hook up the WD hitch... on the trip home from NH it was all I could do to keep it in our lane... just too little steering ground contact. I felt like I was taking my life in my hands by trying to run 50-55. I knew something was not right. I did my own research before taking it somewhere. I discovered that there should have been a shim pack to adjust the angle of the hitch (and thus the pressure on the WD bars). I brought up the hitch on line http://www.eaz-lift.com/eazlift/Instructions/Elite_Instructions.pdf I substituted a wheel stud and flat washers for the shim pack and spent quite a bit of time trying shim combinations until I got the adjustment right. With the hitch angle right, we were able to connect the chains (it ain't easy) Once I figured out the links, I put a colored zip tie on the correct chain link... that is where it goes. Period. There is a lot of pressure on the bars. Incidentally, in my reading about Weight Distributing hitches, I found articles by experiences users. The article describes measuring the height of the truck from the fender cutout over each tire to the ground. Then hook up the trailer. Ideally, each should have settled equal distance. I believe all the tires are the same size... I'll have to check each one for load rating & TP before towing it. It is a good tip to check for hot tires & bearings. I've always done so on my trailers.

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I've dealt (second hand, always others' trailers who have been in my group) with WAY too many blown tires.It sucks spending time changing flats on the side of the road, and it never happens at a good time or in a good place. ever.Put some good load range E trailer tires on it, two friends have had great success with Maxxis trailer tires after dealing with WAY too many roadside blowouts; they make an E rated tire for a 15" wheel at a pretty reasonable price, I think around $100ea.Tires are at the very top of the list not to skimp on, just ahead of brakes and lights. That's why I was so happy when my trailer already had 19.5s on it, and why I put them on my truck. I won't hurt a load range F or G tire even if I try without breaking axles first :ahhh:

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As others have said the wind resistance is the killer on TT's. I know that my 5K lb TT is as hard or harder to tow than a 15K dump trailer on flat ground. Another example is I have a friend who had an 02 QC SB auto on 35's. He used to tow a 30' 5er with an enclosed motorcycle trailer behind it. He got the same mileage towing that as he did with is 19' TT and no 2nd trailer. As for the high tounge weight, that's the design of all toy haulers. They are built with high pin/tounge weight so that when you load them full of toys they balance out. So an empty toy hauler isn't balanced very well. Several years ago I had a toyota tacoma and a very small 1,200 lb pop-up trailer. For the first few months towing it I had a standard length hitch. I then upgraded to an extended length (6" longer) hitch so I could drop the tailgate. That extra 6" made a HUGE difference in the fuel economy. It's been years so I don't recall what the specific number was, but it was remarkable. I currently use a long receiver as well (18" pin to ball) as I like to be able to drop the tailgate at any angle, and I am sure thats costs me over a mile per gallon.

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I currently use a long receiver as well (18" pin to ball) as I like to be able to drop the tailgate at any angle, and I am sure thats costs me over a mile per gallon.

Just a couple inches longer and you could change both front tires by having a small child stand on the receiver hitch or by sliding the beer cooler from the front of the box to the back of the box to get that leverage weight.:lmao::doh:

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Novice Question...

I currently use a long receiver as well (18" pin to ball) as I like to be able to drop the tailgate at any angle, and I am sure thats costs me over a mile per gallon.

Why would you do this? :shrug:

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Guess my single electric scooter... and it is a big outdoor scooter... isn't heavy enough! Yeah, kind of looks lost in there.

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I don't think I can get the tailgate down with the TH. If I have the gooseneck horse trailer exactly straight, I could lower the gate & crawl under the gooseneck.

To be truthful, I never thought about an extended hitch but I'm sure it's NOT a good idea with a Weight Distributing hitch.

When I hauled hay on my landscaper's trailer... I needed to run with the gate down. I could get it down but not turn without hitting the jack... I unbolted the jack the first year.

By the second year, I'd bought a side swing jack & mounted it next to the platform at the base of the A. I bought a bearing & extended the handle to the side of the platform. I also filled in the open A frame with expanded metal grate. When we were unloading hay, we'd drop the conveyor on the trailer. After the trailer was empty, someone would stand on the A platform pulling hay off the truck & feeding someone loading the conveyor.

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With a standard receiver the tail gate hits the tongue jack, even when straight, put any angle on the truck and you can't hardly drop the gate at all. With the extended receiver I can open the tailgate regardless of the angle between the truck and trailer, makes it much easer for getting stuff in/out of the bed with the trailer attached. Also you can back up at tighter angles and not kiss the trailer with the bed-side. I know it decreases my mileage, but its a worthy cost of fuel.

--- Update to the previous post...

Guess my single electric scooter... big as it is... isn't heavy enough!

Yeah that's probably true. I bet the tanks are in the front too. If your going somewhere that has water I would fill there.

What do you have for a w/d setup?

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